Throwing in the Towel

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by jen12, Apr 29, 2012.

  1. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Apr 29, 2012

    At what point does a reasonable person just decide they've given something a respectable try and it's time to move on?

    No matter how much I want this, no matter how wide a geographic web I cast to catch a listing, no matter how well my transcripts look, no matter how many compliments and requests to sub I collect, no matter how comfortable I feel in the job, there is a very real financial consideration beating me in the face.

    I went into teaching when my corporate job disappeared. I'd been thinking about doing it for a long time and since I wasn't going to have a job anymore, it seemed like a good time to go back to school for my teaching credential. One year doing that, three years subbing, and I'm no closer to having a full time job than I was when I walked out the door of Corporate America.

    I'm not married, and my mom generously agreed to help me out with the career change. I gave up my apartment and moved back in with her, but I just turned 40 this year, and living like I'm 20 again is preposterous and getting more stressful by the day.

    I'm going to have to start looking into corporate jobs again. I despise my former career field, and want to avoid it, so I'm thinking corporate trainer...however, those jobs seem as few and far between as teaching jobs nowadays.

    Sorry...just feeling intensely depressed today. :(
     
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  3. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    Sorry, that sounds depressing. What part of the country do you live in? I understand about the corporate job. I was in one for many years working for a Fortune 500 company. I hate to see you go back to the kind of unrelenting stress that that type of career has. I have attended several trainings this year and they were taught by people that worked for a software company. One of the women worked for the company that sells Fastt Math, Do The Math and Fraction Nation. She travels and says she really enjoys it. She is not based here, but I am due to see her sometime in May. She trains teachers and districts. Maybe something like that. Sending positive thoughts your way. We need teachers in Mississippi.
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Apr 29, 2012

    A lot of what you are feeling and finding frustrating is due to the economy. All jobs are becoming more difficult to come by and teaching is definitely one of the worst areas.

    Are you willing to relocate?
     
  5. mcqxu

    mcqxu Comrade

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    Apr 29, 2012

    Right on with what mopar said...I read in the NYtimes yesterday that college grads are more likely to find jobs in education than in some other fields, and I wondered where they got this information?!!! Education is just a really tough field right now.

    Can I ask what your area of certification is? Is there anything you can add to it?

    Keep your head up!
     
  6. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    I'm willing to relocate within the Southwest. I'm not a good winter person and the idea of dealing with snow when I've never had to before is a little intimidating.

    My cert is in elementary ed and in English, but I tend to look at dealing with middle school and HS students with the same dread that I look at a corporate job.

    I really don't think corporate training would be the end of the world if I had a good company. I worked in HR before and often worked with the training department, so I can make an arugument in an interview that I know how to teach adults as well as children.

    You're right about the economy, but it's not going to turn around soon. I'm realizing that I'm going to have to bend before the economy will.
     
  7. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

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    Apr 29, 2012

    I'm so sorry to hear about your situation. I know you're not alone, but it doesn't make it any easier. The two years I looked for jobs, I didn't have any offers until August (school starts in Sept. around here) and it got stressful, but like you I was living at home (but I was in my 20's at the time).

    If you go back to corporate, will you give up on teaching all together or will you continue looking for that too? :hugs: I wish I had a magic wand for you :(
     
  8. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Apr 29, 2012

    I understand your frustration. I have a job- but it is 750 miles away from my closest family member! After 5 years, it has gotten old. I am looking back home, and if I land something, I will have to move back in with my mom (boo!) until my house sells.

    I would definitely keep looking until the school year begins. It is still pretty early in the hiring process for 2012-2013. When I originally looked out of state (down here in NC), I waited all summer for my phone to ring. I made multiple trips down here and was finally offered a job. Once August hit, my phone rang like crazy. I had several offers and dozens of requests for interviews.
     
  9. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Apr 29, 2012

    Have you applied to schools in Las Vegas? The district just posted it's final list of openings to in-district teachers--it was 60 pages long. After this point, the hiring pool will be opened to out-of-district candidates.

