Thnking of becoming montessori teacher..

Discussion in 'Montessori Archives' started by bkimberli, Mar 10, 2006.

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  1. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Jun 28, 2006

    So you don't have to have a traditional degree like other teachers in the ps system do?

    Sorry I am bringing this back from the dead. I couldn't help but be intrigued and also a little upset that there are others who think their way is the best and only way for everyone. I'd have to take Viola's and Grammy's side on this one. I don't dislike Montessori, actually I am rather intrigued by it, but there are so many ways to teach children and so many molds of children that I don't think it's fair to say there is only "one best way". We are not a cookie cutter society. We all run our classrooms a certain way for a reason, it's what is best for the teacher and the students involved, and because we feel passionate about how we do our job. I'm not a Montessori classroom, but it doesn't make me any less of a good teacher, less passionate of a teacher, my kids less smart, or my kids less well-behaved. And it certainly doesn't mean I am giving my kids any less of an education.
     
  2. asifhusain

    asifhusain Rookie

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    Jun 29, 2006

    If you are pointing out the difference between the Montessori and Regular schools, probably you can also identify lot of difference in the reregular schools within themselves. Like private schools and public schools. You can differentiate them on the basis of approach, facilities, attitude of the teachers etc. Moreover, you cannot say that the children coming out of regular schools are dumbo or lag behind. You will find lot of people of international repute who were educated from these schools.
     
  3. Yenna

    Yenna Companion

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    While I agree that it is true that there is alot of variation among public and private classrooms, one of the features in Montessori is that the classrooms are all pretty similar. There are features of Montessori education that really do not occur in these other classrooms, such as having a 3 year age cycle, a 3 hour work period, freedom within limits, peer teaching and learning, and a adult "Guide" or "Directress" instead of a teacher. In this learning environment, the adult's role is to connect the child to the materials, and then let the child learn the quality expressed through his own efforts. This is so strikingly different from what goes on in teacher led classrooms that I personally feel that the comparison is valid. I also feel that people who understand and identify with Montessori have a right to express their admiration with a philosophy that nourishes the whole child: physical, mental, social and spiritual as well as offering the child a way to beome intimate with abstract concepts with concrete materials for learning. It is a scientifically organized and comprehensive educational philosophy.
     
  4. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Jun 29, 2006

    How can you say these don't occur in other traditional classrooms? The role of a teacher is not much different than a "guide", there are plenty of classrooms that have a 3 year age range, freedom without limits, peer teaching, etc.

    Nobody is saying you can't be passionate in the philosophies you admire, it's putting other ones down in the process...that is not professional in the least. For someone to say, "I love Montessori and what it brings to the table", is different than someone saying, "I think Montessori is the only way that is the best". It's really ignorant.
     
  5. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    I would like to share a tiny bit of information about the Montessori belief.
    The basic Montessori concepts are pretty well known by now (Montessori in Perspective, 1966). 1 - The teacher must pay attention to the child, rather than the child paying attention to the teacher. 2 - The child proceeds at his own pace in an environment controlled to provide means of learning. 3 - Imaginative teaching materials are the heart of the process. 4 - Each of them is self-correcting, thus enabling the child to proceed at his own pace and see his own mistakes. If you were to look inside a Montessori classroom, you would get the impression of "controlled chaos" because each child would be quietly working at his private encounter with whatever learning task he or she chose (Montessori in Perspective, 1966). Montessori often reminded teachers in her course, "When you have solved the problem of controlling the attention of the child, you have solved the entire problem of education." (Kramer, 1976, p. 217). Maria's theories of the sensitive periods in the development of a child were new to people at this time, however, now they seem to correspond with what we consider to be the "needs" of a child at different stages of their development.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    I am not a Montessori teacher, but there is little difference in the way that I run my Pre-K classroom. My children are so capable of taking care of their own needs in the classroom, that some days I joke about them not needing me at all. That is how I trained them.
    What I have found from my experience is that the main component to a successful classroom is the teacher, no matter where you teach. The thing that might make a Montessori school stand out as being consistent with other Montessori schools is that the teachers receive very specific training. They are all on the same page so-to- speak. I'm not so sure that's the case in Public schools.
    However, I do feel that the Montessori teachers(in general,) need to get their noses out of the air and realize that they are not gods.
     
  6. Yenna

    Yenna Companion

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    Jul 1, 2006

    The other thing that clearly differentiates Montessori is the materials. The presentations are organized in an integrated learning system. The materials are scientifically designed to isolate a specific quality so that the child is able to master one concept at a time and applies this acquired knowledge to new materials in a successive progression from simple to complex skills. The child can guage his own progress because of the order of the materials and of the classroom. The materials all contain a control of error so that the child can identify his own mistakes and take steps to correct them independent of adult praise or punishment.
     
  7. Yenna

    Yenna Companion

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    The role of a teacher is different than that of a guide because the teacher teaches, the guide introduces the child to specific materials and then lets him teach himself.
    Where have you seen a 3 year age range? Some Montessori ideals are filtering in to mainstream education, rarely with due credit.
     
