Thoughts on Reading Logs?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by time out, Jun 30, 2012.

  1. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jun 30, 2012

    For the most part these logs are collected at the end of the month and never discussed unless it doesn't add up to the right number of nights or minutes or it is handed in late. That is how they are used in the majority of classrooms.

    My comments to callmebob was that there are other ways to encourage reading other than having logs that are just collected.

    If you want to encourage reading, you need to be asking kids at least once a week by practice and even more if the time permits.
     
  2. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Jun 30, 2012

    We started reading workshop this year and allowed the students to choose which books were in their book boxes (within their reading levels) at school and which of those books went home each evening. The response was amazing. The kids loved reading so much more and were reading more books, even asking to take extra books home. We also announce every 50 book milestone on morning announcements and the kids get to visit the principal for a treasure. We only require the title and parent initials.
     
  3. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    Jun 30, 2012

    I will say, I have noticed over the years that the students who actually complete the reading logs and turn them in are quite often the ones who I know do the reading. Students who don't read more often don't fill out the log. As a teacher it becomes rather easy to spot the students who are lying on the log. If they are not taking AR tests, or not passing the tests when they do take them, or you see that they are not making progress on the books at home. As well if you ask them about what they read and they can't come up with anything at all, it quite often means they really didn't read. I have had others straight out tell me when I ask them that they didn't really do it. If a few students over the years have gotten away with the lie aspect of it, well the only person that hurt was themselves. Reading logs are one tool that can be used among all of the others to help encourage students to read and to help keep them on track with where they need to be reading. Over the years I have used different logs that require different things, but as long as the students read at home and learn to be responsible and turn it in; I am happy.
     
  4. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    I think they are very, very effective, especially if you get the parents on board. I am going to teach two reading courses next year, and both groups will have a reading log (as well as a response section where they focus on skills). I think the hardest thing for me this year will be getting some kids who do not read on board with it. I've been the advanced teacher for four years, and it has been disbanded for this coming year. The biggest thing, first, is reviewing Just Right books and reading skills with mini-lessons. Even if the program doesn't get perfectly off to a grand start in September, it can by October and be successful the rest of the year. It helped tremendously last year for my 4th graders.
     
  5. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    I read your opinion the first time.

    If you don't like my tone, don't read my posts. My name is there, just skip on by. I called no one a name, I just write in a form you do not like. I also have every right to disagree with someone's ideas or opinions and state my reason's why.

    Sorry you can't get passed my writing tone. But I could reply that I don't like your attempt to control the way I express myself.'

    This will be the last post that I address this issue of the tone of my posts with you. You may choose to keep lecturing me on what you deem civil, but I will not be responding.
     
  6. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    That's a good point that I forgot. My students who made the least progress this year were mostly students who didn't fill out the reading log and didn't read at home. Not the only factor in their lack of progress, but definitely one factor!
     
  7. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Jul 1, 2012

    Exactly. My students have to fill out their log and answer a question each night based on their book. It becomes obvious right away when they didn't do their reading because they have a general answer with no details. It's very easy to skim through a book quickly that a fourth grader read and ask questions that would determine whether or not they're really reading if you feel that the reading log has turned into a "lie log." It's also a school policy that students write a full page response to each book they finish so they can't fake those, they have to really be reading, and if they're only reading in school they're never going to read enough books.
     
  8. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jul 1, 2012

    I use them as part of my weekly homework packet. With no exceptions, the kids that had the least improvement in reading were also the kids who never had a reading log completed.
     

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