teaching The Breakfast Club

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by mshutchinson, Feb 4, 2012.

  1. mshutchinson

    mshutchinson Comrade

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    Feb 4, 2012

    My kids didn't learn the elements of fiction the first time around, so I'm reteaching. I was thinking of using this movie In Class. The two elements that stand out are characterization and theme. Has anyone noticed other elements or actually used this film toteach? Any thoughts of ideas?
     
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  3. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Feb 4, 2012

    The movie is rated R and has the f-word in it at least 20 times. It also has drug use, sexual references, and talks about various types of child abuse. I would not show this movie in class.

    I would choose a different movie that is rated PG or PG-13 (depending on the movie and the reason for the rating) and teach using that. For my film studies class, I use "Music and Lyrics" to teach exposition (I stop it before it gets to the half-dressed pop star) and I've used other movies to show other plot-related things.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Feb 4, 2012

    I agree-- it is NOT a movie I would choose to show in class.

    In additon, it's something like an hour and a half. Can you really afford to spend that much time to illustrate characterization and theme? Wouldn't a half hour episode of M*A*S*H accomplish the same thing?
     
  5. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    Feb 4, 2012

    I too was thinking that as much as I enjoyed the movie it's not appropriate to show at school. I can't think of another movie to use in its place but maybe this site can give you some suggestions for what you're looking for.
    http://www.teachwithmovies.org/
     
  6. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Feb 4, 2012

    I agree. I show few full-length movies in my film studies classes, and they are devoted to film.
     
  7. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Feb 4, 2012

    This is a great resource, but I question the age recommendations they put on some of these movies. Good Will Hunting is listed as appropriate for ages 14 and up, and it is rated R. it has the f-word in it over 100 times! I know I would have a seriously hard time getting that movie approved to show at my school. We basically can't show anything with nudity or unnecessary strong language. Nothing rated R. If you show any movie in class make sure you have screened it and that you are able to defend why it was necessary to show. (I show a scene from The Godfather that is a bit gory, but it is a perfect example of intercutting. I could easily defend its relevance and importance.)
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 4, 2012

    As others have said, The Breakfast Club is a great movie but not appropriate for school. Find something else.
     
  9. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Feb 4, 2012

    Why did you choose this particular movie?
     
  10. mshutchinson

    mshutchinson Comrade

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    Feb 4, 2012

    Just to address the concerns:
    I never have shown a whole movie in my class. My intention is to take the pieces I want from this movie, and use those. I'm not worried about the rating.

    I chose this movie because the characterization is very obvious, and the kids will relate more to those charaters than, say - Hotlips Houlihan.
     
  11. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Feb 4, 2012

    I've used episodes of "Saved by the Bell" to teach the following:
    - characterization
    - theme
    - plot development (fits the perfect exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution/denouement line)
    - conflict
    - point of view

    It's corny, but "clean"
     
  12. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Feb 4, 2012

    There may be more modern and more appropriate movies to choose. When we talk about eye-line matches, I use some scenes from the show My So-Called Life. There's some really great characterization there, and no cursing. Also, the opening sequences from different movies could be good: Shaft (has a curse word I usually mute for a second,) The Perfect Score (or really any teen movie with stereotypical characters like that,) The Godfather (check for language, but I think the first scene is pretty clean,) maybe Citizen Kane. I just think there are better choices that would be more current.
     
  13. mshutchinson

    mshutchinson Comrade

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    Feb 4, 2012

    ku_alum - I never even thought about Saved by the Bell. I think that would be perfect- minimal editing required.

    I'm not too familiar with many movies - my short attention span doesn't allow me to be a movie buff. I have never seen any of the titles you listed, MissCelia. I've heard about My so-Called Life - are there specific episodes that would be good for particular elements?

    My kids tend to relate based on age, not era. They dig Mercutio- it doesn't get any less current than that.
     
  14. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Feb 5, 2012

    I just typed out a very long response, but the cat jumped on my keyboard and managed to erase the whole thing. I would look at the pilot episode, "Resolutions," and "The Boiler Room." The last one has a really good sequence at the end with almost no dialogue where they define relationships between characters using eye-line matches in the editing. "Resolutions" starts out with multiple narrators. Probably any first episode of any teen drama would be good because that is when the characters are introduced.
     
  15. becky

    becky Enthusiast

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    Feb 26, 2012

    mshutchinson, have you ever heard of the Nickelodeon show, Victorious? They did an episode that was supposed to be just like The Breakfast Club. Check into that..it might be something you could use.
     
  16. Speechy

    Speechy Comrade

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    Feb 26, 2012

    I would go with The Breakfast Club. Despite the language, it's a wonderful movie and a lot can be learned from it. I think you could make a work.

    You could always get a TV edited copy of TBC if you are concerned about the language.
     
  17. becky

    becky Enthusiast

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    Feb 27, 2012

    I did think there was a place to get edited videos like you're describing.
     
  18. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 27, 2012

    What can be learned from it, specifically in an educational setting as part of the mandated curriculum? I love the movie, but I think that many aspects of it are not school appropriate.
     
  19. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Feb 27, 2012

    My daughter and I were just talking about My So Called Life yesterday. I loved that show. If you can work it out with Breakfast Club, then I'm sure you can generate a lot of good discussion. I wonder, is there anything more contemporary or have all the recent shows/movies gotten too raunchy for use?
     
  20. becky

    becky Enthusiast

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