The Area in Which You Teach

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out Archives' started by Ms.Jasztal, Jul 9, 2007.

  1. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    What's it like- suburb, the middle of the city, country/rural? How many kids attend your school? Are you Title I or a special education center? Is there anything your area is known for?

    Okay, I teach in a small city in the country, but it's changing a lot because a lot of gated communities are popping up in the area. A lot of restaurants and stores are being built, though we still don't have a bookstore in our entire county to this day. I have to drive 30 minutes to get to the closest one. It's not too far from Tampa, Florida. I think about 760 students attend the school and it is Title I- we have 70% free or reduced lunch. We house special education students, and our area is known for the Weeki Wachee Mermaids (15 minutes west of our school).
     
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  3. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    My school is in the suburbs. It's about 40% free and reduced lunch I think. I believe we are on the brink of becoming Title 1, so it should happen in a few years probably. We are K-6 and we also have communication disorder classrooms. I don't think the city is really known for anything. But the schools in our district are very wide ranging. Schools range from 0% to 100% free and reduced lunch.
     
  4. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    My school is in a primarily suburban district immediately north of Houston with an enrollment around 44,000. I teach at one of two alternative campuses. My campus is for kids 17 and older (primarily) who are still classified as freshman or sophomores--the other alternative school is for severe behavior issues.

    None of the 4 main high schools in our district are Title 1 schools, although 1 could be if the kids would turn in the forms (all of the lower grade schools in its feeder pattern are Title 1). Because we are technically a "program" and not a "school", we will never be able to qualify for Title 1 status. The plus side of that is that we also are not officially held accountable to the state for test scores and the like--their home schools are. Of course, unofficially, we are held accountable by the superintendent and the school board.

    Last year we had 125 students and 13 teachers. This year we will have 200 students and 17 teachers. Our class sizes average at 13. The traditional high schools in our district all have 3500+ kids and class sizes of over 30.
     
  5. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    My school is in a rural district. We have one preschool-K school, two 1-4 school, a 5th grade center (at one elementary school), one middle school (6-8) and one high school (9-12). We also have one alternative school for grades 7-12.

    Our middle schools runs around 600 students per year. We're a Title 1 school and have been for several years. We have between 65 and 70% free and reduced lunch.

    We're 50 miles from the largest major city, but we're a WORLD away in culture and resources. I'm not sure we're known for anything. We had a train derailment here back in the winter and CNN carried that story. Other than that, we're not that newsworthy. LOL

    Our county has one sewing factory, a couple of grocery stores, and a few dollar stores. The nearest major grocery and Wal-Mart is 20 miles away in the next county. In the mid 60's to the mid 90's we had a coal processing plant and the railroad. There are a few people with the railroad now, but everything else is gone.
     
  6. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    My school is in a rapidly growing subdivision in a city of close to 80,000. We opened 5 years ago with fewer than 200 students and will be up over 750 next year in grades JK-8. We are unique in that we are a "dual-track" school--running both French Immersion and English programs. About 1/3 of our students are in the French Immersion program. We have a high ESL poplulation and have high academic needs in our English track. We don't offer Special Education services to students in French Immersion; if they are identified as requiring any type of Special Ed support they must transfer to the English track.
     
  7. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    I work in a district that is about 45 minutes south of Seattle. We are a large district wtih a wide range of students, ranging from 0%-100% free and reduced lunch. Our school is about 20% free and reduced and we have 900 students. We are not a Title I school but have some in our district. We also have special education students but in other schools (2 elementaries, I believe) we have behavioral disorder classrooms in which students are taught who have severe behavior issues. We also have an ELL program at one of our schools. Our elementary happens to be one of the larger...the smallest in the district has about 300 students.
     
  8. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    My school is in a medium-sized city. We are 92% free and reduced lunch. We are definitely a Title I school. My school serves about 330 students Pre-K-5.
     
  9. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    My district a rural district. My school is 94% Hispanic. We are 100% free lunch (97% free 3% Grant) we have just over 900 students. We are Title 1 school (& district) And we get 360 days of sunshine a year
     
  10. AMK

    AMK Aficionado

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    I teach not too far from Newark NJ. It is a very large and very diverse. My school is a Title 1 but not all of the schools in the district are. It mostly Hispanic and African American. A lot of parents and children are immigrants from Haiti,Africa and Central America.
     
  11. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jul 9, 2007

    I'm in a Catholic Jr/Sr high school (grades 6-12) on Long Island, in a suburb of NYC. We're about 35 minutes by train from Manhattan.

