Test/Evaluation frustration

Discussion in 'General Education' started by gr3teacher, Apr 25, 2015.

  1. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Apr 25, 2015

    So I was told the specific district test I had to use for my evaluation, and the specific goal. We took the test yesterday. It came up one student short of making the goal (85% pass, 50% at 85% or above). My kids came in 15 points above the district average, and five points above the school average. I have the highest pass rate in my (very large) district, the highest class average, and the second-highest 85%+ rate. But, my evaluation will show that I did not meet my goal, and can't get the highest overall rating when I'm back on summative evaluation for NEXT year.

    So that one student short? There was a question with a scale, with the line at 4.5. The question asked how many pounds the object was. The answers accepted... 4.5, 4 1/2, 4.50, 4 5/10. My student wrote... 4 pounds 8 ounces. That question knocked him from a 86% to an 83%, and knocked my 85%+ rate from 52% to 48%. Of course the district in its infinite wisdom did not create any sort of mechanism for overriding the incorrect answer.

    Three other kids made similar mistakes (writing 4.5 pounds instead of just 4.5)... one of them would have passed otherwise (69%=>71%).. but that doesn't affect me since I was above the pass rate anyway.

    But... come on, really?

    That's not even getting into that fact that there was a question district-wide which 90% of students missed, because it was frankly illogical (it showed a kid's small wading pool, and asked the best estimate for filling it up... the answer choices were 1 gallon, 10 gallons, 100 gallons, 1000 gallons. Virtually every kid picked 10 gallons.)
     
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  3. The Natural Log

    The Natural Log Rookie

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    Apr 25, 2015

    Looks like they really got you good :lol:
     
  4. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Yet another reason linking test scores to evaluations isn't ideal. We all think students are more than their test scores, but so are teachers!
     
  5. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Well... the worst part is that there's a student who hasn't finished taking the test yet. She's by far my top math student, but gets extreme test anxiety. Since "officially," this test is only formative, I don't need to have her finish it. Students are told repeatedly that it is not taken for a grade, and is only to see what we need to review as a class. I have absolutely no math concerns about her at all. My admin and math coach advised me to just have her skip the rest. But... since she's gotten all the questions answered so far correct, and since she's gotten a 100% on every math test or assessment she's taken this year... she'd be a pretty safe bet to get at least an 85%. Academically, she shouldn't take it. It's causing her too much stress. Professionally though... I need her to finish it, even though she'll probably lose at least one full day of classroom instruction, if not two.
     
  6. The Natural Log

    The Natural Log Rookie

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    Apr 25, 2015

    Some might argue "selfishly" if it's only to get a "high" rating for yourself.
     
  7. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Yes, me having her finish the test ultimately would be selfish, which is why I'm leaning towards not having her do it, but it puts me in a pretty terrible position. The onlu way to show I'm helping students (from an evaluative standpoint) is to intentionally NOT help a student that needs it.
     
  8. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Apr 25, 2015

    Honestly, I've often wondered if I could teach in such an environment.
     
  9. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    I am confused. Do think she should have to be exposed to taking tests in this case or do you think she needs (maybe already has) professional services for it and it is best for her to not take the test emotionally?

    Your not in a terrible position, your in a position of making a choice based on character and integrity.
     
  10. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    So grade3's ENTIRE evaluation is based on these test scores or is their more to the evaluation than this?
     
  11. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Technically, 40% is based on test scores, but getting the top overall rating is impossible without getting the top overall student data rating.
     
  12. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    I understand, I am just glad that there is more to the evaluation than just the test scores.
     
  13. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I wish I could share your happiness that it will be impossible for me to get the top evaluation rating NEXT year because of what I'd consider to be an unfair situation THIS year... though yes, I'm also glad that I'm evaluated largely on factors that are within my control.
     
  14. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    I never insinuated, suggested, or implied that I was happy that you could not get a top evaluation. I was simply responding to a post that made a false claim.
     
  15. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Apr 25, 2015

    I have to admit that one of the biggest plus factors for switching to Value Added is that I no longer have to give those pre-tests and post-tests. At least one of my students intentionally tanked the post-test because she was mad at me that day. It didn't affect her grade so she didn't care.

    Right now, they account for 42.5% of my teacher ranking. 42.5% is my actual evaluation done by my Instructional Supervisor. The final 15% is a survey administered to a pre-selected group of students (I have a say in which) about my effectiveness in my classroom. I have a 3 out of 4 on my evaluation and a 3 out of 5 on my student tests. Nobody knows when the surveys will be compiled.
     
  16. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I misunderstood you there... I apologize for that.

    I'm also a little on edge because some of my colleagues are in trouble over this test... I'm not on summative evaluation this year, but both of my teammates are... plus one of the two fourth grade teachers that use the same test. And.. it was a massacre, all over the district. The test went better for me than any other teacher in the district... and it didn't go well for me. If principals don't allow for goal adjustment, and if the math office doesn't rescore or adjust the pass/pass-advanced rates... things could be bad. One of my fourth grade colleagues didn't end up with anybody in the pass-advanced column, and the SPED teacher using this test for her evaluation had a 0% pass rate on it.
     
  17. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Apr 27, 2015

    Well... today was certainly less frustrating. First, my principal assured me that when I submit my data, I can include a written explanation of why my one student should be considered above the 85% mark. Then my pokey student came in today and insisted that she take the test (even before I told her she wasn't going to finish it). I let her finish it... she did... and as far as I can tell, she may be the only student in the district to get a perfect score on it.

    On one hand... I'm happy for myself (and the look of pride on that girl's face was the happiest I've ever seen her). On the other hand, this probably hurts the case for my colleagues arguing that the test isn't fair or appropriate. C'est la vie, I guess.
     
  18. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Apr 27, 2015

    If only one student in the district made a 100, I'd still assume the test was difficult.
     
  19. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Apr 27, 2015

    Is this a bad thing?
     
  20. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Apr 27, 2015

    Probably depends on how they use and interpret the percentage. Having written math competition tests for many years now, I completely understand your point of view: if 10% of students get 100%, then you're missing an opportunity to truly see how high each of those students can reach (and have to award lots of first place awards...ha :)). Then again, if 100% is set as a less attainable goal (because you only want your very tip top student or students to reach that), then that leads to needing to consider what percentage should be considered "passing", as you don't expect students then to reach 100%...which I'm sure isn't the case in many tests that are given, especially by teachers. (Hopefully that made sense...)
     
  21. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Makes perfect sense to me.
     
  22. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Apr 27, 2015

    If the assessment is criterion-referenced, then more than one student district wide should make a 100. Criterion-referenced tests are based on the standards you taught, so theoretically, students should be able to do well on them.

    For a frame of reference, when my district gives criterion-referenced assessments (made by an outside company but aligned to our pacing), at the end of each module, each school has 3-5 students make a 100. Multiply that by the seven schools taking the test, and you have roughly 20-35 students making the top score. That averages to 3-5% of the testing population.
     

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