teaching without rewards

Discussion in 'Behavior Management Archives' started by lcr, Nov 28, 2005.

  1. lcr

    lcr Companion

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    Is anyone able to control the class and keep them interested without the reward and punishment systems? I've tried many things, but they are always too much of a hassle.
     
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  3. earthmommy2003

    earthmommy2003 Rookie

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  4. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Well, think about it. Don't we as employees have rewards...benefits, vacation time, raises, etc? Why shouldn't kids? Don't we get in trouble when we are out of line and get repremanded when we do something wrong? That's why schools and jobs have policies right? To keep us in line. If we fail those policies we get punished right? No different for kids. Just my two cents.
     
  5. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    Gee, when I went to school (back in the stone age), the main rewards I remember were the grade on the top of your paper, avoiding the wrath of teachers and parents, and getting promoted at the end of the year. You might get some kind of reward if you had good grades on your report card. And you might get some kind of prize if you won some kind of competition. But we certainly did not get rewards for showing up on time, behaving in class, turning in homework, etc. And strangely enough, all of the kids, even the dumb ones, learned to read, write and do arithmetic.

    I don't think you have to be draconian. But you don't need to bribe them, either.
     
  6. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Bribery and a reward system are two different things, IMHO.
     
  7. kidsalot

    kidsalot Comrade

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    Hi! You didn't mention what grade you teach but my kindergarteners love when I send home a short note saying how great their day was or something special they did. The parents also love geting "positive" notes instead of negative. I find that my difficult students (75% of my class) really have responded to this method.
     
  8. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    kidsalot, that's a good point. A reward systemm can be just as simple as a positive note to a parent. It doesn't have to be materialistic per say (candy, treat, or toy). It can be simple like what you said.
     
  9. Carmen13

    Carmen13 Groupie

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    I can see your point Malcolm, but times have changed since our stone age days!
    I agree with reward notes to parents, but it all depends on the grade. I don't agree with candies as a reward, except if once in a while...
    In my point of view, the best reward we can give to a student is encouraging honest words.
     
  10. webjoy

    webjoy New Member

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    Read the article in the December 2005 Scholastic Instructor written by Alfie Kohn. Then read Marvin Marshall's Book: Discipline Without Punnishment, Rewards, or Stress. Another good book is Quality Schools by William Glasser.
     
  11. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I use candy as prizes in games. The best reward is feeling good about your accomplishments and proud of your own efforts. I don't use other rewards in the classroom. For those who aren't able to always succeed, I reassure them and help them to see what they could do differently next time. Every student will not get A's, but the teacher can help them by recognizing when they work to their own abilities. I just expect excellent behavior - and get it.
     
  12. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    I don't think the original poster ever clarified what grade or age he/she was talking about. I work with preschoolers so my behavior management system is going to be a little different than someone who teaches grade school.
     
  13. Poutierc

    Poutierc New Member

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    I'm a senior in college and a prospective teacher at the secondary level. I would have to say the best way to get the students motivated to work and learn is to give positive feedback as much as possible. I'm also big supporter of building friendships with your students so they will respect you as a teacher and a person and hopefully pay attention more. Also they will hopefully behave more appropriately.
     
  14. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Be fair with kids and they will respond to you. Rewards? I send home positive letters written to the children. They are only 4 and 5 and cannot read, so the parents read them to them. It is a positive experience for all. I do not believe in candy or stickers as rewards. Doing a good job and behaving are rewards in themselves. I am all for the "stone age" because it is realistic, permanent, and it works.
     
  15. lcr

    lcr Companion

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    I teach 4th and 5th grade and the only rewards I give out are "gold medals" for positive behavior. For the most part kids seem to do well if I go over what's expected of them. I do use negative consequences (losing recess, etc.), but I've noticed lately that a lot of my students are becoming disrespectful. They have such bad attitudes! I don't know if it's their role models, the age group, the holidays, the consequences, or a combination that is causing this, but it is becoming increasingly difficult to get them to follow directions.
     
  16. Malcolm

    Malcolm Enthusiast

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    Poutierc,

    You might want to reconsider building friendships with your students. Authority and friendship do not go well together in most cases. And you need the authority to do your job. Ofcourse, this is not to say to not take an interest in your students.

    Carmen,

    I am all for an encouraging word, either to the student or the parent, verbally or in writing. It is the thought of bribing students to do what they are supposed to do anyway with material rewards that I balk at.
     
