Telling Students Santa isn't Real

Discussion in 'General Education' started by jojo808, Dec 8, 2012.

  1. jojo808

    jojo808 Comrade

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    Dec 8, 2012

    I teach 6th grade--(10-11 yr olds). I was with a student at recess when another student came in and stated something like: "In science we talked about how santa isn't real."

    I said something like "of course Santa is real!"

    The Science teacher on our team is telling students that Santa isn't real, that he is made up for commercial reasons. Other students are talking about is as well.

    This bothers me!! What do you think?
     
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  3. Chrissteeena

    Chrissteeena Companion

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    Dec 8, 2012

    I, personally, think that is wrong. I think the parents (or guardian, someone in the family) should be telling their child that there is no Santa. I don't know when I stopped believing in Santa, but I do know that it wasn't a teacher who said that he is made up for commercial reasons. I walked in on my Dad putting all the gifts marked "from Santa" under the tree one night because my Aunt had been staying over and I wanted to say hi to her.
     
  4. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    Dec 8, 2012

    They're sixth graders - the cat should be already out of the bag on that one, so to speak. Most kids, by that age, have figured it out, outgrown the fantasy, or heard the truth from their peers.

    I think it's an odd subject for a science class, but I doubt the teacher disillusioned anyone.
     
  5. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Dec 8, 2012

    A teacher in Florida was fired for that several years ago. We just had one hit the media in Austin (these were Kinders).

    I don't think it's ever right to tell a child their beliefs are wrong.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    ]

    This isn't a teacher's role. Period.

    My THIRD GRADE teacher told my class...and Christmas wasn't a holiday she celebrated. It caused an uproar.
     
  7. physteach

    physteach Companion

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    Dec 8, 2012

    When I taught 6th graders, I definitely had kids who truly believed in Santa. No need to ruin that :)

    It came up in my science room that year because kids figured science is about a search for the knowledge, so I probably had cracked the Santa code.
     
  8. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    This is wrong. I know of a parent who has a 6th grader who still believes in Santa. True, very few 6th graders believe in Santa, but why ruin it for the one or two that might.

    The history of Santa Claus is an interesting and complex subject. For a teacher to say he is only for commercial reasons needs to study her history or keep quiet about the subject because she is misleading the students by sharing only some of the information. I would suggest she does the latter.
     
  9. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I have a hard time believing that any 6th grader could still believe in Santa. But, I wouldn't ever have a discussion about the topic at school. When I taught third, and it came up, I just said something sort of mysterious about it.
     
  10. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    I agree!
     
  11. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Of course we should strip whatever remaining innocence they have left in 6th grade so they are prepared to start drinking and getting pregnant when middle school comes.
     
  12. PinkCupcake

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    Children will have enough craziness to deal with when they get older. Let them enjoy innocence and keep believing in Santa. This is just my opinon of course.
     
  13. jojo808

    jojo808 Comrade

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    Thanks--I needed validation! I'm sure many students knew about Santa, or were suspicious, but why ruin it?
     
  14. Tasha

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    I think it is awful :(
     
  15. 2ndTimeAround

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    that's horrible. I'd be furious if my child was in that class.
     
  16. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    I teach 6th and 7th grade Social Studies and I was also talking about the commercial aspect of Christmas (and mentioned how Santa is not real) with my students this week. I just assumed no one that age still believed in Santa.

    The fact alone that people think I should pretend that Santa is real when talking to my students, is one of the main reasons teaching middle school drives me crazy. I cannot believe that I am expected to LIE to preteens about Santa being fake.
     
  17. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I don't even see how it should come up.

    I don't tell my students how to vote so I'd never ruin any belief like Santa for them if I taught a younger grade.
     
  18. msufan

    msufan Comrade

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    I can see how a secondary science teacher might think that it's tough to reconcile:

    (1) teaching students to be critical thinkers and apply the scientific method to phenomena in the world around them, and

    (2) telling them Santa is real

    I get what many of you are saying: just keep Santa out of the conversation. But from a scientific perspective, isn't it a perfect myth for kids to debunk scientifically?
     
  19. msufan

    msufan Comrade

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    You may want to rethink this one. What if a kid believes he's worthless? What if a kid believes he's too stupid to learn? What if a kid believes a purple alligator lives inside his desk?
     
  20. msufan

    msufan Comrade

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    Don't you think you lose credibility when you outright lie to the kids and most of them know it? Why not go with something more ambiguous, like this (said with a knowing smile), "You know, I personally still put out a stocking... just in case."
     
  21. KinderCowgirl

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    I have a student right now who brings her imaginary friend Lisa to school with her and talks to her at recess-and I would never think to tell her Lisa wasn't real and she should stop pretending she is. The same would go for the purple alligator.
     
  22. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    That's why I won't say santa is real at school...the kids who know see their teacher outright lying to kids. I just refuse to discuss the subject since I have kids who believe and kids who don't.

    I could see how someone would assume no one would still believe by 6th grade. Isn't 6th grade more like 11-12 year-olds? I had a friend in high school who was absolutely off the charts brilliant and she admitted that she believed until 8th grade when her parents finally just told her! The rest of of us couldn't believe it, but she wasn't the type to joke around. Had I not heard that from her I would just assume that by 6th grade kids had figured it out.
     
  23. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    You may not believe in Santa, but you're making me believe Scrooge lives.
     
  24. msufan

    msufan Comrade

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    I agree that I'd tread a bit carefully here, as the girl may have crafted "Lisa" as a coping strategy for some reason. I certainly wouldn't affirm that Lisa was real, though.

