The hyperactive student? need help!

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by Christine3, Jan 29, 2007.

  1. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2007
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 29, 2007

    Hi everyone,
    This year has seen to be one of the hardest years for me. That is because I have one student who I just can't seem to handle and I need your advice/tips.

    In my observations she is like a "chatty Cathy". Extremely impulsive and will never stop talking. Although, She gets along well with the kids in the classroom and is very social.

    I called home in the beginning of the year with a behavior problem. She was always out of her seat, calling out, and fooling around at the wrong times. She was also always distracted by her peers. This child is a very upbeat and has tons of energy! She seems to always want to have fun and never work. She always needs my support to start a task.

    After, the phone call her behavior was improving a bit. She stopped getting out of her seat and making inappropriate remarks while i was teaching. One thing i did notice is when i talk to her she can't make direct eye contact? it seems like it hurts so much for her to do that.

    About 3 weeks later her poor behavior was back full speed. I knew she was upset about me always correcting her with things she did wrong. I don't really think she likes me at all. For example i caught her reading a book during class while i was going over directions and she just rolled her eyes when i told her to stop and slammed the book down.

    Weeks past and i knew the breaking day would come soon. . . where everything would blow up and be a mess from there.
    here is what happened:

    They were all doing a review games in separate groups when i saw she wasnt even taking part in what they were doing or paying groups she was talking to other groups and was tuning her's out... the group got mad. and she was being loud. so i called her to my desk and told her to go sit in the back of the room. she refused to and said "i want to play" so then i said or you can sit in the office instead?? so she went back. I watched her sit in the back of the room she just watched the other kids play. Then about 15 min later i heard "can i play now?" and i said yes she rejoined the group and played. But seemed very upset that i put her in TIMEOUT.
    From then on i documented everything wrong she did. Between packing up early .... leaving early. Playing with the boys hair in front of her and talking out.


    It all came down to this: A meeting with me, the counselor, her and the parents. I felt much better after this meeting and gave this student a clean slate.

    To make things shorter..... i feel its starting up AGAIN! She is still calling out and talking to the people behind her. she now sits right infront of my desk. Is that a good idea?????
    One other problem i still have is that she can't sit in her chair correctly she seems to be fidgety and always kneeling on her knees? she wont just sit down!!!!!! ugh


    PLEASE, ANY TIPS? WHAT SEAT IS THE BEST FOR THIS CHILD?
     
  2.  
  3. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2005
    Messages:
    10,120
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 29, 2007

    How old is she? Your a high school teacher I'm assuming she must be a freshman. At this age I would expect her to control her behavior. I am taking it she has no IEP or identified as LD? If not I would be giving detentions for all the times she is not paying attention. Maybe I am being a little harsh. But I tend to be extremely strict with my older students.
     
  4. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    Jan 29, 2007

    It is possible that she has ADD or ADHD and it was never diagnosed. Puberty can interact with the severity of the condition, too. Do you know if she was ever evaluated for it? Have you seen records from middle school?

    She may not be able to control herself - you probably won't ever know how much is in her control. Sit her up front, close to where you address the class. Don't allow her to participate in group activities with more than one other person for a while. Put a piece of velcro or something on the underside of her desk for her to fidget with.

    Find something that will work as a consequence. Every time she speaks out of turn, give her the consequence. Be consistent.

    I have a similar problem with my 5th graders. Several who have gotten away with self-distracting behaviors for years are, unfortunately, ingrained in self-defeating habits. Since I have a very small class, every time I see the behavior (every 5 minutes or so), I stop and say, "I'll wait for ____ to be ready." Since they're young, it works. But I just referred one student today for testing and her father agreed. It's harder at your level.
     
  5. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2007
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 30, 2007

    No she was never evaluated for it and I havn't seen records from middle school. Sometimes I do believe that she can't control herself at all. Yeah I have her right infront of my desk.

    The other day I was presenting a lesson and she had out a notebook from another class...when I looked over the kid in the back took that notebook and then the whole row got distracted and was passing it back up then she and the boy in back of her were fighting over it and they were laughing?? to me this is nonsense i don't need. or maybe she has add/adhd?? Is it too late to see?

