The one question I was stumped on! :(

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Aspiringinstruc, May 28, 2013.

  1. Aspiringinstruc

    Aspiringinstruc Rookie

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    "What is your behavior management plan?" What should I have said?
     
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  3. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I answered that I would of course adopt any school policies and programs necessary, but in my previous position I used or did X, Y, Z. There isn't a right or wrong answer, really. What is your plan?

    :)
     
  4. Aspiringinstruc

    Aspiringinstruc Rookie

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    My plan is to set classroom rules and have consequences if students don't follow the rules and follow through with them. Also to have incentives for students who do follow the rules..and hopefully this encourages good classroom behavior. Is this response good?
     
  5. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Basically they're asking how you have your classroom management setup. When I was asked a similar question, I explained that I have expectations and procedures in place that are clearly communicated and taught (and retaught if needed). I also explained what kind of reward system I have in place (class reward and individual reward) and consequences. And I mentioned that of course what has worked for me in the past would have to be adjusted to be in sync with the school's consequences / reward system. They really seemed to have liked it. (well, I got the job :) )
     
  6. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    You will likely be asked this question, or a similar one, at every job interview. I recommend coming up with a detailed plan. Saying rewards and consequences is too generic. WHAT rewards? WHAT consequences?

    I bumped up an interview question thread, too. It is in the job-seekers forum if you want to see some other recent questions.
     
  7. Aspiringinstruc

    Aspiringinstruc Rookie

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    I will be a first year teacher I really have no plan yet :(
     
  8. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Have you student taught?
     
  9. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I suggest researching different plans. Before I started my first year, I was full of ideas and determined to use the one I wanted. The rest of my team used an economy and I shunned it. Guess what I use know? An economy :lol: (And they don't anymore!)
     
  10. Mommyserenity

    Mommyserenity Devotee

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    I usually try to do some research on the school prior to my interviews to see what the school uses, if any, management programs. Our school uses Love and Logic in the classrooms...other schools may leave it more to individual teachers and others have other programs they prefer. You can always try to express what you might have used in the past, even as a student teacher, but how you'd link it to their preferred management protocol.
     
  11. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    This is a great incentive to start looking through some of the archives here about Behavior Management. Depending on the situation, there are some great systems you can learn (Love and Logic, Whole Brain) and then there's self-made ways of getting students through the day without a mishap and with much engagement. Time to start researching!
     
  12. teach42

    teach42 Comrade

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    I don't mean to throw more salt on the wound but I cannot believe you would ever consider going to an interview unprepared for or not expecting that question.
     
  13. TeachTN

    TeachTN Comrade

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    When people just graduate from college and start on the interview circuit, they most likely have no idea what to expect to be asked on an interview. I know I did not find this website until after my first few interviews and definitely had no idea what to expect. We learn from our mistakes and know what to expect for the future.
     
  14. Aspiringinstruc

    Aspiringinstruc Rookie

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    Is it ok to say: " I plan to adapt to any school rules or procedures set in place first. I will have my classroom rules posted in the classroom and I will review those with my students the first day of school. I will also have consequences set in place for students who don't follow the rules such as a phone call home or note home, etc. I will also have incentives for students that do follow the rules such as lunch with the teacher, pizza parties, etc. .....is this not a good answer!??
     
  15. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    How will you organize these consequences/rewards?
     
  16. Aspiringinstruc

    Aspiringinstruc Rookie

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    when i subbed i had all the incentives that they could get on a poster board and they would have to buy it with school buck which they received from good behavior....consequences will be in order if I have to move their clip down once its a warning..twice...minutes off recess...3 times call home? is this ok
     
  17. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Could some of you list specific rewards and consequences you have used? I'm always looking for good examples and I'm sure others could use some concrete examples as well, especially new job seekers.

    It would be helpful if you could also list the age/grade level you teach and if your school is different from a traditional setting. Thanks for your help.
     
  18. nyteacher29

    nyteacher29 Comrade

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    i teach 7th and i break my consequences down into positive and negative (a consequence does not have to be bad). postive consequences include reward tickets (whcih can be "cashed" in for edu prizes such as pen. pencil, highlighter, notepads, erasers, etc) to verbal recongi., a good phone call home, or even a certificate of excellence. negative consequences are the usual (phone call home, meeting with dean, detention, gym detention, etc)

    i know some teachers put names on the board of those students who are not behaving, however, i am not a fan of this. i was terrified in 4th grade because my teacher would do that.
     