    :rofl: :dunno:
     
  25. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I don't care how old the students are, it is not the job of the teacher to tell them whether or not Santa is real or not. IMO
     
  26. FourSquare

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    I have one in 6th! We were sharing journals the other day and he very seriously shared about setting cookies out for Santa and how he was so excited that Santa was going to bring him this and that. His classmates were so respectful and nobody laughed. I'm not sure if it's because they're just that nice or if they believe too.

    I have to admit I was really surprised. :unsure: But I sure didn't ruin it. That's not a teacher's place.
     
  27. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    There are many, many, many other myths out there to be debunked. Kids these days have so little time to actually be kids and to experience the magic of childhood. We expect them to grow up too quickly. Let them have Santa. Find some other story to destroy.
     
  28. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Not really. It's not particularly well-suited to scientific debunking, because you can't disprove it. It's much better to work on issues that exist in the real world. Mythbusters, for example, doesn't go out doing shows about Santa, they do shows about things like, "Would a gun fired in a plane really depressurize the cabin to the point where things get sucked out the window?" -- something where you can actually run a test. You can't run a test disproving the existence of a magical being, because someone claiming otherwise could always say part of the magic is that the test doesn't work.
     
  29. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    I. There are approximately two billion children (persons under 18) in the world. However, since Santa does not visit children of Muslim, Hindu, Jewish or Buddhist religions, this reduces the workload for Christmas night to 15% of the total, or 378 million (according to the Population Reference Bureau). At an average (census) rate of 3.5 children per house hold, that comes to 108 million homes, presuming that there is at least one good child in each.

    II. Santa has about 31 hours of Christmas to work with, thanks to the different time zones and the rotation of the earth, assuming he travels east to west (which seems logical). This works out to 967.7 visits per second.

    This is to say that for each Christian household with a good child, Santa has around 1/1000th of a second to park the sleigh, hop out, jump down the chimney, fill the stockings, distribute the remaining presents under the tree, eat whatever snacks have been left for him, get back up the chimney, jump into the sleigh and get on to the next house. Assuming that each of these 108 million stops is evenly distributed around the earth (which, of course, we know to be false, but will accept for the purposes of our calculations), we are now talking about 0.78 miles per household; a total trip of 75.5 million miles, not counting bathroom stops or breaks. This means Santa's sleigh is moving at 650 miles per second -- 3,000 times the speed of sound. For purposes of comparison, the fastest man-made vehicle, the Ulysses space probe, moves at a poky 27.4 miles per second, and a conventional Reindeer can run (at best) 15 miles per hour.

    III. The payload of the sleigh adds another interesting element. Assuming that each child gets nothing more than a medium sized Lego set (two pounds), the sleigh is carrying over 500 thousand tons, not counting Santa himself. On land, a conventional Reindeer can pull no more than 300 pounds. Even granting that the "flying" Reindeer could pull ten times the normal amount, the job can't be done with eight or even nine of them -- Santa would need 360,000 of them. This increases the payload, not counting the weight of the sleigh, another 54,000 tons, or roughly seven times the weight of the Queen Elizabeth (the ship, not the monarch).

    IV. 600,000 tons traveling at 650 miles per second crates enormous air resistance -- this would heat up the Reindeer in the same fashion as a spacecraft re-entering the earth's atmosphere. The lead pair of Reindeer would absorb 14.3 quintillion joules of energy per second each. In short, they would burst into flames almost instantaneously, exposing the Reindeer behind them and creating deafening sonic booms in their wake. The entire Reindeer team would be vaporized within 4.26 thousandths of a second, or right about the time Santa reached the fifth house on his trip. Not that it matters, however, since Santa, as a result of accelerating from a dead stop to 650 m.p.s. in .001 seconds, would be subjected to forces of 17,500 g's. A 250 pound Santa (which seems ludicrously slim) would be pinned to the back of the sleigh by 4,315,015 pounds of force, instantly crushing his bones and organs and reducing him to a quivering blob of pink goo.
     
  30. msufan

    msufan Comrade

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    This is exactly the old email forward I was thinking of... :D:D
     
  31. ms99

    ms99 Rookie

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    Dec 11, 2012

    I would never tell a kid that Santa wasn't real. It's just not my place. I was asked just today if he was real and I just replied, "He's bringing me presents." Not a lie, my parents still write From Santa on their gifts to us haha. :)
     
  32. MrsLilHen

    MrsLilHen Comrade

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    Santa is pretty important part of the magic of childhood. I don't think it is a teacher's job to tell kids he doesn't exist. In my mind, The Spirit of Santa will always exist - still does for me, and I'm 35. If someone told my own children something negative about Santa, I would be so mad. There have been kids who have told my kids that there is no Santa. I just tell my kids that that kid "must not believe....maybe they don't know."

    I never had the whole "Santa isn't real" conversation with my parents. . . I just grew up, started to realize, and then helped to keep the magic alive for others. I think this world needs to hold to to as much Christmas spirit as possible!

    Are teachers going to start telling kids there's no God?
     
  33. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Thank you Sarge! You definitely answered some questions. :p
     
  34. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Start? This has been going on for decades.
     
  35. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    I've never had that happen, or heard of it happening. I would certainly never say that to a student.
     
  36. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    That would be illegal. But then, so would telling them there IS a deity, and teachers often don't know realize they shouldn't be telling kids that. Or they realize it but do it anyway.

    Santa isn't a religious figure, so he's outside those rules.
     

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