    Your lucky the 5th graders seem to respond well. (b/c they are younger) It is very hard at my level.
     
  6. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,938
    Likes Received:
    682

    Jan 30, 2007

    Yes, I know it is. Do you have backup? Can you send her out of the room to do work in another class? Assistant principal? Anywhere? I always have that alternative and it is so important. If a student misses new material, oh well, it's his own fault. Natural consequence. She absolutely should not be allowed to disrupt the class.
     
  7. teacherlady

    teacherlady Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 30, 2007

    How many kids in your class? First, you NEED to review her records. There may be important info in there to help you understand her and her behaviors. It would be helpful to have a school psych or someone else come in on a couple of occasions and observe her in your classroom. Finding out what happens right before she misbehaves and right after she misbehaves can give you many clues. Kids who misbehave do so either to get out of doing something, to gain something they want, or because there is some internal problems,(physiological, mental, or emotional) that she is trying to deal with. How is her behavior in other classes? I imagine it is the same as with you.
    After the observation and discussing this with the observer, try and pinpoint maybe two of her most extreme behaviors and focus your attention on helping her change these. The wont go away but you can help her replace them with something more appropriate. Getting together with parents, counselor, and others to acknowledge the problems was a great idea. Continue doing that, maybe once every week or two. This will let the parents and the student know that the behaviors will not be tolerated.
    Instead of correcting her orally, try some sort of rating scale on paper at the end of each class. Call her up a minute or two before class is over and let her read it. Keep the papers for future documentation with parents, counselor, etc. DO NOT tolerate disrespect from her in any form, rolling eyes, slamming book, being off task, etc. Send her to the office immediately for disrespectfulness. If she wont go, call for someone to come and get her. On the daily notes, try to write at least one strength you noticed. You have to get her behavior under control before she will do any real learning. Does she have friends? Work for what is best for her, even if she drives you crazy. Also, she may physically be unable to sit still, who cares if she sits up on her foot as long as she's attending to the task at hand. Cut her some slack on this if possible. Your school psych could talk with you about doing a school screening for ADD/ADHD and also a home screening for the same (we do this in Kansas, I assume you have something similar). Dont give up!
     
  8. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2007
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 30, 2007

    There is about 21 kids. In some of her other classes it is the same way. I spoke to one other teacher and he said she is not that bad in his class. Although, he said she can't control her talking.

    She does NOT have any poor records from middle school what so ever. She does have many friends and seems to be quite popular?

    I do agree with the part if she is sitting up on her foot, as long as she is paying attention. Infact, when she is doing that she seems more focused. We do the same thing with the screening too.

    Also, she advoids tasks that she doesn't understand. She won't ask questions when she doesn't understand something? any tips how i can make her feel more comfortable??

    Those tips seem great! I'm going to try the rating scale soon.


    THANK YOU SO MUCH, YOUR HELP/TIPS/SUPPORT ARE GREATLY APPRICIATED!
     
  9. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2007
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 31, 2007

    I think I might be able to send her to another classroom... if that teacher has a prep period?
     
  10. teacherlady

    teacherlady Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2007
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 31, 2007

    not surprised that her behavior worsens when she cant do something or doesnt understand, the inappropriate behavior she displays is her learned coping skill. Do you do any cooperative learning in your classroom? Dr. Spencer Kagen is the guru on this topic. Don't think of cooperative learning as just sitting kids in a group, that's not it. The beauty of cooperative learning is that everyone has a job to do to make things happen, do an assignment, research a topic, etc. The best and most recent book that I own is Cooperative Learning, Structures for Teambuilding by Laurie, Miguel and Spencer Kagen. This kind of structure really might help her be more accountable to her peers instead of it being you as the one who is trying to make her accountable. Also, you must find some way to build a better relationship with this young lady. The old saying, "Students dont care what you know until they know you care" is really true. Find some connection with her and build on that. Also, finding and discussing a strength or two for her at the end of each period as I suggested earlier is key to to building something more positive also.
     