    Why don't you want to teach middle or high schoolers? They can be a lot of fun. Also, I know for a fact that my school (high school) has at least one English position available, probably 2 or 3 before the year is over.
     
  10. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Apr 29, 2012

    Parts of the upper Midwest (North Dakota, in particular) have been doing quite well economically. I was terrified of moving here, having lived my entire life in Miami, FL. All I can say is that I'm SO glad I decided to take the chance. The snow and cold temperatures are very manageable, much to my surprise. I like to tell people that winters here are kind of like summers in Miami, just on the other end of the temperature scale.

    I know that it's not for everybody, but maybe you'd be able to deal with it better than you think you can. I made the choice because it was a choice between accepting this job and moving the ND, or winding up in a homeless shelter with my 3 kids. I couldn't, in good conscience, do that to my kids if I had an alternative, so I moved even though I was terrified. I think I might not have made this choice if I didn't have kids, so I totally understand your trepidation.
     
  11. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Apr 29, 2012

    I actually did apply to Clark County, but my understanding is that Nevada just made a change that makes it wonky to transfer a California credential. I'd love to move to Vegas. I have two good friends there, but according to the licensing people at CCSD, I can't get licensed. What I need to do is speak to the state licensing board directly instead of trying to go through hte school district.

    As far as older kids go, I like that you can get deeper into material, but my true talent is just with younger kids. I was a preschool teacher for a while and my ideal would be kindergarten. But, beggars can't be choosers.
     
  12. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    From what I've heard, Arizona is pretty good for jobs too- and it fits in with your warm climate. I haven't heard the best things about the school systems, but even if it was just for a year or two to get some experience under your belt, you'd have a better chance of being hired elsewhere later.
     
  13. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I think that what you need to do is apply for the Nevada license. Once you've submitted your application for a license, then you'll be able to talk to the state licensing office--they won't be able to answer your questions until they've seen your application. I think that you should do the application now, today, and get the process started.
     
  14. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    Apr 29, 2012

    I know what you are going through. I am quite a bit older than you, wrongfully terminated four years ago, and it has been pure unadulterated hell financially. There is no spouse, no financial safety net other than a $300 a month pension. I am living on a couch while trying to get a teaching license in Oregon so that I can at least substitute and try and look into other possibilities.

    People go into this field thinking there are jobs, but what they wind up doing is wasting years substitute teaching in some hopeless quest to get a teaching job. Once they get it, they are treated like dirt because teachers are a dime a dozen.
     
  15. tonysam

    tonysam Comrade

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    Apr 29, 2012

    Don't hold your breath there are any jobs to speak of. It's not like ten years ago when CCSD was hiring 2,000 teachers a year. The budgets are really in bad shape there and at WCSD.

    I know this has been true in Washoe County the past couple of years that any teacher who is hired on the district from the outside and isn't a high needs field winds up as a one-year-only. Not good.

    CCSD may have a ton of hoops like WCSD has in terms of hiring teachers. You have to go through a bunch of screening to even get on an eligibility list. It's a pain in the rear.

    Sixty pages of openings doesn't mean squat if transfers get to apply for those jobs until the first day of school. And by the way, Nevada has been infected with the Broad virus and teacher protections are gradually being gutted there.

    I know what I am talking about because I lived in Nevada for 26 years and taught there. Stay away from Washoe because of the likelihood you will be on a temporary contract forever unless you are one of the few who is in a high needs area.
     
  16. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Apr 29, 2012

    I agree with mmswm. Leaving your comfort zone might give you the results you want. Nebraska is a great place to find jobs right now, and the COL is very low.
     
  17. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Apr 30, 2012

    What is so sad is that people like you (and me)--we want to teach and make a difference in kid's lives.

