Thnking of becoming montessori teacher..

Discussion in 'Montessori Archives' started by bkimberli, Mar 10, 2006.

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  1. bkimberli

    bkimberli New Member

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    Mar 10, 2006

    Hello,
    I am a mommy of 2 boys, 1 year old and 5 year old. My 5 year old is now in prek in a local montessori private preschool. I have my bachelors degree in health, leisure and exercise science and right now am a stay at home mom. I really enjoy montessori and the director of his school, after i volunteer there so much, wants me to go to montessori training and become a teacher there. Right now she only goes to 1st grade but wants to continue to grow. My question is basically how do you like montessori? I love it! but want to know what to expect and if i should even consider it. Any input you could give me would be great! I appreciate it and look forward to hearing lots of good stuff! thank you
    Kim
     
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  3. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    kim,
    I am a huge fan of montessori. I hope you find the class time rewarding. My certification is in ages 6-9 and 9-12. My FAVORITE time was watching the 2 and a half year olds working in the same room as five year olds!
    Ruth
     
  4. Pattypoo

    Pattypoo Comrade

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    Mar 11, 2006

    I love Montessori. I started out the same way. My son attended Montessori from preschool-6th grade. I started out as an assistant in the 3-6 early childhood class. I then went for my training. If you are not sure, then I would strongly suggest that you become an assistant. It would be to your advantage to have the classroom experience before going for training. You will be able to better understand the presentations of the lessons. GOOD LUCK!
     
  5. montessori bob

    montessori bob Rookie

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    Check out Angeline Stoll Lillard's book "Montessori: The Science Behind the Genius." This book will give you a better understanding of Montessori.
     
  6. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    I am not a huge fan of Montessori. I know several students who attend Montessori.They have behavior problems when put into a group of children involved in free play. The children who attend Montessori in our school district have no toys and I have found this to be the "norm" in Montessori classrooms. They are 4 and 5 years old and want to PLAY...with toys...trucks, dolls, and dinosaurs.
     
  7. Pattypoo

    Pattypoo Comrade

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    Mar 15, 2006

    Grammy teacher, have you visited a Montessori classroom in action?
     
  8. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    The classrooms are very robotic. They brag about "free choice", but that only applies if a child goes through their hoops first. The teacher's have holier-than-thou- attitudes and the kids and the parents are just plain blind. That is what I see in the classroom.
     
  9. Pattypoo

    Pattypoo Comrade

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    I am sorry that the Montessori class that you observed left you with a bad impression. You can come and visit my classroom. The kids are anything but "little robots." They are inquisitive and creative and able to think outside the box. I am a parent and teacher of Montessori for over 8 years. My son received a wonderful education and the teachers at his "traditional" school have nothing but kind remarks about his behavior and enthusiasm for learning.
     
  10. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    I would likely credit you for your sons good behavior and not the Montessori school. Good luck in your venture as a Montessori teacher and remember that it is not better than traditional schooling...it is just different.
     
  11. Pattypoo

    Pattypoo Comrade

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    I actually think it is better than traditional schooling. That is the reason that I sent my son to a Montessori school and why I chose to be a Montessori teacher.
     
  12. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Why do you think it's better that tradtional schooling?
     
  13. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    ?

    Why do you think Montessori is better than traditonal schooling?
     
  14. SpeechTeach

    SpeechTeach New Member

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    I was a Montessori teacher for many years as well as a Montessori mom. I am now working in the public school system in a traditional educatinal setting. I feel confidant that I can accurately comment on both settings. It has been my experience that children with behavior problems exhibit those tendencies before that enter the Montessori environment. Montessori is about free choice of "work" and yes the children must have a lesson on any new work before they are allowed to choose that work. This is to show them how to respect the very expensive materials and their learning environment. Montessori teachers sometimes seem aloft because we teach by example with minimal words. The childen are always a priority and any interruption by an inquiring adult will be ignored until a lesson with a child is complete. As with any situation there are good Montessori schools and there are some with lower standards. My advice to a potential teacher is to make sure you want to work for the gratification of teaching young minds because the salary will not be much. The reason Montessori is superior to traditional is because the children learn to learn not to take a test.
     
  15. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Here is how my traditional Preschool is run. The children are given free choice of activities, but only after we have talked about how to use them . I use minimal words in my classroom, but have meaningful conversation all day long with the children. I am not "aloof" to anyone who enters my classroom...ever. Everyone is made to feel welcome and comfortable at all times. I have seen the Montessori report cards and they are basically just like the ones we use. Children's progress is recorded. There are no tests in my classroom. I do not claim to be superior to Montessori. That is the difference between traditional and Montessori. "We" do not say we are better, just different. That is why I feel Montessori teachers act like they have their noses up in the air...like they think they are better. What makes Montessori teachers act like that?
     