  11. ThinkOutLoud

    ThinkOutLoud Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 31, 2007

    TeacherLady, I completely agree with this! CLZTeach, this must be such a drain on you, poor thing :( Not only have you got a program to deliver to your students, but you've somehow got to do this while taming this student. Phew! But you can do it and there are certainly a lot of ways you can help this situation. I especially think building a stronger rapport with this girl is really worth the effort - even though I'm sure you don't really like her very much, I find it helpful to try and separate the bad behavior from the student. It's her behavior that's bad, not HER. I'm guessing you already know this, yet letting the girl herself know this is probably worthwhile too. Try and set aside time each day to "catch up" with her and ask about her interests, what she likes/dislikes. Do this out of class, possibly in the playground. Keep it casual so that you don't seem to be trying so hard...make it seem like you happen to "bump into her", then after awhile say how you're enjoying these little chats. You can even say to her further down the track "Oh, I'll just grab my coffee from the staffroom but I'll be right back for a chat! Save me a seat will you?" This will make her feel respected and not like a child with problems, or that you're pitying her.

    I really believe in the power of having a little pep-up with problem students before the class even begins - something like "Hmmm, it seems like you're a little fidgety at the moment, this must be so hard for you in class when you know you've got to sit down and do some work. How about I'll keep close to your desk so you can tell me when it's getting difficult to concentrate, so then I don't have to draw attention to you in front of the rest of the class. Deal?"

    Is rather idealistic, but I've used this with my own students and it works! They seem to feel good about having their special thing with the teacher. PLus they feel better understood and not written off as the "bad student" in class.
     
  12. La Profesora

    La Profesora Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2007
    Messages:
    691
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 1, 2007

    Remember your priorities. You have a class with 20 other students, not just this girl! If she is commanding half of the class period in behavior modification, then she has to shape up or ship out. It is not fair to those other kids who are getting the shaft because of this unruly girl! Make a behavior contract that states at the first sign of misbehavior or unwillingness to follow the class rules, she's in the office. THEN FOLLOW THAT! Its hard to send a kid to the office when they just open their mouth once, but she has been warned, and you owe it to the other kids to be allowed to teach. Don't let her make you miserable! You have a right to teach your 20 other students.

    Good Luck!
     
  13. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2007
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2007

    Thanks for everyone's tips and support.
    You all have great ideas!
     
  14. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2007
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 4, 2007

    Should I continue to document...?
    Are the following incidents signs of ADHD?

    -When we were going over a worksheet, I told everyone that they should be checking their answers. She was looking at classmates instead and didn't even look down at the worksheet! I had to reprimand her for talking out once.
    -Very impulsive...can't keep her hands off of the boys desk behind her.
    -Put the sheet away and packed up...when we were still going over it. (other kids started to follow her) I said to the class "please don't pack up." She continued to put her backpack on and move around in her seat.

    At the end of class I called her up to me and asked to see the worksheet. I told her that she cannot dismiss the class,needs to keep her hands of the boys desk and needs to tone it down.

    Did I handle it wrong? I just can't believe its starting once again!

    Thanks for hearing me out...
     
  15. ThinkOutLoud

    ThinkOutLoud Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2007
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 5, 2007

    my, my, my...

    Wow...you're really doing the hard yards with this girl! Although there seems to be something more going on with her (not just bad behavior), I still think there's value in using extra praise where it's due and trying to draw more attention to THAT, rather than the bad stuff. Not everyone would agree to this. If she's not doing anything worth receiving praise for, then specially design situations where she CAN be praised. After that, she could get the idea that she gets attention when she's doing good stuff too.
    Although I'm no expert, a colleague of mine IS, so I really recommend some further reading of these types of strategies and prevention techniques (it's all free stuff, with the option of more detailed resources if it's sounding like what you want.)
    Keep fighting the good fight!
    www.classroom-management.org/free1NDC.html

    www.reviewed-information.com/classroom1ndc.html
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. SharedAccountWith3,
  2. Missy,
  3. miss-m
Total: 214 (members: 3, guests: 197, robots: 14)
test