The RICA...

Discussion in 'Other Tests' started by WarriorPrncss, Dec 14, 2016.

  1. WarriorPrncss

    WarriorPrncss Companion

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2014
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    28

    Dec 14, 2016

    Hi all...
    I took the RICA... and scored 217. I'm wondering if having it re-scored is worth the time and money, or if I should study more and re-take it?

    My breakdown is as follows:
    Domain 1: ++++
    Domain 2: ++
    Domain 3: ++
    Domain 4: ++
    Domain 5: +++
    Case Study ++
     
  2.  
  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,165

    Dec 15, 2016

    I'd put the time and money into studying more, frankly: the number of times in the last two decades that an A to Z post has reported that score verification has resulted in an upward shift of a test taker's score, I can count on the fingers of one hand. And have fingers left over.

    Good job picking up enough points in domain 5, comprehension, to earn +++. That's the second most important of the five domains. The most important - because it accounts for more multiple-choice points than any other - is domain 2, word analysis.

    Did your case study get marked as coming up short on "identifying", or "describing", or "explaining"?
     
  4. WarriorPrncss

    WarriorPrncss Companion

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2014
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    28

    Dec 15, 2016

    Case Study was marked as lacking is describing activities... which I thought I had done sufficiently. Since I was told structure wasn't as important I even bulleted: Problem, Strategy, Why it Will Work. I guess it wasn't so great.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,165

    Dec 15, 2016

    "Describing" is a pretty common problem area. Were you using reading-instruction terminology?
     
  6. Jsasss

    Jsasss Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2016
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 15, 2016

    I received my results yesterday too and earned the same score of 217.

    My breakdown was...
    Domain 1: +++
    Domain 2: ++
    Domain 3: ++
    Domain 4: ++
    Domain 5: +++
    Case Study: ++
    * Describing instructional strategies and/or activities

    Needless to say I was SHOCKED because I felt good about this exam. Especially the case study since in review classes and studying that was my strongest area. I did the case study first and used terminology, strategies, and activities. I left feeling confident in the case study expecting no less than +++. I wanted to get it verified too, but if the scorers know it's being verified and not another test I have a difficult time believing they will score without bias since I can't imagine an institution refunding the $50 and missing the opportunity of gaining the retake fee while admitting they made a mistake.
     
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,165

    Dec 15, 2016

    I do know of a case in which score verification worked - the guy's original CSET score report showed UB (=blank) for all the constructed responses on a subtest, when he KNEW he'd answered them all; it turned out that someone else's constructed responses had been linked to his account, and in fairly short order Pearson ruled in his favor. But this might have been when some or most of Pearson's California tests were still paper-based, and I think there was additional evidence of irregularity at the test site.

    With that said, hugs.

    Both of you, please analyze the word "beautiful" for me. Start with domain 2, word analysis: how many different ways can "beautiful" be analyzed? How many different categories can it be said to occupy? Do likewise for domains 3 through 5. Write as though this were a RICA question. (Yes, I know RICA doesn't have a question like this. It doesn't matter: what does matter is your grasp of the concepts and your willingness to play with them.)
     
  8. Jsasss

    Jsasss Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2016
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 15, 2016

    Although this isn't written properly for a RICA question, I will say where my mind went on when analyzing the word "beautiful" with such broad instructions. For word analysis I would focus on vowel digraphs, such as -ea, free morphemes (beauty), and bound morphemes (-ful). Or I could focus on syllabic blending and sound segmentation using part-to-whole instruction. A mix and match game using root words and affixes or sound bingo will aid in decoding and listening comprehension. To build fluency I could model and use repeated readings containing the word that can be read with a partner allowing me to monitor rate and accuracy. If a decodable book was available using the word "beautiful" that would be useful. Using a word wall so the child is exposed to environmental print and has constant exposure to the word can build the vocabulary term. If I was directly teaching beautiful as a specific word I would have the student focus on the context surrounding the word, making guesses to the definition or using semantic maps to teach the meaning and activate prior knowledge. Relating word analysis and vocabulary I would use morphology analysis to help determine the meaning (beauty is a huge hint), and relating vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension I would instruct contextual analysis and have the student vizulize the sentence to make an educated guess.

