Thinking about relocating from Ohio to SF Bay area, what's the job market like there?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by hubbopolis, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. hubbopolis

    hubbopolis Rookie

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    Aug 28, 2014

    (edit: looks like I posted this to the wrong forum, should have been in Job Seekers, sorry! feel free to move)

    Hi folks,

    My wife has been teaching for 9 years in Ohio (is certified for either K-8 or 1-8, can't remember exactly) I'm in the middle of an interview process for an IT job in Mountain View, and I want to start doing a bit of research on her behalf in the rather unlikely event that an offer is extended to me.

    Based on what I've seen so far, there is at least some reciprocity between CA and OH, so it seems like she might be able to at least do some work without additional training. I'm just wondering how difficult it will be to land a job. From what I've seen there are a number of private schools in the area (primarily in response to the wild gradients in real-estate prices), and I don't think she would be entirely opposed to that option.

    Any thoughts or suggestions you might have are appreciated.

    Thanks!
     
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  3. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Aug 28, 2014

    For elementary teachers with a multiple subject credential, the job market is rather saturated. For the right position (middle school or high school math or science) it's rather easy to find a job. That said, most of the people I knew from my credentialing program didn't have much trouble landing a job.

    If your wife taught k-8, and wants to focus on grades 6-8, you want to make sure her credential can be applied to middle school in California (which is single subject and not multiple subject).
     
  4. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Aug 29, 2014

    The elementary market in CA is definitely saturated, but the Bay Area seems to post a lot of jobs each year. Pay in the Bay Area is generally not great compared to cost of living, though, just FYI.

    However, it is the end of August. I think most NorCal schools have already gone back. So for THIS year, I'm not sure what would be available. Next year she would have much better luck.
     
  5. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Sorry if it's off-topic, but I'm just really curious: how do people actually live in the Bay area? The rent is enormous, how can even 2 people on a teacher salary afford it, let alone people who have lower paying jobs, such as working retail, etc?
    I've seen the rent 2-5 times higher than other areas.
     
  6. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    I've always assumed that most households in the Bay Area have at least one member making $$$$. Two people with teacher salaries could probably afford a one bedroom apartment...

    It's even worse than SoCal, and I lived in Orange County and an expensive area of LA County. Bay Area prices are shocking even to me!
     
  7. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    When I went to SF last year I was shocked by the rent prices, I spent some time on Craigslist in disbelief.
    Here in the Central Valley, I'm renting a 3 br / 2 ba house, with a 2 car garage and a pretty big backyard with several trees for $1100. Something like this in San Diego would be $1800 - $2500 (or much more in more expensive areas). In SF this would go for something like $5000 or even more.
    There is just no way I could live in a house, even if I had a husband who was a teacher or made similar salary.
    It's just so strange, and based on what I've seen the teacher salaries are not any more than in other areas.
     
  8. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    Aug 29, 2014

    I used to live in Ohio, and I live in South Carolina now.

    I looked into moving to San Francisco several times, but I usually give up because the cost of living is so high, and they don't pay teachers well until you have several years of experience in the system and have lots of graduate credits. That is according to the salary schedules I've seen.
     
  9. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    We live in smaller areas. I pay 1100 for a 1br that is in a town 45 minutes away from the city by car but still considered the bay area. Speaking of which the bay area is very large and includes a great price range depending on the burb you land in.
     
  10. daisycakes

    daisycakes Companion

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    I moved to the bay area with a license from NY. One thing to consider is that, before your wife can be eligible for any job whatsoever, she will need to receive a CLAD credential by taking 3 3-credit courses. They are expensive and take several months, potentially forcing you to miss a hiring season.

    Also, I am a teacher in the bay area and it is super-expensive. I would move out of the area if my SO didn't make significantly more.
     
  11. mathteachertobe

    mathteachertobe Cohort

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    I am making ends meet, but I bought a condo in 99 and am paying under 1100/month for it. The peninsula often pays better, though the districts also want more experience. To teach anywhere in CA you need ELA authorization, which is the CLAD daisycakes refers to. I know of some districts that have hired people without it, giving them a year to complete it, but for Multiple Subject credential jobs, I think that's less likely to happen.

    If you are in the Mountain View area, San Jose, Santa Clara, eastern parts of other peninsula cities are all likelier to be hiring. My recommendation is to see what is actually needed to transfer the credential, and get your ducks in a row, should you get an offer.
     
  12. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    I believe the California Teachers of English Learners exam (go to www.ctcexams.nesinc.com and look for CTEL) is still an option for obtaining the ELA authorization; it's a computer-based exam, so it can be taken out of state, but it's given in specific testing date windows rather than year round. A strong foundation in pedagogy is definitely an asset.
     
  13. Harper

    Harper Companion

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    Aug 30, 2014

    This.

    Most of us do not live in the City. There are plenty of smaller cities north, east, and south to look at. And if you go a bit further, there are suburbs that are more reasonable. That said, is it still more expensive than other places - often, yes. But the Bay Area is a great place to be! Commuting is a way of life for many of us, but that should be a major consideration before making the leap.

