Third grade: Teaching equivalent fractions on a number line. How do you personally do it?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by teacherperson, Nov 12, 2016.

  1. teacherperson

    teacherperson Rookie

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    Nov 12, 2016

    I'm a student teacher in third grade. We've already talked about equivalent fractions and starting this Monday, we're going to start teaching them how to show equivalent fractions on a number line. I have no idea how to do this? Any advice? How you personally go about this?
     
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  3. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Nov 12, 2016

    The only thing that comes to mind for me is a minilesson I taught during college - we made different numberlines split into different fractions (halves, fourths, etc.) and lined them all up on top of each other. That way the kids could see that 2/4 and 1/2 (and 3/6 and 4/8 or whatever other fractions you're teaching) all line up in the middle. Once they see it visually and make that connection you can start talking about how the numbers match up - 2 is half of 4, 3 is half of 6, 4 is half of 8, 1 is half of 2... etc. so you can tie it back to them all being equivalent.
     
  4. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Nov 12, 2016

    4aba682ec84f0436bcc87a1d4f31a53f.jpg

    That's how I'd do it as described above.
     
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  5. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Nov 12, 2016

    But maybe you mean an actual number line?

    I googled and saw this on IXL:

    Screen Shot 2016-11-12 at 10.29.37 AM.png

    That could also be a thing. But I stand by fraction strips first. ;)
     
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  6. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Nov 12, 2016

    I think either - fraction strips probably work best because the students can physically make them with strips of paper, which adds a kinesthetic aspect that most kids really need.
     
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Nov 12, 2016

    Let me add that, with a little determination and a certain willingness to fiddle cell boundaries, one can make equivalent-fraction strips in a word processor: set up a table that's (denominator) wide by 1 tall (or 2 tall, if you prefer the labels on top of or below the fractional pieces rather than in them). Copy-paste (with a following space, so two tables don't try to become one) for multiple tables, making sure they stay the same width; for smaller or larger denominators, split or merge cells as appropriate, being sure afterward to fiddle the table properties so each cell is the same width. I've gotten this to work in portrait view for denominators up to 24, though the labels start getting crowded in the cells unless the font is kind of small. You could also switch to landscape view or fiddle the page margins or both.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 12, 2016

    Perfect! Typically, on the last few standardized tests, kids have been asked to mark a spot on a line divided into eights that would be equivalent to some specified fraction with fourths as the denominator. One can find plenty of black line master fraction strips online like FourSquare posted. The more experience your kiddos have manipulating these, the better....I also teach my kiddos how to compare fractions and to write equivalent fractions.
     
  9. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Nov 12, 2016

    ,
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
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  10. Sarah Zolman

    Sarah Zolman Guest

    Nov 15, 2016

    math is fun dot com

    This link will lead you to an interactive number line, which has the advantage of being easy to manipulate. It will need some introduction first, and i think you will find some success building a concept across representations. So connecting this to fraction circles, cuisenaire rods, and area models perhaps..
    Only asking them to find equivalent fractions is perhaps too simple a task with this tool, but maybe have the students use the tool to solve problems- so they are leaning on the tool for support as they learn about mathematics by doing mathematics. (Van De Walle)
    When you set the students on a task of solving a mystery or a problem you might find they are more motivated to work and make the connections you are looking for vs. you trying to transmit the information to them.

    I hope this is helpful. Good luck.

    Warmly,

    SFZ
     

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