  16. ViolaSwamp

    ViolaSwamp Habitué

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    Grammy I'm on the fence about Montessori too (I teach in public school) but I think you sound a little aloof right now too :)
     
  17. amy-

    amy- Rookie

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    Montessori teachers do not feel like they are better than anyone else. We all (traditional and montessori teachers) have the same goal to help children become the best people they can be. It is the method behind the montessori that we feel is the best for the children.

    Maria Montessori devised a very different method of educating children, based on her observations of how they naturally learn.

    Children learn best, Maria Montessori believed, through an active discovery process that capitalizes on their innate curiosity, concentration and passion for learning. Montessori methods emphasize independent, student-initiated work, problem solving, mixed age groupings, flexible pacing and freedom of movement. Subjects are interwoven, the teacher acts as a guide, and portfolio assessments are given instead of grades.

    There is now modern research in psychology that suggests the Montessori system is much more suited to how children learn and develop than the traditional system.
     
  18. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Ha!

    If you'd look a little closer you would see I'm basically repeating what someone else posted! Proves my point, they act like they are better than everyone else...and I don't like it either...so don't tell me that they don't...
     
  19. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    I really don't have much experience with montessori, but that point really bothers me. Could someone enlighten me as to how this works ?
     
  20. ViolaSwamp

    ViolaSwamp Habitué

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    Hello? I didn't. :p
     
  21. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Hello! I wasn't talking to YOU:)
     
  22. ViolaSwamp

    ViolaSwamp Habitué

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    Oh:eek: --I knew I needed to get my eyes tested...I just didn't realize my reading comprehension skills were as low as they are, ha ha.
     
  23. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    hahaha...now if only I could remember what this thread is even all about...I am writing in between watching our grandson(made cookies now!) ahahahhhhhhhhhhh
     
  24. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Viola it's a good thing we can give each other "crap"... and not get all in a huff.:p
     
  25. ViolaSwamp

    ViolaSwamp Habitué

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    Yup!
     
  26. SpeechTeach

    SpeechTeach New Member

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    Adults are not ignored when they enter the Montessori setting, quite the contrary. The children are individually introduced to the adult. Let me clarify when the adults are ignored. The adults are discouraged form interruping a lesson being given to a child by another adult.
     
  27. BeccaK

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    I am still a student in college...however...I have learned a lot about the montessori program. I also spend most of my internships in traditional settings...therefore I feel that I have a decent idea of both. I am not sure about the interrupting part of the montessori program...that just doesn't seem right to me...I feel that children need to be prepared for life...and life has its ups and downs and its interruptions. If the children do not see this while in school then how will they know to handle it when they get older? I would love to know the answer to this. I have a mentor who has advised me to go into a montessori program...so i am extremely interested in this post...I really need more information on it before I can make a good decision. Thanks!
     
  28. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    Maria Montessori is a philosopher. She has like all other philosophers created their ideas into strategies. If you can relate/connect with any one philosopher then that is who you can most follow. I suggest observing MANY montessori programs and compare the shelves/materials and then compare the dynamics- make sure you see a class in operation. I hope this thread in NO WAY would persuade you to not pursue montessori. I hope it DOES motivate you to want to investigate further!
     
  29. BeccaK

    BeccaK Companion

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    Trust me...a thread online will in no way create my decision fully. But hearing others perspectives on it will help me understand it and make a informed decision.
     
  30. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

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    If a Nobel Prize winner was giving a lecture, and you walked into the room, would you interupt the speaker? I hope not. Why? To show respect for the speaker, those listening, and the educational moment. Montessori teachers teach respect for these things, too, by not allowing the non-emergency interuption of a lesson.
     
  31. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

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    I would say a huge difference between regular and Montessori schools is that regular schools tend to dumb down the curriculum. A very bright child will only go so far in a traditional classroom because the teacher needs to keep the class "together" academically. In a Montessori classroom, there are materials that go well beyond what is normally taught to a child of a particular age. For instance, when my daughter was 4, she understood place value, could count beyond 1,000, and could do simple addition and subtraction. Other four year olds were just learning to count to 20 by rote. She could read and spell at a 2nd grade level. Her peers were just learning the alphabet and beginning consonant sounds. She taught herself things for the joy of it. Her peers learned to parrot the teacher for a sticker or other reward.
     
