Teaching Procedures and Such in HS

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Mathemagician, Jul 28, 2012.

  1. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    Jul 28, 2012

    Last week I attended my district's classroom management course. It was pretty good, but it was K-12. They emphasized teaching/modeling procedures and rules to the students. They kept saying that this applies to HS too. Thinking back on my HS year, I can't remember many teachers teaching rules/procedures with exceptions for courses like gym and art perhaps. They told us the rules and how things would work, but that's about it. I suppose it could be that I was in all honors classes in HS, but I find the idea of teaching procedures and rules to HS students as you would to elementary students a bit strange...

    So HS teachers....how much time do you spend actually teaching rules and procedures? How do you teach them? I was originally thinking of just going through rather quickly the first day, but I'm wondering how much you emphasize them?
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I probably spend 10 minutes on my expectations and procedures-- what happens if you miss homework, how often I quiza, that sort of thing.

    Then I start to teach.
     
  4. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    That sounds quite ideal. Do you spend time assigning books or getting to know the students at all on the first day?
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    No, our kids get their books from their individual districts.

    Honestly, with 5 classes plus a study hall that first day, I'm meeting anywhere from 230 to 500 kids that day (probably closer to 230, unless I'm one of 4 teachers in a cafeteria study hall.) The odds of anything I say or do really helping me to "get to know" my kids on that day are incredibly small.

    We get to know each other in the coming days, as we explore the subject matter.

    I just yesterday got an email from another Senior requesting yet another college letter of recommendation. (I think that makes 34 for next year's Seniors for me.) I DO get to know my kids well, just not on that first day.
     
  6. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    That's interesting with the books...so do they all have different textbooks then?

    As far the getting to know you thing, I was thinking of doing some sort of icebreaker since most of my geometry students will be freshman new to the high school.
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    No, they all have the same text. Private schools around here (not just Catholic schools) put out their book lists in the spring. Textbooks and busses (within a particular radius) are supplied by the districts.

    I'll have one frosh geometry class too, along with 4 sophs.
     
  8. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    I usually go over the syllabus, do some "getting to know you" type things, and play a content-related game. There are several reasons for that: I teach preformance-based subjects, so the students need to immediately feel comfortable performing in front of each other, and I need to immediately establish routines for that. Our school is notorious for schedule changes during the first few days. I'll still be getting new students all during the first week, and if I start to lecture, they'll start out behind on the information through no fault of their own. Our classes are often randomly shortened during the first few days, so it keeps all of my classes together, at least at the start.
     
  9. MissApple

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    Jul 28, 2012

    I go over general procedures during the first day or two, but save any detailed procedures for when it's relevant, so on their first quiz day we review expectations for quizzes. It makes it more relevant so I think it sticks better.
     
  10. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Like Alice, I only spend a few minutes introducing myself and showing them where the important information about my class can be found on the learning management system we use online. Then we get started on our first unit (which, as an ELA teacher, is a "get to know you" activity masked as a reading/writing assignment.)

    I teach "procedures" as they come up in class, and I address rules the same way. You can do an in depth discussion of your late work policy, but they aren't going to care about it until they turn in an assignment late! LOL! Then you'll have to go over it again.
     
  11. HistTchr

    HistTchr Habitué

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    That's exactly what I do. I go over my syllabus with the procedures, rules, etc. on the first day, but spend more time discussing each one when the time comes in class. One thing I do on the first day of school is give a "syllabus quiz" for homework. It has about 20 questions relating to the course expectations that they need to answer by going through the syllabus again.
     
  12. beccmo

    beccmo Comrade

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    :love: I love this idea!!!
     
  13. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    What Band wrote.
     
  14. 2ndTimeAround

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    I only teach a couple of procedures the first day. I run a tight ship so I have a lot of procedures.

    One of my biggies is taught about three days in. I teach a lot of honors students whose main goal in life is to show off how smart they are :) Those that tend to be a little more geeky and insecure REALLY want the teacher to think they are the smartest in the class. So they'll blurt out answers before anyone ever gets a chance to raise their hand. I teach the students about wait time. We practice with silly examples. "What is 2 plus 2?"
     
