Teaching with Rigor

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by cutelilram, Feb 6, 2012.

  1. cutelilram

    cutelilram Rookie

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    Feb 6, 2012

    I teach at a school that keeps saying there needs to be more rigor in the student work. However, they don't say how to go about making the work more rigorous. I follow the programs they want us to teach. What can I do to add rigor to student work while still doing the curriculum?

    Thanks so much!
     
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  3. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Feb 6, 2012

    Be careful~ schools say they want rigor for their students but sometimes when you actually provide it it upsets the students, which upsets parents and they complain to the admins about you. I should know ;)

    You might want to check out this book too: http://rigorineducation.blogspot.com/ I haven't read it but it might help you to better understand what rigor in a learning environment is.
     
  4. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Feb 6, 2012

    rigor is a buzz word that is going through the administration nation wide. I would just look at it as two things. Make sure you challenge the students with the 1. quality and 2. quantity of the work they do. I wouldn't worry about it too much. This can be a fun opportunity to take a lesson to the next level by making it more meaningful and getting the children to think a bit deeper.
     
  5. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    Feb 7, 2012

    I was going to throw out 'buzz word,' but it looks like readingrules 12 beat me to it.

    Since you said it is coming from administration, but you are still confused, could you politely ask for some more details and perhaps some examples to guide you?
     
  6. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Feb 7, 2012

    One way to provide some rigor without completely changing the curriculum is to ask the students to explain their answer for one or two problems.

    In math, this could be explain the steps and their reasons for solving a math problem, drawing a picture to support their answer, talking with another student about different ways to solve the same problem.

    In reading, this could be making an inference and then explaining why they could make this inference, instead of just defining words in context, explain how they figured out what the word means.
     
  7. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Feb 7, 2012

    Until you know how the admin defines 'rigor' in both words and examples, you won't know what he wants. If you get the list of definitions from Meriam-Webster, some of those definitions aren't something we want to 'do' to kids.
     
  8. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Feb 7, 2012

    Typically it means going into more depth with the activities the students are doing. It may be a buzzword but I think we are often going to far toward preparing these kids for multiple choice tests and getting away from the more open-ended questions. We aren't teaching the kids to really think in any relevant way, to solve real-life problems, just everything on the surface.

    Is there a certain objective or area you are looking for sample lessons in?
     
  9. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Feb 7, 2012

    When I was in school, "rigor" was what happened to teachers who were so old that they just sat there in class and didn't say anything or do anything. Sometimes they'd start to smell funny.
     
  10. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Feb 9, 2012

    I think rigor in education means making them think...stretching the limits...challenging them to go beyond simple one step problems or answer that only require them to spit out facts they've memorized. Take a look at Bloom's Taxonomy or google Depth of Knowledge for some ways to move lessons up a notch on the rigor scale =)

    Some easy things to do include having students get used to working through problems that require several steps, providing students with opportunities to explain or justify their answers/methods, and allowing students to have discussions about concepts with one another with little teacher involvement (like facilitating rather than leading every discussion.)

    Also- any time a student has an opportunity to be creative, it bumps things up a little. For example, rather than having students do a worksheet where they circle all the adjectives in sentences, give out index cards and have each student write a noun on their card...then have them pass their cards to the next person who looks at the noun and then writes an adjective to describe the noun on the back...then students switch again. THEN, you read the adjectives and decide as a class (or in small groups) if the words are actually adjectives. This moves students from simple recollection of what an adjective is to generating adjectives, analyzing other people's adjectives, and justifying their own adjectives...
     
  11. Mrs Teacher

    Mrs Teacher Rookie

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    Feb 11, 2012

    I completely agree. We've been talking about this a lot in our building as well. Basically brainstorming how we can step it up in our lesson plans
     

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