Teaching Reading

Discussion in 'General Education' started by a2z, Sep 21, 2019.

  1. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,699
    Likes Received:
    1,604

    Sep 21, 2019

    Tired Teacher likes this.
  2.  
  3. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    3,220
    Likes Received:
    1,574

    Sep 21, 2019

    It was a great read.

    But I also felt a bit out of touch.

    I was taught phonics only. I was trained to teach phonics only. This is the first time I've heard of the 3-cue system.

    Is this really a thing?
     
  4. Mami1Maestra2

    Mami1Maestra2 Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2015
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    24

    Sep 21, 2019

    I feel like I wrote this article myself! The school in which I work now is a 3 cueing system school, heavy on Calkins and F & P. Our school's reading proficiency is still low, despite sinking money into these programs.
     
    bella84 and a2z like this.
  5. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2015
    Messages:
    1,226
    Likes Received:
    417

    Sep 21, 2019

    This makes me cringe. I'm glad my district teaches actual reading
     
  6. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    3,969
    Likes Received:
    216

    Sep 22, 2019

    You know, I knew phonics from a young age, but I was taught to read using whole language. I didn't learn to read until the end of 1st grade (which was typical way back then.. we didn't learn our alphabet letters until the beginning of 1st grade) and still somehow I learned to be a terrific reader -- to of my school by 5th grade -- reading on a college level.

    I have a hard time understanding how it can be so hard to teach young children to read now days -- I think it is partly because of all these "systems' that don't really teach children to read.
     
  7. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,699
    Likes Received:
    1,604

    Sep 22, 2019

    Unfortunately, it is. My district claims to have taught phonics because they taught children to at least look at the first letter and use it's sound as a basis for the guess based on cues. They even actively believed that as long as the meaning was intact when the student finished the sentence it was fine. The words "read" aloud could all be different than those on the page, but if the idea was the same, they were good to go. It was all about making meaning from print rather than reading what was on the page.
     
    bella84 and Backroads like this.
  8. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,699
    Likes Received:
    1,604

    Sep 22, 2019

    There are people who can pick up the phonics patterns and patterns in words easily. I would say that is about 30% of students. No matter what you do with these kids, they will learn to read if there is material to read.

    Many schools depend on parents to teach their children to read these days. The first question when a child is struggling to learn to read is not "What is working in our current program?" It is, "What is the parent doing with the student at home?" So, if a parent doesn't have one of the 30% kids and doesn't really know how to teach their child how to read when they don't pick it up naturally (and you can read to a child every day and still end up with a non-reader no matter what others would like to tell you), the child doesn't learn to read well or tops out at upper elementary when the words get beyond simple words.

    When you have a child-bearing age generation who was not taught how to read well and schools aren't doing it either, you have students who can't read except for about 30%.

    Why do wealthy people's children read well? Well, most likely they are the ones teaching their children to read well because they know how to read well and know how to teach their children or can hire tutors to do so.
     
    Tired Teacher likes this.
  9. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2019
    Messages:
    398
    Likes Received:
    194

    Sep 22, 2019

    This is not a conversation I'd have with any teacher here today in person....lol Most teachers here went to college when "Whole Language" was the rage. (about 40 to 50 yr olds now)
    I was trained in a very structured phonics and sight word reading program for yrs, but do not remember the name of it. Phonics was on a leveled system that included 3rd grade. Just 1 example is the sound shun was on the list. The kids needed to learn tion, sion, cian made the same sound. Another 3rd grade sound was ious like in glorious. There were a lot more, but I'll refrain...lol We had pages of 3rd grade sight words too. The program worked.
    A bunch of us started teaching at a new school about 35 yrs ago. We all learned to teach reading this way. Then all of a sudden, "Whole Language" became the rage. When it came, none of the staff who had seen the results from the phonics/sight words camp wanted to even try it because we knew what we had worked. We were a very high performing school and our kids could read. Admin knew whose kids were learning and left you alone. Many of us "got away" with not moving to WL. Whole Language became the rage where I was at about the same time as No Child Left Behind.
    New teachers trickled in who embraced it. Many of us shut our doors and kept teaching the old system, but parts of Whole Language made their way to us and I think some work too like reading in context when needed. Context words were not the big focus though.
    Fast forward to today and a different state: Kids are given books like the ones described in the article in kindergarten and 1st grade.
    They are taught the absolute basics of phonics only. Many kids choke in 2-3 grades when the pictures lessen or totally go away in books. They are dependent upon having parents who read the books and to memorize them. Many parents do not practice here and aides sometimes do with those kids.
    The kids guess when they don't know a word. Usually their guesses are incorrect because they do not understand what they are saying (reading). Our kids do not even know the difference between vowels and consonants. They are taught au, aw, oo, ou, er, ir, ur, ow, and more when I get my hand's on them, but it is almost too late for some. They've already learned the guessing strategy.The house and horse example the article gives is an exact example I have seen problems with for many years.
    My mom labeled everything in our house as kids from beds to cabinets with words. She taught us phonics and we all learned to read before going to kindergarten. I did the same with my kids.
    I saw the impact of a strong, structured phonetic/sight word program for many yrs. Once I moved here, I had 3rd graders who did not know the sounds that your average ending 1st grader would have known where I came from. Now I see many kids who can't read worth beans. It is really sad.
    In both areas a lot of the parents were poor, so I know that is not the reason. Where I was in TX people valued education though a lot more than here. That is part of it, but I still think structured, in depth phonics, sight words, and vocabulary are the basics of reading. Most people nowadays would disagree, but this has been my experience and opinion.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2019

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. ally06,
  2. MrsC,
  3. Kelster95
Total: 159 (members: 4, guests: 134, robots: 21)
test