Teaching with taking notes

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Historyteaching, Oct 11, 2009.

  1. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Oct 11, 2009

    Hey Ya'll-

    Just wanting to get a little feedback here.

    When lecturing (or however you choose to put it) and you have notes on the board/slideshow/powerpoint that the students need to copy down. How do you conduct the class? Do you talk about it then they write? Do you let them write while you talk? Or do you let them write and then talk? Or other methods.

    I'm trying to think of a better way for my students that they can listen to and participate in the discussion/lecture and also be able to get down pertinent notes.

    Thanks!
     
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  3. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    Oct 11, 2009

    I usually let them copy and then we discuss what they just wrote because otherwise they are writing and miss any important points that I add in.
     
  4. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I never liked when my teachers lectured while we had to take notes, so I do not require my students to do that. Of course, I teach language arts to sixth graders, so my notes are minimal. In high school they are better able to listen and write, but it's still difficult especially depending upon the teacher's speed both in speaking and changing notes. I like when teachers provide notes with important information replaced with a line so that students must fill those in during the lecture, but I understand that may not be suitable for higher grades and might require too much copying resources.
     
  5. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    My kids follow along on their laptops and add on to them as we go. They can then review their notes later on power point, since I've been doing this our mini-discussions during notes have gotten ALOT better.
     
  6. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    I tried the pre-made notes with FIB and they will search for that specific thing and then just stop and not pay attention. And yeah, I would go over my copying limit for the 9 weeks in less than a month.

    I've had a few students say they can't listen and write at the same time. I teach 9th and 10th graders.

    The only thing I worry about, is that they would take too long to copy the information and not have time to listen to a lecture/discussion about the information, or they will write, be done and not pay attention. Hmm.

    I try to simplify the notes as much as possible so they aren't writing EVERYTHING there is to know down word for itty bitty word.

    Thanks..please keep the feedback coming..this has been on my mind for 3 years.
     
  7. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Unfortunately Brendan, we don't have laptops for all the students. But what a great idea if we did.
     
  8. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    Oct 11, 2009

    what about this....
    You lecture/show powerpoint, etc. for one chunk of text. Have the kids turn and talk with a neighbor about THE MOST IMPORTANT information. That is what they write down. You can ask a few of the pairs to share what they discussed.
    This accomplishes a couple of things: they all have to listen; they get to talk through what they've heard, then they get to write. Three modalities covered.
    Turn and talk is something that happens in just about every elementary classroom, but middle and high school teachers don't employ it as much. I've found participation has increased since I've started using it.
     
  9. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Yes, "turn and talk" and "think, pair, share"...those are great ideas even for older students.
     
  10. thEnzo

    thEnzo New Member

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    Oct 13, 2009

    Hello.
    I'm an Education Student majoring in Mathematics. Our good teachers always advice us to take notes whenever a mathematical problem appears new to us. Good note taking involves self understanding. This means it only involves words/phrases/sentences that explains the thing a teacher discusses. A student that is good in note taking jots down only the important details that he or she needs. The student may also use the language that he or she often uses so that understanding and synthesizing will be better.

    I'm guilty of having a dirty notebook. A lot of quotations and annotations are found in my notebook.

    Enz Bumatay
    Manila, Philippines
     
  11. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Oct 13, 2009

    When I was in high school, I remember being offended if I was given "fill in the blank" notes. Students will not be given those in college. Yes, teach them how to listen for the important parts. Yes, teach them how to structure their notes. Teach them how to use bullet points, outlines, abbreviations, etc. that will help them take notes faster. But don't baby them, or they will always expect it! I don't even like putting notes on PowerPoints, because then they copy what it says and then tune out.
     
  12. alym

    alym New Member

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    Hi! I’m a third year college student taking up secondary education major in social studies. I think, as a student I suggest that you let them copy first then talk. In that way, the students will now focus and listen to you after they have copied the lecture.

    ♥ Myla ♥
    Myla Grace R. Mendoza
    Manila, Philippines
    mylagracemendoza@yahoo.com
     
  13. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    It would appear a school in the Philippines is requiring students to post here? Cool stuff... and a unique new perspective.