  15. HistTchr

    HistTchr Habitué

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    Thanks! :)
    I have done that for several years. It's a nice way for students to start off the year with a good grade, too. (Actually, I don't really count it as a quiz grade. I enter it as a 10 point homework grade.)
     
  16. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    I've got a quiz planned for my policies and procedures (it's not technically a syllabus) and I will emphasize a few procedures from day one. We have so many kids with schedule changes the first few days that I really need to establish a routine that newcomers can pick up quickly.
     
  17. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

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    This is normally what I do as well, but there are exceptions.

    Two years ago, out of my four classes, I had one that was absolutely out. of. control. In the end, I had to type up a list of rules and procedures in great detail. I photocopied it onto bright pink paper and had the students put it at the beginning of their binders. At the beginning of each class, we read through them together. If a student didn't follow a certain rule or procedure, I had them read that specific rule out loud and then correct their behaviour. It was the only way I could have any semblance of control with that group.

    Funny enough, that was a Spanish class. I also taught many of those students Math. In Math, they were the most polite, hard-working students you could ever come across. I guess the make up of the Spanish class was just less than ideal.

    It was a long year.
     
  18. HistTchr

    HistTchr Habitué

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    I had a really difficult 9th grade group a few years ago. Just going over my rules/procedures on day one was not at all sufficient for them to understand the expected behaviors. They were a lower level class, co-taught with a special education teacher, with every desk in the classroom packed. Because they needed so much extra structure, we used what was basically an elementary classroom management system so they always knew exactly where they stood. The class earned points each day for following procedures and rules correctly, and students who broke the rules had a clear set of consequences that we went through so they always knew where they stood (e.g. 1st offense=warning, 2nd offense=stay after class, 3rd offense=detention/call home, 4th offense=referral). They actually loved the system and begged the other teachers on my team to use it, too.

    Sometimes I guess you have to just "feel out" a certain group at first to see what exactly they need. I knew early on that this particular group needed a very clearly defined system, but I have never used a system like that with any other high school class I have taught.
     
  19. Catcherman22

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    Jul 29, 2012

    I spend 10-15 mins talking about the class, reviewing the syllabus etc.. I may spend a few minutes if I don't know the kids talking about myself.. but generally I know most of the students so I leave that for other times. As said, the getting to know you happens as the weeks progress.

    I then take the kids to check out their books. At our school, the math classes "volunteered" to take the students for book checkout.. so they check out all their books.

    When we get back from that, I dive into reviewing solving equations with alg 2 and reviewing factoring with pre calc.

    If I need to explain a procedure, it happens when I need it. I don't spend much time on rules, as they're in high school... if they want to be treated as an adult, I expect them to act like one.
     
  20. Special-t

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    I'm just going to go over our school-wide classroom rules, and my personal rules about borrowing supplies, bathroom passes and tardiness. I figure my student's are going to do introductory activities in their larger classes, so I'm just going to say hello and start a an activity that leads into their first unit.
     
  21. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I will probably spend a couple of minutes handling rules on the first day. In the past I've done a social contract, which is much more in-depth, but I think I'm going to nix that for this coming year.

    As for procedures, I have a number of those and teach them as the need arises. The first time students turn in work, we go over how they should do that. The first time they use the laptops, we go over how they should do that. I often repeat instructions for procedures on several occasions at the beginning of the year. My goal is to have an automated classroom where students know what needs to be done and do it without a lot of prompting from me. It makes my life so much easier. I think it makes theirs better, too, because it empowers them to handle things like the young adults that they are.
     
  22. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    This is what I do except it's copied onto bright orange paper. If a student does not follow a procedure I ask them what the procedure is. If they magically forgot (which will happen all the way to June) I have them get out the packet and read the procedures out loud. If they don't have thier orange packet there is always someone willing to share, and I always have extras. I like it because I find the students never argue about why they needed to break procedure.
     
