Texas contract Question

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by RobertTexasMath, Mar 23, 2013.

  1. RobertTexasMath

    RobertTexasMath Rookie

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    Mar 23, 2013

    In Texas if you sign a contract renewal, you can take another job if you're not with 45 days of the upcoming school year.
    Does anyone know if you can do this if you sign with a school for the first year?
    If I was to be given an offer by a school, that I consider and upgrade from my current school but not my first choice, and I signed and then was given an offer by my first choice can I get out of the contract?
     
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  3. ayla

    ayla Companion

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    Mar 24, 2013

    I think if you sign a contract, you are committing...
     
  4. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    Mar 24, 2013

    Oh Robert, sounds pretty slimy to me.
     
  5. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Mar 24, 2013

    I think they all say you have until 45 days before the first instructional day to resign legally. I'm not sure I would sign if I wasn't committed to a school, but I also don't think there is anything wrong with taking a different job before the school year starts. Leaving at the last minute or during a school year is a lot different than in the middle of summer.
     
  6. RobertTexasMath

    RobertTexasMath Rookie

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    Mar 24, 2013

    ayla

    It's a different game in Texas. If you don't sign a contract when it is offered, usually March or April, you have zero chance of being hired elsewhere.
    Schools who do not want to renew a teacher, will usually offer the teacher the option of resigning. If a school offers a contract and you don't want to sign it, you must resign.
    Hiring schools assume that if you resigned it was basically to avoid being fired.
    During the hiring season schools understand that teachers under contract may leave take another job if it is not within the 45 day window. It's a system they created.
    This is a the expectation and it is the way it is done almost 100% of the time.
    The one thing I'm not sure about is if this just applies to contract renewals and not with initial contracts with a school district.
     
  7. ayla

    ayla Companion

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    Mar 25, 2013

    I understand switching after signing with the 45 day rule, I meant it more in the way Mathemagician said it: it is super slimy to sign and then not stay if it is not a renewal. I wouldn't be surprised if it didn't apply to new contracts. I don't know why you would have zero chance of getting a NEW contract if you don't sign now compared to teachers being let go, it seems completely different to me. But maybe I'm not understanding your explanation of why you need a contract now just to break it in a few months and how that works in Texas in being the only way to get hired.
     
  8. txmomteacher2

    txmomteacher2 Enthusiast

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    Mar 25, 2013

    There have been teachers that I have worked with that didn't actually resign until one week before school started. They were released from their contract no problem. Our principal and district understood their reasons for leaving. Now when it comes to resigning in the middle of the year is a different story. We had a teacher who wanted to leave and they weren't going to let her unless we found a replacement. We did she left and everyone was happy.
     

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