Test Review

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Peregrin5, Nov 30, 2012.

  1. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,004

    Nov 30, 2012

    I just introduced a test review procedure into my class that I felt I had needed for a while now. On the past two tests, the students would just take the test, and I would record the score. They were multiple choice on scantron so I didn't really know how to provide good feedback.

    So my procedure is that after the test, and after the tests have been scanned, students are required to fill out a sheet that requires them to copy down the questions they got incorrect, correct the problem and write a rationale for why the correction is the correct answer or why they got the question wrong in the first place.

    All students are required to do this, so they get practice on the problems that they missed and they are able to review the test and work their way a few more inches to mastery.

    I also allow students to retake tests up to a week after the test, but prior to today, I didn't ever have anyone actually show up to retake the test, and when they did they would usually get the same problems wrong or get the same score.

    I hoped that this new procedure would provide them some more skill in answering the questions and more confidence to retake the test. A lot more students committed to retaking the test and a lot showed up just today. Every one that showed up showed significant gains in their test scores except one girl who retook the test without correcting her answers first (it was my fault that I missed that, I intend to require that all students who retake the test hand in that corrections sheet to me first).

    More intend to come in next week. I'm quite happy and feel that I taught an effective unit.

    What do you do for test review or test feedback?
     
  2.  
  3. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Messages:
    2,974
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 1, 2012

    Why are you giving all multiple choice exams?
     
  4. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,004

    Dec 1, 2012

    Several reasons. One they are easy to grade.

    Two, they prepare students for standardized tests.

    Three, feedback and grade return is immediate rather than waiting a week for me to grade through them and hand them back. I had them all graded and was able to return them the next day.

    Four, because the software used to create these tests has a database of questions that are all high level and all based on state standards.

    Five, it allows for easy data analysis so I can understand quickly and easily which questions students have had problems with and which standards they didn't understand.

    I require students to write often in my class as it is, and they do a lot of formal assessments (i.e. projects and portfolios) that I feel are very helpful because they are task based. I don't think essay questions on our exams are necessary because of the amount of formal assessment I already give them.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Dec 1, 2012

    Actually, under CCSS, there will be less multiple choice types of questions on standardized tests. The goal is to develop etter critical thinking skills. According to the PARCC website, "The new standards will also emphasize critical thinking. Students will be required to read and analyze information, and be able to form and defend opinions based on their knowledge, Dunlop said, rather than answering a series of "cut-and-dry, multiple choice questions." "It requires a lot of writing across the curriculum," she said. As a former teacher, Dunlop said these new standards will come as a relief for teachers, who will no longer have to guess the "random fact" that will show up on a test, but rather focus on what they should be teaching."
     
  6. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,004

    Dec 1, 2012

    The test questions OARS provides requires a LOT of critical thinking actually. It's great software. They involve a lot of passages and reading and then using that information to critically come to a judgment or solution. Very little of it is memorization of facts.

    But as long as they're able to grade these new standardized essay questions effectively and quickly, I'd welcome them.

    (Our district is actually hiring teachers over the summer to grade these new standardized essay questions though I think there is now software out there that can do this kind of thing.)
     
  7. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2011
    Messages:
    1,372
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 1, 2012

    The only problem I have with that is that the students aren't accountable for the material the first time around. If they do poorly, they can just take it again. Do you let them get all the points back this way, or just a portion?
     
  8. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    Messages:
    5,770
    Likes Received:
    1,004

    Dec 1, 2012

    I let them get back all of their points. However those who get a hundred percent the first time around do not have to do any of the test review (copying the question, finding the correct answer and rationalizing their answer) and can work on their individual projects (something enjoyable) while those who did poorly may have to do many pages of test review for each of the questions they got incorrect.

    So it is not entirely without consequences, and I think my stance is that my primary goal is to get them mastery and not penalize them point-wise for what they got wrong.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. sairam,
  2. stargirl
Total: 313 (members: 5, guests: 276, robots: 32)
test