  32. Pattypoo

    Pattypoo Comrade

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    I agree jazzminjoy. This year I had one child "skip" K and another one tested #4 out of 1200 children for the gifted program in our city. When I use traditional workbooks I buy 1st and 2nd grade level.
     
  33. ViolaSwamp

    ViolaSwamp Habitué

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    Right, we purposely dumb down the curriculum. In the future please keep your insulting comments and gross generalizations to yourself. It is possible to promote your program without insulting other programs.
     
  34. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    I agree...with Viola. You are not any better than anyone else who teaches kids so don't act like it ,please.
     
  35. TheConspiracy

    TheConspiracy Companion

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    Well, I was just browsing and I thought I would throw in my two cents.

    My son WAS in a Montessori school (he is 5 and now attending a wonderful Waldorf school) and I found it to be a horror show (and this was a BERY highly rated Montessori school - so it isn't just a matter of finding a "bad apple"). The teachers were aloof - interruptions or no interruptions. They treated my son horribly and in the 9 months that he attended we watched him degrade from a happt little boy to a very angry, defiant child. And we thought (for a while anyway) that there was something wrong with HIM. Afterall the wonderful things we had heard about Montessori - it HAD to be him - right? WRONG.

    The fact is - Montessori schools would do a lot better if they actually believed in Maria Montessori's principals. She worked with difficult, poor children and through loving patience got them to behave better and learn more. But not so with present day Montessori schools. They are a privilege marker of upper class society and like all other private schools that mark privilege- they don't want a "bad sort". Heaven help you if you don't have a stepford child. They don't have the time for that. They can just pluck off a naturally compliant child from their waiting list of SUV soccer mommies to help bolster their statistics. (Yeah - 98% success rate - 98% of WHAT? Not any child, I promise you).

    And I wouldn't be so negative except that it took less than one week at my son's present school to see an about-face. He no longer cried at school time. He learned in 1 month skills that were sorely lacking (and very necessary for his current development) in 9 months at the Montessori class. The teachers at his current school treat him witht he love and compassion I never saw at the M school. And guess what? Children respond to love and compassion more than austerity and aloofness.

    I hate to gripe - but I suppose I just did.

    And yes- I am willing to say that there are some Montessori schools out there that are great. But I think one of the red flags that one should see waving around when they look at Montessori is that they have lost the foundation of their philosophy. For a philosophy that is based around working with poor children - why is it that most Montessori schools require 1.5 to 3 times the tuition of other schools? Just something to think about.

    ~J
     
  36. asifhusain

    asifhusain Rookie

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    I feel the discussion should be more on a comparision between montessori and Kindergarten as to which one is better in terms of learning and exciting in terms of teaching rather than competing with traditional schooling.
     
  37. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    ?

    This thread could be interesting if the Montessori teachers would quit slamming traditional Preschools. It's o.k. to be different..but when someone comes across as being superior, people get their dander up. This should not be about which one is "better." We all have our strong and weak points.
     
  38. Yenna

    Yenna Companion

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    I am a Montessori Directress and I love it! It has been a great career to have while raising young children. I also strongly identify with the philosophy and methods. Please read Absorbent Mind, Secret to Childhood or the Discovery of the Child, all written by M. Montessori.
    Recently, I've been reading Montessori: The Science behind the Genius by Angeline Stoll Lilliard. She demonstrates that modern psychological research is supporting Montessori's learning environment.
     
  39. Pattypoo

    Pattypoo Comrade

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    I need to read Angeline Stoll Lillard's book this summer. I have heard great things about it.
     
  40. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Can I ask a dumb question- what additional training does one need to become a Montesorri teacher.
     
  41. Pattypoo

    Pattypoo Comrade

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    MissFrizzle, There are several Montessori training centers where a person can learn the philosophy of Maria Montessori. In my training, I had 8 weeks of lectures, presentations, and working with materials, plus five 4 day seminars through the year. I was an intern in the classroom for a year. I was supervised by an AMS Montessori directress. During that year I had a monthly observation from the training center. Some of the training center work included 8 book reports, making our own 'works' from each area of the classroom, a special interest project, and a year long observation paper on a child in the classroom. Plus, making the albums for Practical Life, Sensorial, Administration, Math, Language, and Cultural. Each presentation had to be written out and illustrated. When I finished my training, I was able to receive 12 college credits toward a Master's degree in Early Childhood.
     
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