Texas?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Ms.History, Oct 11, 2011.

  1. Ms.History

    Ms.History Rookie

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    Oct 11, 2011

    For lack of anywhere else to turn, I am turning here for some advice ... : )

    I am considering giving up the comfort of my well-known and loved job to move to Texas, specifically the San Antonio area. I have heard that finding a job in that area is extremely difficult, and the competition is fierce. Is that the case? Are there surrounding areas with smaller schools that I could apply to? Does Texas have a website that lists all open teaching jobs, or would I need to check each district's site?

    As far as certification, the process is fairly typical and expensive. ($180 to review credentials, $50 for fingerprints, $77 for certification, $150 for required exams, plus the cost of the Texas History class I'm assuming I will need to take). Do you think I would benefit by obtaining TX certification before I begin applying? Or do most districts hire teachers regardless of which state their current certification comes from?

    Any advice or personal experience is greatly appreciated!
     
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  3. Unbeknownst

    Unbeknownst Cohort

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    Oct 11, 2011

    Well, I live in Texas. And I also happen to live in San Antonio ... so maybe I can help :)

    1. Yes. The competition for jobs here is as fierce as you've heard. My co-worker has an EXTREMELY well-credentialed daughter that is a teacher, and she had to teach 3 years at a Charter school before she could get accepted into a public school (this is her first year as a public school teacher.)

    2. There are surrounding schools that you could apply to, but for every mile you go outside San Antonio, you significantly increase your commute time.

    3. There is a website that shows a LOT of current Texas teaching jobs: http://www.tasanet.org/index.php?option=com_careercenter&Itemid=1018&task=offer_search. However, it doesn't show them all.

    You can search by region. San Antonio is Region 20.

    4. As for certification, you'll need to have it completed or at least underway (to be completed before hiring date) before you'll be considered for a job. There's just too much competition here for them to jump through hoops for someone.

    5. Personal Experience? San Antonio is FANTASTIC!! I'm a small-town guy, and I absolutely love it here. It's true what they say: it's a Big Town (Small-town feel in a Big City).

    :)

    Hope that helped!
     
  4. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Oct 11, 2011

    The website for the region is www.esc20.net. Good luck! I can't add anything else to Unbeknowst's post, but I do agree with what he wrote!
     
  5. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Oct 11, 2011

    I can't add much either, but I will say that some schools and principals actually prefer out of state candidates!

    Get your ELL certification as soon as you can, too. In many districts it's required within the first 3 years of getting a job. (This is especially true for elementary teachers!)
     
  6. Ms.History

    Ms.History Rookie

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    Oct 12, 2011

    Thank you so much for the information -- I really appreciate it! After visiting Texas (and especially San Anotonio) a couple times this summer, I completely understand why people are so eager to be there! : )

    A couple follow up questions...

    1. Why is teaching at a charter school less desireable than teaching at a public school? And is there a place to find job listings for these schools?

    2. Looking at private school job postings in San Antonio, it seems like they are more concerned with coaching skills than teaching credentials ... is that typical?

    3. To become ELL certified, do you take test #154 of the TExES? Is this something that has to be done in Texas, or can it be completed from a remote location? Would you recommend taking classes or just studying the manual?

    Thanks for the suggestion -- apparently I'm going to need anything and everything that will give me a leg up in finding a job there, especially since it also sounds like "who you know" is half the battle in scoring an interview.

    Thanks again for all the helpful advice!
     
  7. Unbeknownst

    Unbeknownst Cohort

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    Oct 12, 2011

    1. More money. Aforementioned co-worker's daughter got a $10,000 a year raise when transitioning to public school.

    If money's not an issue for you, then consider one "con" off the list!

    2. It's Texas :) But seriously, I'm not sure about that trend to be honest with you.

    3. I have no idea about the technicalities of it, so you'll have to wait for someone else. But for taking classes or studying the manual, my teacher-friend in East Texas just "winged it" and scored very, very high.

    However, she's also super smart.

    I'm a firm believe that you are your own best teacher, so I'd recommend studying the manual.
     
  8. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Oct 12, 2011

    1. Charter schools make much less money and work many more hours. They are "contract" pay, so you have no job security.

    2. Some private schools are very academically rigorous, and some are just "diploma mills." You just have to research the school. Again, they are paid considerably less, and they don't get to put money into the Texas Teacher Retirement system.

    3. If you have teaching experience, the manual will be enough. It's pretty common sense. I don't think there is a way to take it remotely.

    On a final note: Texas teachers do NOT pay in to social security. We only have TRS. We also are not eligible for "survivor" benefits, so if your SO gets social security, you will not get any of it if she/he passes before you do. I'm not sure you will be able to get any social security you've earned in another state up to this point. I know WE don't get any. In other words, even if we work part time somewhere that pays in to social security, we are not allowed to get that money. (Texas teachers have fought this unsuccessfully for many, many years....)
     

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