The Job Search After Resigning to Avoid Non-renewal

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by rpickles, May 16, 2015.

  1. rpickles

    rpickles Rookie

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    May 16, 2015

    I haven't posted at all since last summer when I was searching for a teaching job after graduation with my degree in Early Childhood Education last year. I'm looking for advice from people who have been through a similar situation or known someone going through a similar situation. I'd also be extremely interested in hearing from administrators.

    Without going in to specifics too much, I taught 5th grade this year at a Title I school. It was my first year teaching. My students included students with disabilities, English language learners, advanced math students, EIP kids, and kids with BIPs. I had no prior experience with special education or ESOL at all. Needless to say, I struggled through the year, particularly with classroom management. Although I did receive some "Needs Improvements" on brief observations, I received all "Proficients" in my formal observations. All observations were unannounced. I was told in December by my principal that if she had to make a decision right then, she would not choose to renew my contract at the end of the year and that I needed to improve consistently to change her mind. I was not put on any sort of PDP. After receiving all "Proficient" scores on my last observation of the year from an AP, I breathed a sigh of relief. THEN, I was observed again (one more time than any other teacher) by my principal and she gave me a "Needs Improvement" in classroom management. Her comment was that, "Students should read aloud classroom norms before beginning an activity." I was told at the end of February that she would not renew my contract, and she advised me to resign within the next week to avoid that. Officially, I resigned for personal reasons.

    I'm sorry, I tried to be brief, but it was still really long...it's been a crazy year. This week is the last week of school, and I'll be moving out of my classroom. Over the next few weeks, I will be adding Special Ed General Curriculum and ESOL endorsements to my certification.

    My question is: How can I market myself to potential employers? If you've been through a similar situation, how did you move forward? Can anyone at least give me hope?

    I'm not ready to leave the profession after one year. I know that if I can land an interview, I have a good chance at the job. I'm just concerned that I won't even make it to the interview stage...:help:
     
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  3. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    May 17, 2015

    Cast a wide net. Go to job fairs, network with other teachers, etc. Especially with high needs endorsements, you should find something. Don't be afraid to take a chance on a different grade level. I was non-renewed as a Primary teacher and took a 6th grade job because I was desperate. It ended up being the BEST move...Primary was a bad fit for me!
     
  4. rpickles

    rpickles Rookie

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    May 17, 2015

    Thank you both for the responses and kind words! I guess more than anything I just need encouragement that everything is going to be okay.
     
  5. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    May 17, 2015

    If you haven't applied to many districts yet, get the lead out! You'll need to be very proactive. Good luck.
     
  6. Mr.history

    Mr.history Cohort

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    May 17, 2015

    Hmm... Not sure how else to say this:
    Either you got screwed out of your job, or your not telling the whole story.

    I'm from the same state as you. Even with the new TKES eval system you cannot be denied a contract simply because you got a Needs Improvement on a walk through/formative. The school would still have to jump through the hoops of putting you on a improvement plan, doing write ups, ect. I have a dunce teacher at my school who has gotten quite a few bad scores on walk throughs and they are still coming back next year.

    Did you get pressured to resign and the principle said they wouldn't go through the motions of denying you a contract? If so you probably should have stuck it out if they didn't do anything until your last evaluation. They probably still couldn't have not offered you a contract. Or did something more serious happen?

    Anyway if you did in fact get taken for a ride, that really stinks and I wish you the best of luck. Teaching is hard and even after 2(knock on woods, still have 2 weeks left) pretty successful years, I'm still feeling like I'm learning the ropes sometimes.
     
  7. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    May 18, 2015

    Same situation happened to me and I was able to find a teaching job afterwards. Get out there and apply to as many job postings as you're qualified for and good luck!
     
  8. rpickles

    rpickles Rookie

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    May 18, 2015

    @Mr.history: I'm not leaving anything out. On my summative assessment, I have Proficients in every category except "Positive Learning Environment," which is basically management. I was never told anything negative about any other area throughout the year. I was told that she would not renew my contract if I didn't resign. She's done the same to at least one other first year teacher this year, and from what I've heard she's done it in the past as well. Thinking back, I wish I'd gotten with a union rep, but I was embarrassed and scared. I wasn't put on a PDP or anything. Just told that she wouldn't choose to rehire me. That's the whole story. (Not trying to be defensive or anything, it's just that really is it, unfortunately. I guess you live and you learn...)