    Our student body of 2,550 kids, come from about 30 or 40 local public school districts, as well as a number from Queens (one of the NYC boros) They're a diverse group: economically, academically and in most other ways I can think of.
     
  12. Mrs.Gould

    Mrs.Gould Comrade

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    My school is more on the rural side. There are about 1400 students in the whole district. 99% of students are White and 35% qualify for free or reduced lunch. I'm not sure if the area where the district is located is known for anything, but where I live (about 30 minutes away) we are the Carousel Capital of the World!!:) We have also been noted for being one of the cloudiest cities in the US! :eek:
     
  13. CanadianTeacher

    CanadianTeacher Groupie

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    I have never heard of such huge schools! My first year I taught at a school with about 700 students in it and it is probably one of the largest schools in our city. It was right in the city. Now I am at a rural school 35 minutes out of the city, practically in the middle of nowhere. We have about 180 students and it's a K-8 school. Every class up to grade 6 is a split grade. I have my student list for next year and I will be teaching straight grade 7 with 17 students, (a few IEP's). The parents are very involved and it's just a really nice place to be. I really don't ever want to go back to town to teach. Most of the students are children of farmers (large number of Dutch families) who run large farming operations and so education doesn't always seem to be a really high priority, but they are almost all really nice kids and discipline problems are few. Our school is also very monocultural.
     
  14. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    We're an urban school with about 2,700 students.

    Our neighborhood is known for excessive gang activity.

    Our school is a magnet school specializing in Leadership and Law Studies.

    Our student population is 42% black, 42% Hispanic, 11% white, 5% Asian/Pacific Islander.

    We have a 40% transiency rate.

    We did not make AYP for the 05/06 school year. I think we're on the Watch List now.
     
  15. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    I am in an Urban district with about a 97% free and reduced lunch rate, we are Title one (I believe)

    We are about 70% black and the rest is split between hispanic and white students.

    We are a public school with a top ten in the nation sports program (via sports illustrated) but with a moderate failure and drop out rate.
     
  16. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    I teach in a tiny town in a rural area. We are PreK to 5th and have around 425 kids. Our parish (county to you yankees! :D) graduates about 170 kids a year. We are one of 2 major elementary schools. The other two are very small community schools. One averages about 20 kids per grade and the other about 8. We are title 1, about 70% free and reduced. Our populations is mostly white. Our major industry is logging and oil field work. High school sports are HUGE here. We have a great girls' basket ball team and softball team. Our boys sports...well they are fun to watch anyway! :) We also have a really good high school rodeo team. We are a parish without a high school, though. The school on our side of the parish was destroyed by a tornado 2 1/2 years ago. They are still rebuilding. Our kids have been attending school in an old, empty factory which was dontated to the town. On the other side of the parish the high school (the school I graduated from) was burned by a small group of students. The main building was destroyed. They are using the outer buildings for classes and will be bringing in temporary buildings this fall. Even though I will be the first to say that we are dead set in the middle of redneck country, after Katrina, I was amazed at how many homes and churches around here opened their doors to survivors. Many had just recovered from tornado damage, some were still rebuilding, but they opened their homes and hearts.
    Oh, and we lost our one and only redlight. They replaced it with a caution light.:rolleyes: :D
     
  17. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Be nice :D , since Louisiana is the only state that uses parish and not county it is not just us Yankees who might not know
    (or YankRebs since AZ was not a state then and had both northern and southern sympathizers, and we had the most western Civil War battle)
    It is funny how I have seen post on other boards talking about the separation of church and state when the word parish is used in a news article. :D
     
  18. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I work in a West Palm Beach private school. It is not one of the 'ritzy' schools with snobby families (they look down on us!).

    We have 90 students in grades K through 8. Every teacher knows just about every student's name. We would like to expand. The kids are predominantly caucasian, though my class this coming year is predominantly African American. Class sizes are small, individual needs receive much attention.

    We have a mix of kids. The principal won't admit to it, but I'd say about 30 - 40% of the kids have diagnosed or undiagnosed disabilities. Parents are usually supportive, just a few are demanding.

    We have no cafeteria, no stage, no gym. We have a fabulous art curriculum. Kids have many specials per week. (Too many.) We have clubs after school, including sports. Food is brought in daily for 'hot' lunch (pizza, salads, burgers, ziti) for those who order. Tuition is about $8,500 per year.
     
