This might be a crazy question...

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by Deb06, Aug 11, 2006.

  1. Deb06

    Deb06 Companion

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    Aug 11, 2006

    I know it might be a dumb question, but what exactly is meant by a Mild/Moderate Disability? I just got hired as a K-3 special education teacher for students with mild/moderate disabilties. I haven't received their IEP's yet, and I'm unsure of what exactly these students will need. I think I'm on the right track, but if anyone can explain what exactly it means to be mild or moderate, and problem areas for these students, it would be much appreciated! Thanks.
     
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  3. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Aug 11, 2006

    I think IEPs will be your true help.
    I guess I think of Mild/Moderate as many things Speech and Language only, Mild Autism, Mild MR, Downs (depending on IQ), Learning disabled, etc.

    I think of Severe/Profound as the kids who need 1:1 most of the time, Kids with severe speech/language delays both receptive/expressive/ kids who have major difficulties with self-help skills along with severe IQ disabilities.

    I think the IEP will help you along, but I feel I don't truly know new kids by their IEPs. It takes them awhile to adjust to the new settings etc...
     
  4. Deb06

    Deb06 Companion

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    Aug 11, 2006

    Thanks for the information. :)

    You're right, I think the IEP's will help me a great deal! Hopefully I can get those on Monday since school starts on the 23rd! Eek. I also agree that I won't get to truly know what each student needs until they are actually in the classroom.

    Thanks for your help, chicagoturtle. :)
     
  5. Deb06

    Deb06 Companion

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    Aug 12, 2006

    Anyone else have any tips/ideas/suggestions. Eleven days until school starts and I still haven't received any IEP's. =/
     
  6. brett158

    brett158 Companion

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    Aug 12, 2006

    From my experience the mild/moderate classification doesnt mean too much. I teach K-5 students which are aupposed to be mild/moderate but I have a WIDE range of students from ones who need 1:1 attention and others who I dont even need to see because they function so well in the regular education classroom. There is not too much you can do before seeing the IEP's. Do you have some beginning of the year assessments ready. For example I spend the first week giving students a reading assessment and math assessment to see where they are at. I also have all of my students give me a writing sample at the beginning of the year.
     
  7. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

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    Aug 12, 2006

    Deb,

    I would first take the time to read the IEP before you decide what your students are capable of doing. Are you going to be working in a self-contained special day classroom (SDC)? I work in a self-contained special day classroom at a local middle school. I'm the autism support teacher there. My students have moderate/severe autism though. I have a more modified academic/life-skills based structured classroom. I am lucky to have at least one paraprofessional who works with some of my students. She is very caring and loving towards the students which I really admire. We do not give special breaks to our children because of their autism, we do our best to accomodate their autistic tendencies. I also have one student who requires 1:1 assistance or he will wander and not focus. The majority of my students live in homes where English is a second language as well. It's frustrating trying to communicate with the parents and they don't even speak English. I wish more parents of children with moderate/severe disabilites would STOP BABYING their child. We make our students responsible for their own behavior by giving them positive and negative consequences. They also start to learn that making positive choices will get them positive consequences. Read the IEP before you decide what you're going to do. I would also make an effort to find out what kind of curriculum you are responsible for as well.

    Troy in Downey, Ca
    AspieTeacher (proud of my autism)
     
  8. Deb06

    Deb06 Companion

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    Aug 12, 2006

    Thanks for the info. :) I am REALLLY hoping to get the IEP's on Monday.

    Beginning of the year assessments are definitely something that I want to do. Does anyone have any ideas for beginning of the year reading assessments? It's so hard to plan for the right materials when I have no idea what levels these students are on.
     
  9. Giggles1100

    Giggles1100 Comrade

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    Aug 12, 2006

    Well In my school distric that lable does not include autistic childrent ehy are included under the communication disorders. Mild to moderate in our school district is more of a Life skills class, with some academics thrown in, meaning they might beable to regular electives and they might go to an english class with an aide and then you help modify the heck out of their work for them to do a lesson. BUT every school districts definition of what is what is different.
     

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