    Anyhow, I typically do my notes via PowerPoint, but they only contain the bare basics. I wait for students to finish writing, and then discuss the content after they write. To keep them listening after writing, I randomly call on students to ask questions about what I'm discussing. That seems to work well....
     
  14. CindyBlue

    CindyBlue Cohort

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    Oct 13, 2009

    I teach them using a modified Cornell notetaking system (it's online - you can Google it.). I really like this...it has a place for notes, and a side column to write down three or four really important concepts after reviewing their notes or talking with a classmate.
    I lecture or do an example, then move away from the overhead and "talk around the subject" to give them time to write the example or notes - I specifically teach them to look for teacher behavior such as this. We do a lot of classwork examples together for reinforcement. I also teach them about things teachers say and do that mean something critical is coming up (repetition, verbal emphasis, etc.) I encourage them to share notes with a fellow student in order to catch things they themselves may have missed.
    I focus on notetaking skills pretty constantly during the first quarter, sometimes collecting notes to check, especially the ones not doing well in class so we can work on this skill. They really need to learn to take effective notes!
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2009
  15. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    I tried the Cornell notes last year and it did work, personally, with me. I do know a teacher that uses them. Primarily because I forgot about having them do certain things with it :lol:

    If I didn't do Powerpoints, they would be absolutely lost. I found that using that is the best. I had a couple students last year like me writing it out on the board-but geesh, doing that 4 times a day is tiring!

    I did try letting them write, then talk a little yesterday and referenced the powerpoints, asked them questions. I'll see how it works tomorrrow. I do minimal notes on the slides, I don't put EVERYTHING that we talk about. I make notes on them that we will be discussing like:
    First Amendment-

    1. Freedom of Religion:
    -no off. religion
    -can/not practice religion

    Then we talk about it as a whole and in more depth.

    Thanks for the responses..I like hearing different avenues..makes me think more!
     
  16. elainemagabilin

    elainemagabilin New Member

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    Oct 14, 2009

    taking notes

    Hi. I think, it is better to let your students have a time to copy first your notes so that by the time you start to discuss the lesson your students will have their full attention and focus to you and to your lesson. It is better that you will not put everything in your powerpoint, (or in the material that you used)etc. so that your students will listen to you as you discuss it and on the same time they will also write the important points that you discuss.


    elaine
    Elaine Magabilin
    Manila, Philippines
     
  17. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Oct 14, 2009

    I've tried a few things in my lecture heavy classroom.

    One thing I found somewhat effective but just too much for my 7th graders was to discuss the entire slide first then black it out (tap B on the keyboard during a PPT show) and have them write the notes then, with nothing to see. This truly forced them to focus during the "pencils down" time and be involved in discussion. The problem was only about half the class got it on any given slide so it took a ton of time to catch everyone up.

    Now, I just lecture right on through the PowerPoint. Kids note-take at such varying speeds that if I have them do notes first I end up with tons of kids just sitting and waiting (which I, as a student absolutely hated). I've found that as long as I go line by line and break the notes up with enough vid clips and quick activities it keeps the kids engaged and processing, even while they are writing.

    I think you've seen my notes but if you haven't, the other thing that helps a ton is color coding. My kids know that green text, for example, is to be read and not written. This keeps the notes flowing without requiring quite so much writing. I'd say that little change alone has done more for my notes than any other.
     
  18. CindyBlue

    CindyBlue Cohort

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    Oct 14, 2009

    Thanks for your post - I learned something (how to black out the powerpoint - cool!) and the color coding idea!
     
  19. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    Rockguy-

    Yes I'm quite familiar with your site..i use the assignments alot. I tried your color coding two years ago and I had students with color-blindness so I had to stop doing it. Though the students 'got it', It didn't benefit when I spent the time still pointing out what to write, I also noticed that they weren't reading the colors to read, they just searched for the colors that they had to write. I really like the idea..just doesn't fly in my classes at the moment. I did not know about the letter "B" blacking out the PPt. Hmm....Thanks!
     
