Teaching Reading

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by Miss J. Pre-K, Apr 26, 2011.

  1. Miss J. Pre-K

    Miss J. Pre-K Comrade

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    Apr 26, 2011

    My mother babysits a boy who is currently in first grade. He is like a second son to her, and I'm asking this on her behalf. He is reading level 12 or 13 books, although not very fluently (person reading with him has to help about every 3rd or 4th word). I'm not sure he should actually be taking home books at this level. He seems to have trouble with longer words, contractions, and when sounding out words, he usually only knows one way a letter can sound. (For instance, when sounding out a word with the letter "o", he thinks it always says "ooo" instead of "ow" or the "o" sound; shoot instead of show or owl.) I've read with him and noticed this. He has ADHD, and his teacher has started testing for a learning disability.

    My mom wants to help tutor him this summer when he stays at her house about 1 day a week. What can she do to work with him? My experience is primarily in pre-k, I know how to teach letters and letter sounds; not words. What are some helpful books or websites or strategies you can tell me about? :)
     
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  3. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

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    Apr 26, 2011

    Start with a phonics screener. Try googling Quick Phonics Screener. It is pretty diagnostic and lets you know what sounds he is missing. It sounds like he should be reading decodable books, and not leveled books just yet. I'm sorry I don't know the exact websites but I know you can download decodable books, maybe even on this site.??
     
  4. puff5655

    puff5655 Cohort

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    Apr 26, 2011

    I would ask his teacher. She/he probably already has a lot of assessment data, and will be more than happy to provide you with resources/strategies to help this student out.
     
  5. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Apr 27, 2011

    Definitely ask the teacher for assessment data or even the parent (she may already have some of this).

    In first grade, students are still learning sounds. So, take what you do in pre-K and apply it to more difficult sounds. He needs to learn the sounds of our language. He may know the 26 basic sounds, but he needs to work on the digraphs, diphthongs, and blends from the sound of it. Maybe your mom could work on these sounds this summer.

    Also, work on saying each sound and then blending it together. Use questions like, does that sound like a real word to you? what sound do you think we could flip and try again?
     
  6. NightSky

    NightSky Rookie

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    Jun 25, 2011

    Helpful books or websites:

    Abecedarian reading program (abcdrp.com)
    Phonics International
    I See Sam books
    Phonics Pathways
    Alphaphonics

    These are all fairly inexpensive programs, and most could be resold on ebay at a later time.

    Best of luck to your mother and the student.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jun 25, 2011

    I've never heard of any of these.
     
  8. NightSky

    NightSky Rookie

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    Jun 25, 2011

    That is likely because they are not used in gen ed classrooms in the U.S.
    Abecedarian is used in schools, but primarily for RTI Tiers 2 & 3, and it is used by homeschoolers and tutors. Phonics International is fairly new, but is now being used in some schools in the U.K. and by tutors. The I See Sam books were developed by a U.S.-funded Educational Lab in the 1970s, when they were used in many classrooms in the U.S. They are now being published by two different companies in the U.S. and by others in the U.K. and Australia. Phonics Pathways and Alphaphonics are very inexpensive books that are popular with homeschoolers. Because these are all easy to use (to a varying degree), and systematic, they might be just the thing the OP's mother is looking for. The first two programs incorporate spelling as well as reading.
     

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