    @smalltowngal: It's good to hear that you were able to find a job. Thank you!
     
  9. ahodge79

    ahodge79 Companion

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    May 18, 2015

    Were you a temporary employee?
     
  10. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    May 18, 2015

    Been there done that, took me seven years to find a new full time job.

    Be willing to look outside your area, to travel a bit if needed. When this kind of thing happens, with this kind of principal you end up in a position that the principal can bad mouth you. I kept applying in my immediate area and got no where. All of my interviews were outside my area, all a rather long drive. I missed out on one job only because I told them if the needed a SPED good at Algebra I wasn't the gal for them....because it was true. That guy thanked me for my honesty and told me that was the only reason he didn't hire me. (me and algebra II get a long like an ice cream cone in hell....)

    Anyway, once I gave up on looking in my small corner of the world and expanded my net, I had tons of schools willing to hire me. Some I was happy to go with, and some I changed my mind on moving to that location.

    BUT the key I found was presenting it as a personal reason, the one I gave was directly related to a serious car accident I had just before the end of the school year. My hands were injured making it hard to teach, that was true, but not enough to make me quit. However, it sounded a lot better than my principal was an arse, wanted me out, and released private medical information to the staff to humiliate me then decided to non-renew me after three years.

    I wish you the best of luck, look far and wide and DO NOT GIVE UP.

    Remember, learn from what you didn't get right this year (we all need to do that) and present it in an interview as a learning experience.
     
  11. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    May 19, 2015

    You must work in a really happy place if you think that administrators don't bully people into resigning. It happens.

    As for the lady who searched for 7 years, try competing in a market that pulls thousands of applicants per position like she did. I live in the same state. I make it a habit of asking (if possible), how many applicants they had. My highest was over 6000. Six THOUSAND. The lowest I ever heard was over 500 and this was in a very rural area.
     
  12. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    May 19, 2015

    And you missed my point. In saturated areas (the OPs area is not like mine, but I do know of people who have struggled getting jobs there.), being non-renewed or bullied into resigning pretty much can ruin someone's life. Take wldywall. It took her 7 years to find a new job. They don't have to call other principals. The chances of beating out 5,999 other applicants- including family members, former student teachers, parents of students, and who ever else has a connection- are slim enough even with the highest praises.
     
  13. chasisaac

    chasisaac Comrade

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    May 20, 2015

    The number one thing that holds us back is us.

    Can you move? There are lots of other states that need all kinds of teachers. Where I live one of the top schools received an average of 12 applications for ALL positions over the course of one year. This includes subs, parapro, custodians, and all other hourly people. My former school receives about three or four for every position.

    Can you pick up extra endorsements quickly that are in need. Not sure what GA rules are for extra certs areas. I started off in social studies but I do not coach. I moved to English and now to MS Math and Science. I am quite happy.
     
  14. chasisaac

    chasisaac Comrade

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    May 21, 2015

    Just to provide punch to this statement. States that do not allow it are: MN, IL, SC, WV, NY, and I think two more. They require at least 18 credits.

    Every other state (I think) requires a state test. Most of those who use the Praxis test the numbers really are not that high.

    I studied for mine in MS math and science (paper version) for two solid months. Passed for all states no problem. The amount of helps are amazing.
     
  15. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    May 21, 2015

    Michigan requires coursework.
     
  16. slippers

    slippers Rookie

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    May 21, 2015

    Well, as a biology and chemistry teacher I would say yes there are alot of openings but you need to ask yourself why. I have been certified since 2011 and I have taught one year for chemistry and then I only lasted a few weeks at another school. Ack !

    I love to teach these subjects and I am a good teacher and so now I teach at the college level part-time. It's a sad statement to say - but there it is.

    I have seen the same schools having the same openings year after year since 2011. Are there 'bad' teachers out there? or, maybe 'bad' environments. Be very careful about where you place yourself, and now I ask: is this an environment where I can be successful? I even asked a principal that question because her entire science department had left by December and she was tring to re-staff for January. Knowing I didn't want that job I asked her some hard questions ("why did all your teachers leave before Christmas?" "As a new teacher, will I be supported and helped to grow and mature as a teacher?"). She was speechless and got off the phone, but it was good to ask those questions.

    I would like to think that a good school will value valuable people and so - look for that. The right school like the right person - will want you because of who you are. That's very important and worth waiting for.
     

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