The Importance of Periodicals

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Obadiah, Nov 19, 2019.

  1. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Nov 19, 2019

    I was thinking yesterday evening of how beneficial periodicals were to me when I was a kid. I enthusiastically looked forward to reading My Weekly Reader at school. I still remember almost jumping out of my seat when Batgirl was interviewed in Junior Scholastic. At home, I received Jack and Jill and Highlights. The Sunday comics page back then was more geared toward all ages; I always enjoyed reading Mickey Mouse, Peanuts, Scamp (I think it was called) and others. At Sunday School, we always received a weekly "paper" (that's what we called it as kids) with a couple of stories in each issue. These periodicals were a positive plus in my development as a reader.
     
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  3. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Nov 19, 2019

    Do they still have these other than Scholastic?
     
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  4. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Nov 19, 2019

    Highlights is still around.

    I loved Highlights and my American Girl magazines.
     
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  5. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    I believe that the vast majority of the periodicals that were around when I was a kid are, in fact, still around - and more! Some of these are now more online, but hey, things can be printed or read online, if access to online is limited. I think that any kind of regular reading material that is age appropriate, with interesting story lines, requiring students to consider varied concepts or outcomes, needs to still be a part of our children's lives. As far as academics go, the periodicals don't have to be a part of the Scholastic material, or any other set of information. We are so lucky that we have access to reading, with questions that can help us track our comprehension, in the form of ReadWorks (all content is available), English For Everyone, Science News, Science News for Students, Live Science, Easy Teacher Worksheets, Differentiated Science Instruction, Science A-Z.com, Softschools reading comprehension, Reading Comprehension Worksheets - Teach-nology, Sports Illustrated for Students, Natural Inquirer products are produced by the USDA Forest Service, the Cradle of Forestry in America Interpretive Association (CFAIA), and other cooperators and partners. I have also been able to tap into Eric Weisstein's World of Science,
    National Geographic Magazine, OWL Magazine: ages 9-13 – Owlkids,
    Odyssey Adventures in Science Magazine - Cricket Media, material for kids 9-14, monthly,
    Zoobooks Magazine, MUSE Magazine, with an age range of 9-14, Smithsonian Tween Tribune. Also from Smithsonian: Click, Ask, Spider, Cricket, Faces, and Cobblestone, all with varied age ranges that allow for readers of all ages and abilities to find a magazine geared just for them. You'll notice that I have a heavy interest in the science magazines, as well as real life adventures. ReadWorks, of course, is valid across virtually every subject matter, as well as every age and ability level. I think that National Geographic and the Smithsonian produce top notch reading material that have a way of engaging students/readers so that they are willing to put in a little extra effort to follow the meaning of the text. I believe that students who work a little to gain complete understanding of the reading gain self satisfaction and pride in what they have accomplished. The periodicals we grew up with are still out there, but sometimes we have to do a little work to connect with them. I believe that providing reading material that is exciting, engaging, and thought provoking is worth the effort for teacher/parent, as well as the student. My parents believed strongly on stimulating the mind through reading, and I know that they scrimped on some things to make sure that my sister and I had access to reading material that would expand our view of the world, and give us concepts that were not necessarily common in middle class Missouri. I will be forever grateful to them for that.

     
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  6. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    I wish, oh, how I wish, more parents encouraged reading. I'll never forget the day Ollie's store offered free kids' books in a huge bin. I observed one boy excitedly looking through the books, while his mother impatiently stood there watching. She finally said no, no books. These were free, totally free, brand new, excellent quality books. Then there's the day the local college offers free books. The kids' section seems hardly touched.

    Compare that to the video game store at the mall. Hoooo boy! Now there are always parents in there with their kids, spending dollars upon dollars on anything that'll keep their kids quiet for awhile. But free books, nah!

    We have more reading resources, and back to my original thoughts, we have so many excellent quality kids magazines, and my area has a library in every small town, and I do have to admit, parents do bring their kids to the library--for video games and DVD's. Ninja Turtles, sponge creatures, and zip-zap-zowie games seem to be of a higher importance than old fashioned reading. I guess this is the space age. Time for kids to grow up as zombies rather than intelligent, independent thinkers. Hmmm, what if Socrates grew up over spending his time playing video games.
     
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  7. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Nov 20, 2019

    My mom would have never done that when I was a kid. I had a fully stocked bookshelf complete with Encyclopedias when I was born. My mom admits she went overboard since a newborn does not need encyclopedias LOL She just wanted me to have everything I could. My parents were NOT readers in any sense but always encouraged us.
     
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  8. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Nov 20, 2019

    My daughter brought home a Time kids yesterday and just loved it.

    My church publishes a kiddie periodical one can subscribe to, and that's also a big hit.

    I think the nature of periodicals helps with reading as it gives them something to look forward to.
     
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  9. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Nov 20, 2019

    I just bumped into one of my former students yesterday who had finished his classes in college for the day. His mom has 8 children and her and her husband barely had enough money to pay the bills. Her children were always at the very top of the class with straight As with no exceptions. The one thing this mom did right is every week--52 weeks a year, she made sure she would take her children to the library from the age of 3. If every parent took their child to the library each week, just to get books...no contests, no DVDS..just books...the change and improvement in reading for children would be greater than anything we've ever seen in education in this country.
     
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  10. Tired Teacher

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    Nov 22, 2019

    Scholastic News and Time is definitely still going. I have boxes of old Highlights! The kids still love them! The best teacher I ever had taught all lessons around these types of magazines. I was young and learned so much about current events, history, environment, writing and more. I was only in 2nd grade and still remember stuff I learned from her style of teaching. She was young, but way ahead of her time.
     

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