  19. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Thanks for the examples, nyteacher.

    I have to say I've found "names on the board" to have different levels of effectiveness.

    When I did my student teaching, the school would have students write their own name on the board for behavior infractions along with a behavior "check". The teacher would put a two letter code by the check to describe exactly what the behavior had been. The "checks" were counted at the end of the grading period. The school would schedule a "reward activity" at the end of each grading period for the entire middle school. This could be anything from a field trip to a movie. Students with too many checks were not allowed to participate in the reward activity.

    As a teacher (at the same school the following year), I would write the name of students missing work on the board along with the assignments they were missing. This was done more as a daily reminder for myself and the students rather than a punitive consequence. This way, I could remind myself at a glance who still needed to turn in assignments.

    Both of these examples had only moderate success. Some students did not care at all about writing their own names on the board for behavior and even treated it as a joke. The school adopted a different policy during the last half of that year after I finished my student teaching.

    My list of missing work had some success, because students would say "I have that in my locker". Ok, then bring it to me and let me see it so I can give you credit for it. It did NOT really prompt them to do the missing work on their own, so after given them several days to do the work themselves, I would schedule a day when they had to stay in from recess and complete the missing assignments.

    However, as a substitute teacher, I've always said the most powerful classroom management tool I have is learning the names of the students as quickly as possible. When I can call on (or call down) a student by name, that gets their attention in a hurry.

    I did use the "names on the board" one time as a sub for a class in which several students (all members of the track team) continued talking among themselves after being asked to stop several times. So I finally just stopped asking and started writing each of their names on the board. The room got quieter with each name I added. When I was done, one of the "leaders" of the group asked "What does it mean if our name is written on the board?" I said "Mr. Regular Teacher will explain that when he returns on Monday." The room was pin-drop silent for the rest of the period.
     
  20. Mommyserenity

    Mommyserenity Devotee

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    Just be sure the school is okay with incentives before you bring that idea into play during an interview. I know our school allows things like working towards a class day to eat outside or in the classroom etc...but does not allow treasure boxes or things of that nature. You can always say you will adapt your class management plans to fit the personality make up of your individual class since different groups react differently to different approaches.
     
  21. DKM

    DKM Rookie

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    The 2 keys on managing a classroom are building positive relationships with the students and being consistent with enforcing the rules. You want to earn the respect of your kids before they decide to respect your classroom rules and you as a person.

    My Consequence Plan:
    Step 1: Verbal warning
    Step 2: Planner taken w/ signature (we have infraction logs in our planners... children who got 16 sigs got s referral... 8 was a parent contact. You can right name on the board)
    Step 3: 2 signatures, Detention Hall

    Since many schools don't have the PBIS system that I have... I would keep a class roster checklist (renew it every quarter) of how many times a kid acted up in class, document it with dates, contact parent if it exceeds to 5. 3 times would be a lunch detention.
     
  22. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    One school I worked with used a Behavior Logbook for each homeroom. The teacher created a log sheet for every student in their homeroom, then assigned someone to carry the Logbook to class each day. When a student had an infraction, the teacher of that class would write a short description of the behavior and the consequence being given, then the student would have to sign and place their initials on the line by the teachers.

    The great thing was this automatically created detailed documentation of every infraction by every student, including date and class. When a student received 3 infractions, the teacher called the parents, which was also documented in the Logbook. So any teacher could see at a glance what infractions a student had committed, what consequences had been issued, when and how the parents had been contacted (if necessary), etc.

    When a behavior mgt system requires X number of infraction before an office referral, it can be easy to lose count, forget infractions or just not realize the student has passed that mark. With the Logbook, each teacher could instantly see if a student was approaching the number necessary for a referral.
     
  23. DKM

    DKM Rookie

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    I see you teach in North Carolina... that's where I'm at too. I wonder if it's a state thing. I taught in other states and they don't use infraction logbooks like NC does.
     
  24. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I'm not in NC but we used logbooks. Loved them!
     
  25. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Not a state thing. I've never heard of it.
     

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