    We hear and see the crisis in education: We look at unused classrooms, we look at programs that are gone, we see teachers everyday (NOT ALL... please understand) who take their role for granted... and the door is SHUT to us. "Everyone else--come on in from the cold! Administrators, tenured teachers, RIF teachers... Come on in!"

    "You guys? Stay outside."

    We are relegated to $100/day, no benefits, no years accrued (i.e. seniority), no benefits, no chance of pay increase, no job satisfaction...

    Quite a sacrifice if you ask me.
    We made the same commitment teachers have. Some of us left another career for this one. There are some posters out there who will tell you that opportunities abound for them outside of teaching, but the reality is that most of us don't have somewhere else to go. Most of us have put the last many years of their career into teaching. Going somewhere else (and presumably starting on the bottom) simply isn't a better option.

    My situation is very similar to yours jen. I don't know if you are a sub... but I am. My prospects are just as hopeless, even though I've put a decade into this. I'm as desperate as you. If the district told me to take a LTS next year (which my district pays $140/day, no benefits... ~$25,000. And believe me, I know how many hours, the approximate hours of work going into it... Your hourly rate would probably be around $8/hr.) I WOULD SIGN MY NAME ON THE DOTTED LINE. I would do it because I want satisfaction. So I can justify myself in my profession, make a difference with kids, learn/hone my craft, heck... just so I can call myself "a teacher". (Most teachers won't even refer to you as a teacher. You are a sub.)

    Why would I do such a thing? Why would I take $8/hour, no benefits, and take on such a large responsibility? Is it because I want to destroy the earning power of teaching? Is it because I want to undermine my profession? No. All I want is to do is teach, and move my career along. We (new "teachers") have been relegated to putting their career in limbo, for going on five years now (since 2008), with no end in sight. I can easily envision the same sort of conditions continuing on for another five years. Nothing has changed for us. Teachers on the RIF list get all the sympathy... every year, they get their jobs back and earn another year on the totem pole (since seniority is the be-all). We have done nothing. We have no career, we don't have an income, we have no honor, we have no satisfaction, we have no dignity, NO respect...

    It's almost like we are being made to live a lie. We represent themselves as professionals and educators... as role models (in which BTW, we are lauded for our professionalism by parents, administrators, teachers). But--do you really want your kids to look up to someone who has to drive a car that smokes every time it starts, who can't go out to eat with friends because a night will basically eat up your income that month, lives at home with their parents, etc.

    Now... I'm not asking for sympathy. I'm really not. And I'm not necessarily saying that we are owed anything (except for some respect). These aren't the ramblings of a crazy man. They are ramblings. I think they are relevant, because they illustrate the psyche of the next generation of teachers out there. We have been left out in the cold by our profession. Irrational or not... these are some of the thoughts that run through the mind every day, of that substitute who is in your classroom filling in for you.
     
  18. chasisaac

    chasisaac Comrade

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    Apr 30, 2012

    I spent over 20 years in the computer field and did okay.
    I went into teaching as almost an accident. I needed money so I subbed. Loved it from day one. I explained indirect object v. direct object better than the teacher had the prior day. Gave examples light bulbs clicked on and just fell in love with teaching.

    Taught three years private school, then earn certs., four at another school. Have lots of certs.

    Cannot find a job. Grrr. I can't even land an interview. I am looking unto 100 miles away from home here in South Dakota.

    I have started looking out of state, if I do that I am looking at NC, MO, and KS (TN, KY, ND, AL, ME, AK MS, WI, ID, WY, UT, AR, PA, IN, and OH could also be on the list) as they accept Praxis and are 1. some what close to SD 2. or have Ocean (gulf of mexico no count), and 3. No more tests or classes.

    I have earned in the past year certs in:
    * MS Science, Physical Science,
    * praxis on sat for Math (another story there)
    * Language Arts (more my speed) praxis May 11.
    * and found out my computer work will get me some VO-Tech stuff.

    If I do not find a job this year, I am afraid I am done with teaching.
    This is my 3rd career shift computers, something else for 3yrs, and now teaching. I am getting to durn old for this, but I am willing to adept and change to the environment.

