Terrified New Teacher (2nd): literacy resources help

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Catherine H, Jul 6, 2016.

  1. Catherine H

    Catherine H Guest

    Jul 6, 2016

    Hello friends, just got my first teaching job- Second Grade Language Arts/ Social Studies, and I am scared out of my mind. I know very little about teaching reading/writing. Trying to learn as much as I can before the school year starts. Looking for recommendations on where to start/ what to do/ and general advice on teaching second. Many thanks!!
     
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  3. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

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    Jul 6, 2016

    Congrats on the job!
    Look at www.teachingchannel.org for ideas on classroom management and lessons. You can watch videos of teachers in action.

    Go to Barnes and Nobel and read: Teach Like a Champion by Doug Lemov and Teach Like a Pirate By Dave Burgess

    Kelly Gallaghar has some great strategies

    NewsELA and MobyMax is good too! Good Luck
     
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  4. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jul 6, 2016

    Can you get your materials yet? If so, go through the teacher's manual for ideas. They can be so much help for new teachers. Also, decide if you are going to do a read-aloud daily and see if you can get books that go along with your curriculum outline/themes. I love reading in early elementary.
     
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  5. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    Jul 6, 2016

    So are you teaching two different 2nd grade classes Language Arts and Social Studies each day?
     
  6. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Jul 8, 2016

    Read up on guided reading; you will definitely need to differentiate in language arts.
    I like Kelly Gallagher for upper grades, but maybe not for second.
    Check out the Daily Five.
    Debbie Diller (or Miller, I get them confused!) has some good books on literacy stations.
    I like Sharon Taberski's On Solid Ground.
    Nonfiction Mentor Texts by Dorfman and Capelli will help integrate SS and ELA.
     
  7. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Jul 8, 2016

    I agree with the above advice. Early in my career, observing other teachers teaching was quite beneficial, and today's technology makes that even more possible. Basal texts provide much information on making sure you don't miss important concepts and procedures. If it's still just as good as it was a few years ago, I'd recommend trying to get ahold of a TE for Modern Curriculum Press's Phonics for the extra ideas they had in the margins, perhaps available at a college library; the ideas were classified for students needing extra help or for advanced students, but in reality, all the activities were worthwhile for any student. That reminds me of a word of caution--when I first began teaching, I'd try to cram in too many extension activities into my lessons and would fall behind. I'm currently reading The Book Whisperer. The author is a 6th grade language arts/social studies teacher. Many of her procedures of course are more for upper grades, but the main idea applies to all grades--students advance in reading by reading and by being read to; in modern classrooms, the amount of time students actually spend reading is often limited--perhaps as little as 5 minutes daily. At a 2nd grade level, you might want to allow for cooperative groups of 2 or 3 during independent reading time which will assist the students with fluency, and certainly encourage individualized reading at school and/or at home. Be on the lookout for book giveaways in your area and also yard sales; I developed my classroom library from these and also from visiting thrift stores. For used books, I'd suggest checking for moldy smells and sifting through the pages and looking under the cover for insects.
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 8, 2016

    I'm hoping your school assigns you a mentor. You need to find out the district's literacy philosophies. Do they use packaged programs (basals)? Workshop model? Centers?
     
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  9. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Jul 8, 2016

    I agree. It's difficult to get started without knowing the district's approaches. A mentor teacher should help you. I think no matter what, you will need guided reading and read alouds. Check out the Daily 5 structure. Check out Moby Max, spelling city, Raz kids, Scholastic News, and Teacher pay teachers.
     

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