  17. mshutchinson

    mshutchinson Comrade

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    I have only had that luck with the honors class- where their motivations were intrinsic. They cared about their grades, and their minds- so they listened when I lectured, took notes when they were given, studied when they had tests, asked questions when hey were confused, argued (appropriately) when they thought their ideas were right.. etc..

    With other classes, I've always had to punish and/or reward them, they don't have the motivation inside -unfortunately.

    The rewards are small, (homework pass, extra points on a quiz) and infrequent, but the most important thing was the notice the child was paid. I've even written 'extra consideration' or.. 'I'm impressed' on a child's paper in the middle of class- just so he would know that I thought he was doing something right. We all like to be told that we're doing a good job.
     
  18. Jaicie

    Jaicie Rookie

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    Dr. Marvin Marshall's book Classroom Discipline Without Stress. Punishment, or Rewards is excellent! I also highly recommend Dr. Jim Fay's Teaching With Love and Logic, along with any of his cassette tapes/cd's. These two authors completely changed my behavior management philosophy and teaching style for the better. I wish I'd known about them when I first started teaching 9 years ago. I'm enjoying teaching my 1st and 2nd graders so much more now! :love: I no longer raise my voice. No tickets, no candy, no marble jar, no card-pulling systems, no names on the chalkboard with checkmarks equalling missed minutes of recess. Lots less stress for me, which is great!

    ~Jaicie :)
     
  19. hernandoreading

    hernandoreading Comrade

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    I will have to check those books out! Goodness knows that working with the kids I do causes me a LOT of stress. (I just had a physical fight between two girls in my classroom this past Friday.)
     
  20. mccwen

    mccwen Comrade

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    I'm curious, what do you do when they misbehave? Especially those that are repeat 'offenders'? What about the children who are always on task and never step out of line? Do they get acknowledged at all?
     
  21. Jaicie

    Jaicie Rookie

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    This post is kinda long! Sorry!

    I treat each situation individually. I give delayed consequences rather than immediate ones. I give positive reminders of appropriate behaviors to the entire class pretty frequently. For example, I smile and say, "Children who are following directions and getting their assignment done will get to have recess." I also approach children who aren't following a rule and whisper in their ear, "Remember that children who follow rules get to play at recess." Then I walk away and get right back to teaching. I might jot their names down on a post-it note for later. When recess time comes, I tell the whole class, "It's recess time! Children who followed directions and got their work done can get their coats on." Of course they all go to their coathooks. I quietly approach the "offender" with a sad expression, "Oh, Frankie, this is so sad. I'm surprised to see you getting your coat on. Why do you think I'm surprised?" "I don't know." "Hmmm. Why don't you have a seat at your desk, and when you figure out why I'm surprised, let me know." I go up to each child who'd broken the rules and do the same, always with a sad expression. The otherchildren all go outside. Then the offenders come up to me in a bit. "OK, Mrs. N. I wasn't getting my work done." "Good thinking, Frankie. And what happens to children who don't get their work done. Do they have recess, or not?" "No recess." "That's right. That's really sad that you won't be able to play this recess. Do you think you'll get to play at lunch recess later today?" "Yeah." "What will you have to do to play at lunch recess?" "Do my work in class." "That's right. You have another chance! Hang up your coat and sit at your desk please."

    Of course, it doesn't always work out exactly like that! Every situation is a different, as every child is different. In September, when school started and kids were really testing me and the classroom expectations, I had to do this a LOT! It took a lot of my time. And when I'd ask them, "Why do you think I'm surprised?" many of them said, "I don't know." Sometimes after giving them some think time I'd say, "Remember I said that children who get their work done play at recess?" The key is to be SAD, not angry, and to make it their problem, not yours. No threatening, no arguing. Consequences for misbehavior should be logical. Work isn't done? Do it at recess. Yelling at another student? Write them an apology note and draw a picture of the appropriate behavior. Not following directions? Write me an apology, draw me a picture, and do chores for me during recess, before school, or after school to replace the energy that you took from me. I also call or e-mail parents and have sent kids to the principal's office. It just depends on the situation. Now that it's December, when I say in a sing-song voice, "Time for recess!" some kids actually come up to me and say, "Do I get to go out to recess today?" "Well, I said that children who followed directions and got their work done get to go out. So do you get to go out?" "Yeah, I do!" "Great! Have fun!" OR .. "No, becuase I didn't follow your directions." "Good for you to remember. It's so sad not to have recess. But will you have another chance after lunch? Yes, you will."