    As far as other fields:
    computers - I seem to be old. Finding a network analyst job after 35 is very hard. And I am closer to 50 than 40. I have applied for over 30 so far.
    Corp Trainer - very hard to come by. Applied for 5 of these so far.

    The only positive thing so far has been interviews for social service jobs at the state. I have had plenty of interviews for these. Mostly due to my three year job.

    As far as MS/HS dread, I see the same thing with 5th graders. Scary little people. The scariest thing in my life (keeping in mind I have been shot at while in military many years ago) was subbing one time for kindergarden. IF you ever saw Kindergarden Cop and his first day, that was me.

    So as to quote my favorite President to make fun of or mock:
    "I feel your pain."

    All we can do is chin up and keep soldiering, I know that is not much to help with. But I can empathize with you greatly.
     
  19. TeachOn

    TeachOn Habitué

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    Apr 30, 2012

    I'm not sure how relevant it is to today's job market, but twenty years ago I followed the LTS-to-full time teacher route. It took two or three years (depending on how you count), but it did work out. The subbing was all at the same school, which may have had something to do with it. (Thank goodness for pregnancy!)

    As for snow, meh, you get used to it. You sort of develop a knack for driving sideways from time to time, and there is nothing as beautiful as spring after a long winter (well, and a mud season).

    Good luck.

    Oh, and "I feel your pain" was first said by Bill Clinton, March 27, 1992.
     
  20. cult

    cult Rookie

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    Apr 30, 2012

    I graduated with my education degree in 2010 and I have worked steadily as a teacher since then. I am beginning a new position next year that will exceed my current salary, which at the time was the most money I had ever earned. I still live in the same metro area where I grew up and all of my family live.

    The secret to my success:

    I teach high school.
    I teach for a charter school without a union.
    I teach in the inner city of a major metropolitan area where death is as commonplace as breakfast.
    I am dual certified, and one of my certs is special education.

    There are jobs to be found, but most are in geographical and perhaps, grade and content areas that are not the first choice of many people. And, most are with charters. Unionized school districts are going the way of the dodo bird.
     
  21. Emmy

    Emmy Companion

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    I agree its the economy, and things are looking like they are going to get much better. I went to a job fair this past weekend, and there were hundreds of teachers there. I heard other teachers tell about being laid off, RIF'd, non-renewed. So even with getting a job there isn't much security.

    I can relate to the living at home situation I am 31 and have NEVER been on my own due to working minimium wage jobs all through college, then graduating and again all I could find was miniumum wage jobs. I've been looking for a job for 3 years now. I've subbed, worked in a preschool and had no luck. I am single so no husband to fall back on financially whereas most of my friends do have the luxury of not having to work cause they are married. I don't know how much longer I should continue to try for a teaching job. I hate to throw away a career that I've spent my life planning for, but I need to get out on my own and make a livable salary. But teaching is all i've done, so I don't know what other kind of job I could possibly find. I'm thinking of giving it 1 or 2 more years and then throwing in the towel.
     
  22. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Apr 30, 2012

    :hugs: Go outside your comfort zone. There are jobs open in my county in Florida. I think the hardest part of teaching right now is knowing that there are jobs... just not necessarily where you want to be.
     
  23. Emmy

    Emmy Companion

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    Apr 30, 2012

    But not everyone is in a position financially to move to another state, or has family and just can't uproot their family to move for a job.
     
  24. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    This is a huge concern. Moving is incredibly pricey, especially if you don't already have a truck of household goods and will have to purchase a fridge, furniture, etc...also, with all of the pink slips each year, in many areas a contract is basically a temporary job anyway. Last hired, first fired. It's all a year at a time.
     
  25. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Technology is hard.
    My mom was in computers for decades, then switched to the phone end...then VOIP came in and her company didn't keep up...when they went under, she couldn't find anything either because she wasn't in on the latest technology.