  19. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Jul 10, 2007

    4K-grade 12 all in one rural school
    2-3 sections of each grade
    SAGE K-3 (class sizes 15 or less)
    550 students total 4K-12
    70% free/reduced lunch
    title 1 reading
    Parents are mainly HS graduates or less
    10% hispanic migrant (half speak spanish)
    5% Hmong but english speaking
    rest white
    Closest major grocery store, Menards, McDonald's 35 miles away
     
  20. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    I remember when CNN spoke about the train derailment! LOL :)

    We made national news when a bus turned over on the way to school three school years ago- my first year of teaching, and two of my students were on that bus. I was shaking the entire day. I wonder if anyone remembers hearing that story.

    Ummm... our city was awarded Florida's Best Rural City in 2000, but...

    Otherwise, we're not all that newsworthy, either. :)
     
  21. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    We are looked down on, too, because back in 2000, we were a "D" school. Now we go back between "A" and "B". There are "focus" schools in our county, and it was unheard of to have a district science fair winner from our school before this previous school year. It was a great surprise.
     
  22. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Where are you in NY?
     
  23. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Can you believe that in our teeny tiny school we have had a first place in the district science fair and several 2nd or 3rds? This is for middle school. We don't have a great science lab or anything.
     
  24. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Jul 13, 2007

    do you also get mosquitos??
     
  25. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    getting burned out in pre-k/Head Start

    I am in a low-income neighborhood, working for a non-profit, federally/state funding agency. I am seriously considering a new field, as I plan for this new job in August.

    I have taught preschool in private, local day care centers, and they are all the same. Nobody wants to follow rules, lots of turnover, special treatment for familes and friends of director. They have a tendency to wear us out. Making us walk with kids and sing in 90 degree heat to the library. Coming in early, staying late. Avoiding breaks, scheduling meetings during lunch. Nobody wants to get training. Person with degree has to be in charge.(yes, that is usually me) Nobody likes person in charge. (right, nobody likes me) Little or no benefits, long term care or future in company. Glass ceiling.

    Best position was 2 1/2 days, no kids on Friday. Real time and support for doing paperwork. Second choice was pre-k in elementary building. Got better respect, benefits, and easier hours.

    Really enjoyed being a sub! sigh :confused:

    Might start fudging on my applications, and go back to being an teacher aide! :sorry:

    Having a depressing day...

    this may end up being a new thread :(
     
  26. eydie

    eydie Companion

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    My school use to be very rural but now more subdivisions are popping up since people are moving out of the city as it is becoming more crime ridden. we are a PK - 2 school with about 300 students. I usually have an average of 20 children. It is 85% white students. We are a Title One school with about 90% on free or reduced lunch. Last year I had 2 who paid full price for their lunch.
     
  27. Steph-ernie

    Steph-ernie Groupie

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    I'm also in southwest Arizona, where we get 360 days of sunshine a year and I can answer that - No. (There's no water here - thus, no mosquitos!) My city is in the guinness book of world records as being the sunniest place in the country!
     
  28. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Jul 14, 2007

    HeII it is to hot for them too Yuma isn't HeII but you can see it from here.
     
  29. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Steph-ernie we are both in Yuma ! LOL

    Read post #8 from me, we now have 3 on this bulletin board from here
     
  30. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    LOL Dave everytime I see a post saying ya'll are from Yuma all I hear is Frankie Lane singing 3:10 to Yuma.
     
  31. DaveF

    DaveF Companion

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    I commute to a K-3 school in a rural central CA. town of 15,000 people. One half of our residents are incarcerated in a med. security prison. The remaing 7500 are very poor, perhaps the poorest in CA. The town is 92% Hispanic. Some of our students moved to the town to be close to their father who is in prison.

    Kids are kids, and they all get my best effort. If I do a good job, maybe they can eventually break the cycle of poverty.
     
  32. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Jul 14, 2007

    Frankie Laine
    Date of Birth
    March, 30 1913, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    Date of Death
    February, 6 2007
    , San Diego, California, USA. (cardio-vascular disease)

    Laine's finest hits include That's My Desire (1947), Mule Train (1949), Jezebel, Cry of the Wild Goose (1950), On Sunny Side Of The Street (1951), I Believe (1953) and Moonlight Gambler in 1957. He sang the title song for the hit TV series Rawhide that starred Clint Eastwood in the early 1960s. He co-wrote We'll Be Together Again.

    from http://www.imdb.com/
     
  33. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    ah Dave...never a dull moment when you are around!
     