    This is just what came to mind when first analyzing on the top of my head. Obviously responses would be more organized and in depth depending on the specific question regarding the grade, strengths and weaknesses of a student.
     
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,165

    Dec 16, 2016

    Okay, I didn't ask you for activities or grade levels. I asked you to analyze a word. (One of TeacherGroupie's rules of test taking: Answer the question that is asked.) Analysis is literally the act (-s) of breaking (-lys-) something up (ana-) into its parts.

    You did analyze "beautiful" into morphemes, "beauty" and "-ful". Tell me what category of word analysis that is. (I will accept either of two answers and also give you the one you don't give me: teachers need to recognize both.)

    You mentioned the term "vowel digraph". To what category of word analysis does that term belong? What does "vowel digraph" mean? What does the vowel digraph <ea> generally do? Is <ea> doing that in this word?

    You mentioned syllabic blending. For this word, what does that mean? What kind of word analysis does that represent? Does it represent the same kind of word analysis as sound segmentation does?
     
  10. Jsasss

    Jsasss Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2016
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 16, 2016

    And one of MY rules is actually reading a persons response, hence when I said "Although this isn't written properly for a RICA question, I will say where my mind went...."

    I would categorize the word in morphemic analysis. The vowel digraph -ea is the 2 vowel letters that spell a sound (in this case a long e). I would categorize that as phonics. Syllabic blending for this word would be to break it into the 3 syllabals (probably difficult for this word considering the spelling) but syllabic blending I would categorize in phonemic awareness. To be honest I am not sure if it would represent the same kind of word analysis as sound segmentation, I think so, but honestly I am not sure. ***Again this is on the top of my head, but this was difficult. Especially after a long day I don't feel confident in my response.
     
  11. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,165

    Dec 17, 2016

    Analyzing "beautiful" as "beauty" and "-ful" is generally called structural analysis in educational circles; it can also be called morphology.

    The vowel digraph <ea> is indeed part of phonics; it often spells long e, yes, though of course it's less commonly pronounced short e (as in "bread"). Analyzing "beautiful" as containing long e commits a person to analyzing it as having FOUR syllables, bea-u-ti-ful, but as you've correctly noted, it has three: beau-ti-ful. That being the case, that long U vowel has the decidedly untransparent spelling <eau>. This makes "beautiful" a non-decodable sight word - and that's a term you need to know, and one that is also part of phonics. (Technically, <eau> would have to be called a trigraph - it has three letters, yes? - but reading instruction methodology courses tend not to go there.)

    "Blending" always and only means putting things together; "syllabic blending" would refer not to a kid taking "beautiful" apart into syllables but rather pulling the syllables together to make the word. Anything having to do with syllables as heard, or with onsets and rimes, or with word accent or sentence intonation - also known as prosody - is phonological awareness. If you're not sure what a rime is, ask. If you're not sure what the rime of "rime" is, ask.

    Phonemic awareness is, literally, awareness of phonemes. ("Phonemic" = phoneme + -ic.) Phonemic awareness is best thought of as the special case of phonological awareness that has to do with individual phonemes, one by one. What makes a phoneme a phoneme is that swapping it out for a different phoneme gives one a different word: we know that /w/ and /h/ are phonemes because we know that "we" and "he" are distinct words. Phonemic awareness includes segmentation, or the ability to recognize the three phonemes in the spoken word "fish"; kids master segmentation after they've mastered phoneme isolation ("Whose name begins with ssss? Sam's name begins with sss"), phoneme identification ("What's the first sound in 'zoo'? Zzzz"), and phoneme blending ("What word is /m/ /a/ /t/? 'Mat'"). "Beautiful" consists of seven phonemes; the consonants are /b/, /t/, /f/, and /l/, and there are three vowels that educators tend to write /yoo/, /i/, and /u/.
     
  12. Jsasss

    Jsasss Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2016
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 18, 2016

    Thank you. Do you have any recommendations for the case study of how to improve describing instructional strategies/activities?
     
  13. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,165

    Dec 19, 2016

    Choose an age group, a plausible reading need for that age group, and an instructional strategy that you like for that age group and reading need, and I'll help you work out what you'd need to say about it.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Mrs. K.,
  2. Jeremy Provost,
  3. miss-m,
  4. Backroads
Total: 366 (members: 4, guests: 333, robots: 29)
test