    And despite the fact that age discrimination is "illegal" it goes on all the time. I worked as a recruiter and saw it on a regular basis. The hiring managers would say that it just wasn't a "good fit" and that the person would be "uncomfortable" with the rest of the staff. It's unfortunate that experience is so easily discarded in so many.

    Best of luck to you.
     
  26. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Moving is hard, but possible. I moved 750 miles away to a state I had only set foot in once (and that was for my interviews. I had spent maybe 48 hours in the state prior to moving). I packed up a fold-up lawn chair, an air mattress, my TV, and my clothes and moved. I cried the entire 750 miles. But I made it work, and if I regret anything, it is not moving sooner.
    (I am trying to move back home now, but it has a lot to do with health issues- my own and my mom's [she has cancer for the third time])
     
  27. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Apr 30, 2012

    Good luck to all looking for a job! I know how stressful that is.

    Just a word about corporate training: it's very different than teaching in a school setting. While you are teaching, adults do not appreciate the 'fun' activities that usually draw teachers to teaching. While I really appreciate my company and my position as head of the training and development department, I really miss elementary teaching. It's just not the same. So if you do go the route of corporate training, it's important to remember that. It's taken me many months to come to grasps with it, and figure out how my adult co-workers best learn/approach training.
     
  28. MotherGoose

    MotherGoose Rookie

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    May 1, 2012

    I applied for well OVER 200 positions with 5 different surrounding districts (Houston area), sent over 100 PERSONAL cover letters/resumes, and went on 14 Job interviews over the course of a year and half BEFORE FINALLY landing a teaching position. AND I was well qualified with 9 years of experience.

    The LAST interview, in which I was FINALLY hired, I already felt defeated and had given up on getting hired. I just KNEW SOMETHING had to be wrong with me since I was turned down the other 13 times. I had FINALLY made real peace with myself over NOT getting hired as a teacher ever again--- I had REALLY thought my career as a teacher was OVER by this point.

    Anyways--- I walked into that last interview with such an attitude: Take it or leave it!... here I am. This is probably a waste of ALL of our time, but here I am anyway! Take me or leave me.

    Well, they took me.:woot:

    Looking back on it now, I see that I tried WAY too hard during the first 13 interviews. I was too nervous. So nervous, I was paralyzed and it was impossible for them to see the REAL me.

    It was when I TRULY did not care WHAT part of me (the good, the bad, the ugly) that they TRULY saw ME. And MUCH to my surprise, they liked the REAL ME! Not the FILTERED one that I had presented all along.

    WOW--- what an eye opener that experience was!

    Anyways--- DON'T QUIT!!!! And PLease GOOGLE the poem "Don't Quit" and READ it OVER AND OVER again! I was made to memorize this poem in the 5th grade, and it has ALWAYS stuck with me and gotten me through tough times. ANd NOW--- I make ALL my students memorize it, I beleive it is one of the best gifts I can give to my students.

    Hang in there, and good luck!
     
  29. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    I think it depends on the person and how much teaching vs. living near family is important to them. My friends thought I was absolutely nuts when I announced I'd gotten a job in Colorado. I would tell people I'd landed a job, and of course their first reaction was to be really excited. When I told them where it was, they all got really quiet and said, "Oh"- even people I wasn't that close to and wouldn't have been that depressed about me leaving really- they just thought it was nuts that someone would pick up and move across the country for a job! For me, I knew I was NEVER going to get the opportunity to teach in my home state area given what I wanted to do. Of course I tried, but the market was impossible. When 5,000 people are applying for jobs, there are tons of absolutely "cream of the crop" candidates that are being turned away. I also was willing to sacrifice some things and not others. For me, location was one of them. I really wanted my own classroom, but was willing to start in sped. However, I was not willing to sacrifice my age group (elementary) or mild/moderate (vs. severe/profound). I wasn't going to take a job I would hate to simply have one. So for me, having a teaching career was worth the move. I've now also settled into a state where teaching jobs are much more available, and I was able to land a job for my dream position next year fairly easily since I was already living here.