  34. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Love the avatar, Dave! :D
     
  35. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

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    Jul 14, 2007

    I teach in an urban/suburban district in central NJ. I say urban/suburban because my school is on the border of Trenton, NJ and we have a really diverse group of students. But the other two elem schools are very middle class and lack the gang activity right outside their windows on a daily basis. I think our total district population is about 4,500 with 525 at my school. We have 3 elementary schools K-5, one 6-8 middle school, and a 9-12 hs. Overall in the district we have about 30% on free and reduced lunch but that number is closer to about 40-45% at my particular school. My class is predominantly African Americans and a lot of our immigrants come from Haiti.
     
  36. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Jul 15, 2007

    Here in Arizona we are about to start the monsoon season.
    Which means RAIN. Our 5 days without sunshine.

    it will rain so hard that the drops will knock you down if they hit you right.
    it will rain so hard that the water will be so high that it will "wash the belly of a horse" after only 5 min of rain
    it will rain so hard that the Jackalops will start pairing up.
    it will rain so hard that a 10 gal. hat will hold 12 gal.
    then after the rain the sun comes out and we will be dry in 30 min.
     
  37. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    If it rains for 2 minutes, you will have the whole freeway to yourself. That will be me passing you up!

    If it rains for two days in L.A., that will be the cover story on the news and in the paper. :confused:



    I guess I didn't read the entire question...Typical teacher that I am!

    My location is urban and 100% African-American. I have worked in areas with Hispanic families, Arab-American families, and some schools that were mixed. For the most part, all of my Head Start jobs have been with African-American families, in very low-income areas.

    When I worked in L.A., I had Armenian families, Hispanic families, White and several Asian families. I worked in several schools with Mandarin and Cantonese families, and Vietmanese families too.

    When I lived in L.A., I enjoyed the real meaning of diversity, and worked with families of all ethnic/socio backgrounds. It is truly a melting pot.

    Coming back to Chicago was a culture shock for me. It is clearly segregated throughout the city and suburbs alike.

    Sigh....

    I took French in 5th grade, and college, but never used it. Maybe I should take a trip to Canada...French immersion sounds interesting..
     
  38. Steph-ernie

    Steph-ernie Groupie

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    Jul 15, 2007

    The news will lead off with "STORM WATCH 2007!!" (after 30 minutes of rain!)
     
  39. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    LOL! Yes, you are so right.

    In my school, they cancelled lunch recess, gym, and music. OMG, it was drizzling! The ground wasn't even soaked!
     
  40. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Jul 15, 2007

    what about uniforms??

    Does your school wear uniforms??


    Is it full garb..head to toe, matching hair barettes for girls, ties for boys, down to their, white socks and black-shoes-only?

    Or is it yuppie style with the polo shirt and khaki pants.

    One school where I worked made the teachers wear uniforms too! You always knew when some stranger was in the building or on the playground.

    Are they strict about uniform code? No dress, sent to office? Or do you have a closet with extras, and they get a note home.

    I teach pre-k, and I have seen in on our level too! Personally, I think it is a little harsh. Can't run, play, explore and get messy in a plaid skirt! But they do! And tear up lots of tights in the process!

    also makes transition hard. "If you are wearing, uh... a tie today, go line up!" (we are all wearing the color blue!)
     
  41. OtterMom

    OtterMom Comrade

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    Jul 15, 2007

    Big district, inner city, fast-growing (Fort Worth is in the top 5 fastest-growing cities in the nation), which makes our population SUPER mobile. Last year, only 11 of my 22 students were there from the first day through the last day. I signed enrollment or withdrawal papers 16 times. One girl was only there two weeks!

    My school has about 580 PreK through 5th graders, 89% Hispanic, 6% African American. 97% free lunch (I think) and 80%* economically disadvantaged.

    *This would be higher, but our brilliant Texas Legislature has ruled that schools must include in their figures all the students who are eligible to attend a neighborhood school, even if they don't do so. We have an area of "historical marker" and gentrified-redo homes in our attendance zone, but of course, those children go to private, parochial and magnet schools. I think we're closer to 87% economically disadvantaged.

    The challenges of teaching at my school are by far outweighed by the blessings of impacting the lives of these precious kids. And our staff has a real sense of community and closeness (despite transitory frustrations and snits.) I can't imagine myself at any other school. GO, BULLDOGS! :D
     

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