    The "Love" component of Fay's management style is using positivity daily with students. Greet them at the door every day with a smile. Get to know them as people. Find out about their families, interests, pets, and ask them about them. Kids love it when you show a genuine interest in them. I also give kids choices whenever I can. It lets them have some control. Always give choices that you, the teacher, approve of. For example, when someone is misbehaving during a whole-class game or activity, I may say, " There are two ways to enjoy this activity. One way is by playing the game by the rules. The other way is by watching the game from your seat. You decide which works best for you."

    I hope this gives you a liitle more info! You can also do a Love and Logic search online for more in-depth information.

    ~Jaicie :)
     
  22. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    I like the Jim Fay books and tapes. It takes awhile(as you said) because usually I find that the teacher before me has not used this tecnique so I have to be patient and consistent , but it does work. I don't use stickers and charts either...they are too time consuming and hard for me to do . Love and Logic does it all for the most part.
     
  23. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jaicie, that was very well explained. Thank you.
     
  24. kabd54

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    There would probably have to be fewer reward systems if kids had to worry about being promoted like we did. Nowadays, the policy is that no child is held back. We push them forward, whether they are ready or not, so we don't damage their self-esteem. I think that I would rather have my child's self-esteem bruised for a short while, than have him/her drop out in high school because s/he was pushed through without having to know the material.

    I'm from the Stone Age, too, 'cause I just don't get that kind of thinking.
     
  25. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    I used rewards. At 9 and 10 kids aren't always able to make the connection with intrinsic rewards as something to work for. So if that sticker or eraser encourages them to try, you better believe I'm going to give it. Once they've made it, that's when the intrinsic part comes in. They get so excited by what they have done. Then the original reward just becomes an afterthought.
     
  26. TeacherGroupie

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    I'd like to suggest another way to look at the rewards: as tangible reminders, especially to kids who have difficulty, that they really can do what they need to do - there's something to look at and think, yes, I did it then, I can do that well again.

    In my classes I give high fives, I cheer, and I give "seals of approval" (that's clapping my hands out in front of me and barking like a seal"... it's worth pointing out that the mean age of my students is easily 30-plus; they laugh, but they're also clearly pleased to be noticed and commended.
     
  27. kabd54

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    Don't get me wrong - I use rewards as well. I use the sticker chart system. When their work is completed, i.e. their spelling unit, they can put a sticker on the chart. When the line is complete, they get a trip to the "Treasure Chest" - gotta love the Dollar Store!!

    I also use stickers in their notebooks and on their worksheets. Kids love stickers. :D If truth be told, so do I! Recognition for a job well done is always appreciated.

    I guess the fine line is reward as opposed to bribery.
     
  28. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    I'm chuckling a little; I've been known to explain that sometimes bribery is the right tool (most notably when one is trying to motivate oneself... a tactic that the average fourth grader is plenty old enough to be able to use).
     
  29. kabd54

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    Well, I have been known to use self-bribery - especially when faced with such things as report card or IEP deadlines!;)
     
  30. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    Chocolate is always used for self-bribery in my case!!! LOL!!!!!
     
  31. kabd54

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    You can NEVER go wrong with chocolate! lol.
     
  32. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Exactly!
     
  33. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Especially from Belgium. I just had some.
     
  34. kabd54

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    Was it a bribe or a reward?;)
     
  35. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    I'm betting the correct answer is "yes".
     
  36. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Ha!

    :p :p :p I don't give rewards. I just give bribes.
     
  37. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    See what I mean?
     
  38. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    How funny...now that is truly a deep subject! I am not going to think too much about it or I will surely go crazy.
     
  39. kabd54

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    Bribe...reward...reward...bribe... in the end it's all about the chocolate!!
     
  40. Carmen13

    Carmen13 Groupie

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    I didn't mind if my teachers had bribed me with chocolate...in fact: WHY DIDN'T THEY BRIBED ME??????...with dark chocolate...with hazel and nuts, yummy...
    Hum, so now I'm considering bribing my students...do you think the bribe works with adults as well?
     
  41. kabd54

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    Bribes work especially well with adults! With or without nuts!:D (Hmmm - beginning to sound like one of the other threads...)
     

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