    I think people also need to think about just how many breaks teachers really do have- if you want to, you can make it home A LOT. I am home for a week at thanksgiving, about a week and a half at Christmas, a week for spring break, a week in the summer, my parents come out for a week in the summer, my best friend comes out for a different week in the summer...I still see everyone a lot, and I could go home even more if I really wanted to. It's really the same amount that I was in my hometown during college, since I always had a summer job in another state. My new job is about 20 minutes from our big airport, which will be really, really nice! I work in the summers and save that money up for flights. I always fly southwest and only into major airports, so it's really not that expensive at all.
     
  30. Xidous003

    Xidous003 Companion

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    May 1, 2012

    I agree with the comments of a few posters on here. Here are my points (sorry if any are redundant).

    1. Never give up. I sent out well over 100 applications/resumes. I got 5-6 interviews and 1 offer. You only need one job! If you look at my success rate...it was 5-6% for interviews and 1% for an offer...but that is all it took.

    2. If you are able...then I would relocate. We all have our ideal places to work, but usually so do the other hundreds and thousands of applicants. If you can...I would move.

    3. Remember that every 'no is just another stop on the pathway to yes'...I heard a sermon on this topic and it really resonated with me. It sounds cheesy, but remember that many thousands of other teachers are in your position. Keep your head held high!

    Last, but not least...be willing to teach an area you might not wanna teach...even if for a little while. Better to gain full-time experience in some way, shape, or form than not gain any at all.

    GOOD LUCK!!!
     
  31. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    No...adults are irked that they're losing valuable working hours to training...been there.
    I actually was attempting to move into corporate training before my company closed the office in which I worked...which enabled me to go back to school for my teaching credential. I worked in HR for over a decade, so I've done a lot of adult training for various things. I just don't have the official title that would make a resume get noticed, which is the same problem I have as a new teacher.

    There are good and bad aspects to both types of "students." How were you able to make the jump from elementary to corporate?
     
  32. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Yeah, being nervous will kill you in an interview!
    Thanks for the post!
     
  33. Joy

    Joy Cohort

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    May 1, 2012

    I haven't posted anything on here in a couple months because I've been way too busy but I know exactly how you feel about finding a job. I subbed for over two years and heard of a job opening in a nearby school district in February. I went into the interview thinking the same old thing would happen and I wouldn't get it. Well here I am today with the job and two months of teaching already done! Just keep trying. I was very close to giving up and going into something different. I'm so glad that I didn't now!
     
  34. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    May 1, 2012

    I firmly believe that you can do anything for a year. That is the mindset I had when I moved. Like you, applicants were in the thousands per position and there was a ton of nepotism. I was the least likely person to ever move away- anyone who knew me knew this. In high school, people would talk about how they couldn't wait to move away- I talked about how I wanted to teach at the elementary school I went to. Everyone was shocked when I announced I was moving and no one thought I would make it. I did. I moved the day before I had to report- literally. It was in August and I flew home for Labor Day. I flew home a lot the first year. Afterward, I would go home Christmas, Thanksgiving, Spring Break, and a few times over summer. This gradually decreased to a week in the summer and Christmas. Luckily, my parents usually visit twice a year as well. I am also within a day's drive (11 hours). However, the first 2 years I was down here, I was stuck in a lease so I had to fly every time.
     
  35. Xidous003

    Xidous003 Companion

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    May 2, 2012

    giraffe - How is the job market in NC? I am thinking of moving there.
     