    As to OP, Teacher Groupie is right, you can test out of CLAD, but it is not a cakewalk of a test. My friend just relocated from Ohio, and she is going through he process now. I took the CLAD classes online; it took about six months total because I only took one at a time. Private schools may hire you without having it, but no public school in the Bay is likely to extend that offer unless they are really desperate. Also, salaries vary widely depending on district, so do your research! This holds true for middle school positions. In my experience, middle schools want multi-subject with add-on authorizations or single subject. Often dual authorization is requested (English and Social Studies usually go together, Math and Science sometimes do as well.)

    Good luck with everything!

    Harper
     
  14. daisycakes

    daisycakes Companion

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    I do not live in San Francisco either. I moved to a nice suburb 4 years ago and pay 1350 for rent. However, if I moved now I wouldn't be able to afford another place in neighborhood because prices have risen so steeply. My bf and I went to look at a place in my street that was being advertised a a 2 br. It was exactly twice my rent. The 2nd bedroom turned out to be a breakfast nook, so it was essentially the same as my place but with more storage and no washer and dryer, but twice as much!

    Also, those tests are actually a series of 3 tests you have to pass. I had a friend take them and it took over a year to pass them all and he didn't have a job until he did (even though he went to Stanford and an Ivy League). Another friend was initially hired after the school year started in a lts position but hasn't been able to find anything since then without the ell authorization. Both of these friends are English teachers and had trouble passing these 3 tests.
     
  15. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    There was lively discussion of CTEL on the Other Tests subforum when it first came out. A decent background in linguistics helps a lot. Diaz-Rico & Weed's The Cultural, Linguistic, and Academic Diversity Handbook is very helpful - and is also a good reference to hang on to.
     
  16. hubbopolis

    hubbopolis Rookie

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    Sep 10, 2014

    Hi folks!!! I'm sorry for bailing on this thread, I got a bit busy and just remembered that I posted it.

    I want to thank all of you for the input, it is very helpful! If we do make the move it will be in the context of a new job for myself that will cover all the bills, but not by some fantastic margin. Most of the jobs I would be a candidate for in the area pay well on paper, but 40% or more come from stocks and bonuses, neither of which are useful for financing a mortgage.

    I'm definitely going to tell my wife to take a look at CLAD and CTEL. She'll probably stay here in Ohio for six months or so while I get things settled in CA, so we wouldn't realistically try to look for a job until next school year anyway.

    I do have a quick add-on question. She's currently got her masters plus some additional classes. This has been a detriment to finding a job with a new district in Ohio, as schools would rather not pay the 'masters tax' over what they could pay a new grad with a bachelor's degree. Would you anticipate the same issue exists in CA?

    Thanks!
     
  17. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Again, this depends on the subject she teaches. If she is in a saturated subject and the district is looking to save money, they might pass her over. However if she has a good amount of experience along with that master's degree it might make her a very desirable candidate.

    I just think districts are more leery of hiring brand new teachers who got their Master's degree in education before they've started teaching, because of the high turnover of new teachers in general.
     
  18. hubbopolis

    hubbopolis Rookie

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    Sep 11, 2014

    Great perspective, thank you!
     
  19. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    I'll throw my two cents in. ;)

    I moved from MI out to SF (heart of the city) about 7 years ago. I had no trouble moving both of my credentials-multiple subject k-8 and single subject 6-8 (science/ELA). I had a year to complete the CLAD after being hired. I took a DVD course through San Deigo University and it took about 3 months to watch the 120 hours and write the essays. It would have taken much less time if I hadn't put it off until the end.

    I was able to count those college credits on my salary scale, so it was a win/win.

    Working in the San Francisco public schools, I made 50k as a third year teacher (2 years in MI, first year in CA). I was able to bring in a few thousand extra serving on a committee. Health care was fine. My husband works in advertising-nothing major-and we were able to afford a $2700 one-bedroom with no problems. We didn't own a car (no parking anyhow) and we got to enjoy the entertainment and eating out.

    I think what people in other areas don't realize is that you just don't have extra toys if you live in a high-rent area. My friends in MI that make much, much less than us have a 3 bedroom house they own, a boat, several cars, take lots of vacations, etc. We just don't. We'll be renting for many years and we take small vacations and that's that. I loved living in and right next to the city for all those years, but now we're a few hours south so we can be closer to my husband's family. Dh took a paycut to join us down here and I make less in this public school system, but it's all good. We still rent, but we get more for our money (only $2500 for a 3 bedroom ;) ) and it's a small-town feel.

    If you are working in the tech industry, you both should be just fine. Her degree should transfer pretty easily, and she can whip through the CLAD DVDS through San Diego University. ;)
     
  20. hubbopolis

    hubbopolis Rookie

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    Sep 18, 2014

    Awesome and informative post, thank you!!!
     
  21. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    (For the record, that's the University of San Diego, a private institution with Catholic roots, not to be confused with the University of California at San Diego and San Diego State University, both of which are public institutions.)
     
  22. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    Exactly, TeacherGroupie. I think that's why the course is so 'easy'-you just order the DVDs, they send them to you in the mail, you watch and write up the essays, send it all back and get your transcript. Easy peasy, but boring as heck. ;)
     

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