thinking of getting a spec ed endorsement

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by sizzla_222, Nov 9, 2012.

  1. sizzla_222

    sizzla_222 Companion

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    Nov 9, 2012

    hey guys!
    I am thinking of getting a special education endorsement onto my current license of 4-9 social studies and language arts. I have heard and found online that the job expectency is very high. higher than the average growth in the average job.

    This will be a hard decision as financially it will be hard, as well as it being hard on me with a family etc cuz of the time it would take.

    What do you guys like about spec ed? what are the challening?

    How does it compare to regular classroom teaching?
     
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  3. Tutor

    Tutor Comrade

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    Nov 9, 2012

    I see you are in Ohio and so am I. I have a sped degree and jobs are still hard to come by UNLESS you want to teach moderate to severe in the middle school. There seems to be lots of jobs in that area.
     
  4. ciounoi

    ciounoi Cohort

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    Nov 9, 2012

    Although I can't speak for Ohio, I do know that most of the Northeast has way too many special ed teachers. Unfortunately, just about everyone has the same idea you do. :(

    The vast majority of my interviews for special ed teaching positions were for either emotional support or learning support at the middle or high school level. If you do get a special ed license, you will want to make sure you are highly qualified (I think each state defines this a different way) to teach middle school/high school special ed to make yourself more marketable.
     
  5. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    Nov 10, 2012

    I agree with the other posters.

    Middle school is probably your best bet, EBD specifically, I would even say high school is a safe bet in that category.

    You really should try to work as a para or sub in it though before you start your program. I feel like I'm beating a dead horse, but it takes a very special person to not burn out on students with severe EBD.

    If you can handle possibly being spit on, punched, kicked, writing FBAs and BIPs like your life depends on it, etc. - it may be for you. :)

    Honestly though, 80%+ burnout rate in EBD teachers within 5 years. Try it out, don't assume you'll beat the odds. There's a reason those job openings exist, because, as I said, it takes a special person to keep up with it. Like any kiddos, I'm sure some will be great, but you're guaranteed to run into one or two that hit you (some physically and some metaphorically) the wrong way every single day.
     
  6. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Nov 10, 2012

    I definitely agree with other posters. The days of sped being an easy place to find a job are totally over, especially in Ohio. I'm originally from Ohio. I have a dual endorsement in elementary and special ed. I applied all over the entire state after graduating and didn't even get a single interview that was just for a mild/moderate elementary job. I had to move all the way across the country to get something. Assuming you want to stay in Ohio, your best bet would be to look into doing EBD. That's the only thing I really saw a lot of openings for. I went on one interview in central Ohio that was posted as a mild/moderate elementary position. When I got to the interview, they informed me that it was really a severe EBD position and then spent the next 30 minutes basically trying to convince me that I was right for the job (which I had NO interest in) so I would guess they were pretty desperate.
     

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