  36. tgtbtj

    tgtbtj Companion

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    May 2, 2012

    I'm so sorry

    I'm so sorry your going through this. I was in your exact same position 2 years ago. There was a point when all I could think about was dying. I've never felt so low in my whole life. I decided that I was going to go out there and try no matter what and went out to every school in every school district and handed out my resume and cover letters, talked to principals, secretaries, whoever. I went to charter schools, private schools, catholic schools, anywhere and everywhere. I emailed principals when I had already done everything else. And...I got a job! I never thought it would happen and even now I can hardly believe it. Please don't give up. Try until you get a job. It will happen, just go out there and give it all you got so you'll never regret it. Speaking from someone who was as low if not lower than your feeling right now, you CAN do it! I too was living at home, feeling like a loser but I prayed about it and decided I was going to do whatever it took. Keep trying!
     
  37. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    May 2, 2012

    Elementary is pretty over-saturated. I know my district did away with all of their curriculum specialists due to budget reasons, so they have to put about 20-30 people back into the classrooms. (note- districts here generally consist of the entire county)

    Unfortunately, teaching conditions aren't great, either. We are non-union, and contracts really don't exist. Most teachers have lunch duty, recess duty, and before and/or after school bus/car duty. I am fortunate to get 3 45-minute planning periods a week. I know some schools get 1 30-minute planning period per week. Add to that the fact that we have been on a pay freeze for 4 years now (the state regulates our salary).

    Also, schools will not know their final budget and teacher allotment until the end of July. Hiring typically doesn't happen until mid-summer at the earliest (this was true 5 years ago when there was a shortage of teachers).

    The good news is that I know quite a few teachers that want out and are looking for different jobs. I also know several who moved here and are looking to return to their home state (I am included in this group). So some positions may open up. 3 of the 21 teachers at my school are hoping to find a different job before the next school year, and I teach at the 'best' elementary school in the county. I have friends at other schools that are looking for something different as well.

    This sounds depressing- sorry about that. There ARE jobs, they just are not super easy to come by. It is still easier to find a job here than in New England or the Midwest.

    There are some middle school and high school openings in my county. Feel free to PM me and I'll send you the link.
     
  38. lindsey923

    lindsey923 Rookie

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    May 3, 2012

    I had to respond to the OP just because I really do feel your pain!! I had been working as a prek teacher and then an aide making 11 and 14$ per hour. I probably mailed out over 200 resumes in the last two years. I finally got tired of being broke and relying on my husband to pay all of our bills. I am now working at the regional early intervention office as an intake coordinator.. I never wanted and still don't want an office job but it's decent pay and great benefits. I still apply for teaching positions but I am no longer devoting my life to. I feel so much better about having a decent paycheck and a "real" job, compared to how depressed i was during the last two years.

     
  39. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    May 3, 2012

    jen12, I feel for you. I'm going to PM you! :)
     
  40. Lessa99

    Lessa99 Rookie

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    May 3, 2012

    Im completely with you! This will be my second summer since graduation searching for a teaching job, and already feel it is hopeless. I made A LOT of mistakes in my early college years and I finally graduated college with my teaching degree at age 28! This is obviously not ideal, but I look at my past as a strength, I doubt the schools do. I would do most anything to find a teaching job in my state, the whole state, anywhere in this state! I wish I could figure out what it is that these administrators want to see on a resume or CL because I have sent out hundreds and gotten 0 interviews. I will not give up but it is hard not to. My fiancee works at a daycare, and I work as a paraprofessional at a school, so both low paying jobs and we have decided that we will not have children/a family until we are more financially stable, so I keep thinking that my future family depends on me getting a teaching job now! Sorry for my rant, I wish I had advice for you, but I am in the same boat and the depression is insane! All I can say is good luck friend!
     
  41. Xidous003

    Xidous003 Companion

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    May 3, 2012

    Giraffe - Thanks for the intel. I am a secondary teacher. I am looking at NC, but gotta see how some things works themselves out here first.

    Poster and Others - Add on those certifications, keep your geographic area to look very open (as in anywhere in the USA). It is my humble opinion that those who who suffer the most (we all suffer at times when looking for jobs) when looking for jobs are those who wish to teach one particular grade level/subject and/or want to live/work in one particular area.
     

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