  8. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    If you don't see others teachers doing this, then you clearly need to observe more traditional classrooms. It depends on the teacher and there are many who bring this to their classroom. And where have I seen a 3 year age range? Seriously? Again, you really need to check out more classrooms before you generalize.
     
  9. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    Jul 1, 2006

    The toddler room is usually from 18month- 2year old
    Then the preschool room is usually 2 1/2 years old to 5
    Elementary room is usually 6-9 and upper elementatry ages 9-12

    How a school 'HOUSES' them is up to the school. I have my certification in Montessori and have worked in a public magnet montessori, private montessori, and public school traditional setting. My preferance is in a montessori environment but I also am capable of using my course trainings, IN my traditional environment. I construct my own montessori materials to emphasize the science topic or the mathematics manipulatives. During instructional lessons, I ALWAYS draw out pictoral presentation of ANY mathematics as if the Montessori materials were physically in front of us. Sometimes I have a 'paper version' of the wood material. Or I draw on the board using multicolored dry erase markers (math needs green red blue and gold!) and for language (the grammar symbols has a rainbow of colors that I buy the multi dry erase packs that include all the colors I need) I USE of the Montessori Philosophy as much as I can and try to create an atmosphere that fosters the children's interest. I DO have MANY Montessori materials I have purchased over the years from Montessori R&D Resources, that I have felt SOOOO WORTH the purchase.

    This is what the "THREE YEAR AGE RANGE" is!
    Certification allows you a Credential II which includes BOTH elem 6-9 AND elem 9-12 IF you take the courses....
     
  10. JaZMum

    JaZMum Rookie

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    Jul 1, 2006

    Wow!
    After reading these posts I am feeling a little tension! This is why the world is the way it is. Everyone has different ideas, beliefs and teaching philosophies. Why not embrace each other's differences rather than attack them. I wouldn't have dreamed of entering the Montessori Forum and then started attacking their beliefs.


    If someone does enter the room whilst you are sharing a learning experience with a child, do you make eye contact? I guess anyone entering the room would be aware of the way things operate.
     
  11. Pattypoo

    Pattypoo Comrade

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    Jul 1, 2006

    JaZUM, When someone enters my classroom and I am giving a presentation to a child, usually the other person will wait quietly until I am done. It is just being polite and respectful. I will make eye contact if I am aware that they are in the room. The children also wait before interrupting. I do acknowledge them with eye contact to let them know that I am aware that they need my attention. This thread started out as a simple answer to a question about becoming a Montessori teacher and somehow it has evolved into something hateful. I come on this website to share ideas and connect with other Montessori teachers. If a person does not believe in the Montessori method then I don't know why they would come here to call people names. I did post that I believed that Montessori was the best form of education that I have come across. It is the reason that I chose to go into this style of teaching and to send my son to a Montessori school. Of course there are many other methods that work for children too. For me it was Montessori. For someone else it can be traditional, High-Scope, Waldorf, Reggio, etc. This is what makes us all different. I would never go into a forum and start bashing the beliefs of another person. As a Montessori Directress, I do not walk around with my nose in the air nor do I think I am a god. Like I said, I joined this forum to connect with other Montessorians. I belong to many different types of educational forums, including traditional. This is the only one that has such negativity. I must give a big THANK YOU to mommaruthie who always is willing to share information, websites and to give encouragement.
     
  12. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Jul 1, 2006

    This is offensive and not true at all.

     
  13. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    Jul 1, 2006

    That comment made by jazzminjoy just shows his/her lack of knowledge about regular schools. I could go on and on responding to that comment, but it will just aggrivate me. It was just a very ignorant statement.
     
  14. JaZMum

    JaZMum Rookie

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    Jul 2, 2006

    Perhaps there needs to be a Forum for Friendly Debating.
     
  15. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Consider this friendly?

    This is the point.
     
  16. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    Lets continue to share ideas, philosophies, without the personal attacks. I really think that philosophies are like opinions. We each have one and much like belly buttons, we each have one of those, and yet NONE are the exact same!
     
  17. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    That's exactly what I just said, but in different words. I hope everyone agrees.
    I am very interested in Montessori and have been involved to a degree. When our charter Montessori started here, I was approached to help get it up and running. I declined because it was in direct opposition to my place of employment. They put it into the school system. I admire at least one of the teachers there. She gives it her all and I am totally in love with all of their equipment. I wish I had some of it. Ruth, you had stated you made much of your stuff. Is it hard to do? What are some of the basic things that one would want to have ? Although I teach in a traditional setting, I use much of the MOntessori philosophy. I just don't have all of the items to set things up as I would like to. I promote a lot of self help skills and guiding the class. They have become quite self sufficient.
     
  18. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jul 2, 2006

    I am sorry that I have not been following this thread. It is quite shameful that intelligent, informed teachers have felt free to generalize personal opinions about groups of other teachers or even institutions. You simply cannot say 'all' Montessori or 'all' public schools are any one way in particular. To have alleged that certain types of teachers are snobs, certain types of schools are guilty of dumbing-down, certain opinions are ignorant is simply not acceptable on a professional forum.

    If your goal is to antagonize others, ruffle feathers in an incendiary manner, debate issues with personal attacks, then you should take that type of exchange elsewhere. These forums must remain professional.

    This thread is now closed.
     
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