Terror Child

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by Peachyness, Oct 24, 2006.

  1. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Oct 24, 2006

    I have this child who is evil, has no empahthy, and who is very smart. Today, she was having an off day. During recess she decided to scream at the top of her lungs in other children's ears. I heard her from my classroom, but couldn't go out to deal with her because I had kids working in my classroom, finishing up their work. My kids who were outside ran back to class panicked, that this child was scraming into kid's ears. When the bell rang, I saw this child crying. The other kinderteacher who was on yard duty told me that this child was screaming in children's ears and had to put her on the wall. This child was crying and screaming that she wanted to have recess. I said very sternly, "you screamed in kids ears. Of course you're going to miss recess. How would you like it if I yelled in your ear?" We walked in class and she was still crying and screaming and refused to calm down. I called a six grade teacher to send some six grade kids over to take her out. I said in front of this child, "I need ____ to be taken out of my class". (she agreed to take the child when she gets like this) Then I said to this child, you are not a team learner, you are distrupting our learning time so I can't have you in my class." I told her parents that she will be recieving a refferral- several refferrals equals visit to prinicapl and possible suspenion. This isn't the first time she's acted like this. She's puposefully screamed right in my ear and then laughed, she'll cry while smiling and laughing, because she loves being center of attention. She'll misbehave, and she knows it, and then cry and scream when I give her the consequences. She's an only child and is very spoiled. She wants to be in control and always wants the spot light on her. I decided to give her a refferral every time she screams in my class and behaves like she did today because it's now seriously distrupting our learning time. I told my kids to ignore her when she acts bad, and they will even say, "Mrs. ____, I'm ignoring her."

    How would you deal with this child? This is my second year teaching and so I've never had a child who behaved like this. I have nightmares of this child and dread going to work.
     
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  3. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Oct 26, 2006

    How would I deal with her? Or how would I LIKE to deal with her? LOL! I would keep writing her up. Don't tolerate it one bit! Her parents obviously need a bit of a wake up call!!! I would LOVE to scream back in her ear, but we can't. You can dream about it though! ;)
     
  4. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Oct 26, 2006

    Thank you for responding. I guess I will continue writing her up. It's funny. After getting into trouble for screaming into kids' ears, the next day she went out and screamed in their ear's again during recess!
     
  5. ppax

    ppax Rookie

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    Oct 26, 2006

    Wow. Lots of issues going on here. First, I would try to stay a step ahead of the misbehavior. Look for triggers and then develop ways to deal with them. Is she a struggling student and responding to her inability to do grade level work? Accomadate so she can still meet your objectives, but at a level she can handle. Sit her rear down and develop consequences together. See if she will do something like a "break license" so that if she feels herself getting out of control, she grabs the pass, which allows her say 5 minutes to go cool down and then return. Find things that she is good at and start there. Tell her what she can do, not what she can't. (I.e. "stop running in the halls" to "Walk in the halls".) Use her first name frequently and develop a relationship. Get mom and dad in together for a conference (many times only one parent shows... having the second one there can make a difference.) Call in help from a counselor or anyone or program availabe. Rule out as much as you can (adhd, aspergers... have her tested if you can). On your personal end. look for the small steps of improvement... she didn't get like that in a day and she will probably eradiate all of the behavior in a day. Look for the positive (she cursed 12 times today, down from 16 yesterday). She is seeking powerr from the sounds of it... give her choices whenever possible. If she gets into it with another student, have her identify what she wanted, the behavior she did to get it, establish it didn't work, and brainstorm and model better choices. Be consistent. Good luck with this one... !
     
  6. Deeena

    Deeena Cohort

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    Oct 27, 2006

    I know for some of my difficult students, it helps if I stop and talk to them before I know the behavior will occur. For example, I have one little girl who never lines up on time after recess. I end up having to chase her off the playground. I found that it helps if I stop her before it's time to line up and say, "In about 1 min. we are going to line up. Let's see if you can be the first one to get in line." This has really made a difference. With your student, remind her before recess about yelling in people's ears and the consequences that come with it. Be encouraging when you remind her ("I know you can do it."). Be very positive with her if she remembers not to yell that day. She seems to be seeking attention, so if she has a good day, perhaps you can keep her after school for 10 min. and read a book with her. Explain that you want to spend special time with her b/c she had a great day. I also agree with the other comments such as having another conference with her parents. She definitely needs to know that her behavior is serious. Good luck! I have some difficult kids in my class too.
     
  7. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    Oct 27, 2006

    Please don't ever call a child evil. I assume you were just venting but...

    I think a very important thing to do is document everything. Write down her behaviors, what triggered the behavior (if you can figure it out), how you responded, and how she responded to you.

    When I have a very difficult student, I seek advice from other professionals in my building (psychologist, counselor, etc.). It is nice to have their input on a child and different perspectives really help, especially when I'm at my wit's end.
     
  8. parapromia

    parapromia New Member

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    Oct 27, 2006

    take the "wind" out of the screaming child's "sails"

    If you are near the child when she begins screaming at another child, rather than acknowledging her screaming, turn the attention away from her. Say look at this child's face (as you gently put your arm around the child's shoulder) he/she does not like being screamed at. Then the child can say, "Stop it, I don't like it, you are hurtin my ears!" The screamer, being an only child has no one to teach her the proper way to get good attention. Also, when she does something right accentuate the positive and ignore the negative as long as it's safe.
     
  9. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Oct 28, 2006

    Well, thank you for your input and advices. I've met with the parents plenty of times! They are very supportive and if she misbehaves at shchool, then her parents will follow up with more consequences at home (no tv, etc). She has gotten a lot better, but is still a huge handful. Also, sevenplus, I never call her evil in front of her or in front of my other kids. I was just venting! I just can't believe her behavior half of the times. She is extremly bright but the curriculum is pretty challanging, or I will make it challanging (I have a lot of bright kids this year). So, I don't think that she's misbehaving because she's bored. She is an only child and grandchild, she gets lots of attention at home. And according to parents, she behaves like an angel at home. But, anyways, she's going to have to learn that when she's in school, there are 19 other kids to share the attention with.
    It's also pretty random when she decides to scream her lungs off. I've kept records. But, her mom helps me on Fridays, so at least her mom will get a good idea of how she behaves in school. She will know that I'm not excaggerating or anything.
     
  10. Rosieo

    Rosieo Enthusiast

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    Oct 28, 2006

    Several years ago I had a child just like this. His parents even admitted he had "spoiled brat syndrome!" He was very hard to deal with and only got worst as he got older. Just stay firm!
     
  11. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Oct 28, 2006

    Oh dear! Her mom mentioned that she hopes her child gets over this period soon because she can't imagine dealing with this until she's in college.
     
  12. diro.pams

    diro.pams Companion

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    Oct 29, 2006

    I find it amazing that she doesn't display this behavior anywhere else. Really?
    Be strong! You will succeed! Don't back down. Be consistent. Be cool headed.
     

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