  20. Doug_HSTeach_07

    Doug_HSTeach_07 Comrade

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    Oct 23, 2009

    This is my biggest problem ever. I am constantly searching for answers!

    What I have done is "college-style" notes, where the students listen to my lecture that goes along with picture-only PowerPoints. I have only done this a few times and it seems to work well. However, I am thinking that for next semester I will require all students to begin taking them in their journals; I will collect them periodically throughout the year.
     
  21. luv.poem

    luv.poem New Member

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    I think it might be beneficial to have your notes in what I am calling subject-only format. On your power point you can have the subjects without information and a picture or something of that nature. The kids write down the subject, and then what they learned from your lecture. At the end of the lecture there are a few options-they can talk with each other, give examples of what they learned, even a creative mini project to reinforce knowledge like a postcard!
     
  22. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    I'm assuming you are referring to something like: Subject: Mughal Empire. Picture on powerpoint: Map of India or picture of an emperor or Taj Mahal. The teacher talks about the subject and students right down from just listening the imp. info to know/for testing purposes..is this what you mean? This is not to sound harsh at all...great idea in theory..however, high school students are rarely like college age, where they can (and will) listen to lecture without even bulleted points on a ppt-and be able to write down the important info on notes. Now, I'm sure that many will contradict me and say that they conduct their lectures without visual aids and their students can take down the information by just listening. That's wonderful!! and I wish! But especially for my 9th graders-not even feasible. On a side note, I do a few 'projects' throughout the unit/chapter/theme that goes along and assists in understanding the information.
     
  23. luv.poem

    luv.poem New Member

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    Yeah, that's what I mean! :p
     
  24. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I agree... particularly with freshman, part of what we need to teach is how to take notes. Simply putting headings up probably won't cut it with a lot of 14 year olds.

    Today in my Algebra I class, I was teaching a new concept. I put my usual "Process" notes up-- basically a how-to. Then we did a few more problems. When someone had a good question, I answered it, then told every kid in the room to paraphrase what I had just said. I told them that simply copying down what goes on the board isn't enough; they have to write notes to themselves (hence the term "NOTEBOOK!!") to explain all those things not on the board.

    Kids don't intuitively enter high school knowing how to decipher the important from the trivial. Part of our job as teachers is to teach them how to organize and prioritize material. Not only will it help them in our classes, but it will help them to better learn information outside of class.
     
  25. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    I agree Alice...

    I have students that don't understand the concept of abbreviating notes so they aren't writing so much. Using symbols that maybe only they know-even told them to write in txt frm and I get blank stares.

    My point of having them keep a notebook is to learn organizational skills and responsibility in keeping something of importance and keeping it up to date throughout the year. I never look at how they took notes when I grade the notebooks. Everyone takes them different, its IF they did them and the point of them actually USING them to study :)confused: study?? what's that??) for tests...
     
  26. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 29, 2009

    Me too! I encourage them to abbreviate, to use arrows and symbols, to paraphrase.

    But they have to be taught this. Simpy assuming that they can do this is a recipe for failure.
     
  27. Historyteaching

    Historyteaching Cohort

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    oh I know!

    I've demonstrated and a few do it, others are just adamant that they can't understand their notes unless they write them all out. Oh well....
     
  28. Ross

    Ross Comrade

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    Oct 29, 2009

    I also demonstrate to the students various ways to abbreviate words and use symbols when taking notes.

    They are told the notes are for their use, so they should experiment with different ways of abbreviating and symbol usage. They can use any form they want, as long as it works for them.

    I encourage the students to try various ways until they are happy with the results. They are also told that their note taking with evolve over time and they will become more adept at the process.
     
  29. beccmo

    beccmo Comrade

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    Oct 29, 2009

    I have been trying to get my students to take abbreviated notes. I think out of 90 freshman, maybe 10 actually abbreviate on their own. Others will write word for word from my powerpoints or the board. So I am modelling abbreviated notes a lot. The only abbreviations they use are mine, and then they forget what they mean. Argh!

    My juniors and seniors are much better, but some feel they are too smart to need to take notes (for physics). They don't realize that when college comes, notetaking will come in handy.
     

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