  23. ACardAttack

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    This, I am putting rules up on my wall so I can refer to them because where I teach, the kids even high school seniors need reminding once in a while of the rules
     
  24. Hooligan

    Hooligan Rookie

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    I also have them sign the classroom expectations and procedure sheets and have them bring them home for their parents to sign. they turn them in for a 10 point assignment. I teach Anatomy and Physiology and last year I did not put the mandatory animal dissection part on the syllabus so I had to come up with alternative activities for those students who were unwilling to perform the dissections. That will not happen again. I also keep these things on hand so that when the parents complain later that little Timmy has a zero on a test...can he still take it? Ummm...no...the graded tests have already been returned. He had ample time after he returned to take the test and did not bother to schedule a testing time. It is not my job to remind the students. Their grade is their responsibility. If the parents signed the procedure slip, then they should know. I also post this procedures document on my weblink on the schools website. As a nurse, (I just transitioned into teaching last year) I feel the need to CMA anywhere I can!
     
  25. Go Blue!

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    Aug 18, 2012

    I work in large, urban, inner-city district. I have taught at three different schools in this district and all three were (and still are) wild and chaotic. Thus, I go over my rules and expectation, as well as the school's rules and expectations, everyday for the first few weeks in class. I do not teach in a school where certain common sense expectations are just followed and thus, I can quickly adress them and move on. Some rules/expectations must be repeated on a regular basis.

    For example, I constantly have to review things like the "no head gear" rule - which is not my rule but a school rule. My girls love to come to school with their hair wrapped or pinned curled and their hair bonnets/head scarves on, especially if they have somewhere to go afterschool or its raining. And just saying, "please take it" often leads to a fight only Admin can solve. Thus, I try to constantly reiterate the rules so that if I have to send a student to Admin, they atleast KNOW they have broken a rule (even if they don't understand why the rule exists). I don't want my students saying to Admin they never heard of such-and-such rule.
     
  26. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    In my distance learning (online) world, I send out an introductory email with a PowerPoint detailing my expectations as well as basic dos and don'ts for thriving in my class. The first assignment of the class is a scavenger hunt that gets them looking around my class web page for the basics (my syllabus, help sites, school late work policy). By the time I've confirmed the email was opened, graded the scavenger hunt and called students who needed help finding all pieces of it, I can at least confirm the students have been fully exposed to classroom procedures.
     
  27. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    Unfortunately, the maturity level of most high schools students in our area is SO LOW, you have to treat them like elementary school students.

    :huh:
     
  28. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    **
     
  29. Historyteaching

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    I teach freshman and I will show them, not just tell them the procedures for say: turning in their work, makeup work, bathroom sign in/out sheet, etc.

    I will walk over to the area hold it up, show them, etc and I do this a few times during the first couple of days. Today was our 8th day in class, I went back over a few rules/procedures since its been over a week since it was mentioned.

    I don't start teaching until the 4th or 5th day, due to schedule changes that can take almost the entire first week, even today I had 3 kids that were on my roster, "moved", and are now back, plus a couple of just getting things rearranged. It's getting better only lasting 5 days, but it has in years past taken almost 2 weeks.
     
  30. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Invading MS teacher here. How would you go about teaching them for MS? I'm planning on doing an "as it comes" basis, but I don't know if they'd get any benefit from me typing and printing out a booklet. I'm kind of leery of doing that because I have a feeling it will come out as a lot of words and the kids will just be turned off by it.

    I do plan on creating print-outs that have the most important procedures on them and taping them to the walls for easy reference.
     
  31. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Don't waste your time making a booklet or handout with your procedures. In my experience, students won't read them and might even become overwhelmed.

    Address procedures as the need arises. Little signs or posters in relevant areas is a great idea. For example, I have a small poster that looks like a sheet of paper with the kind of header I require (name, date, class period, topic). I post this near where students turn in work.
     
  32. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    :D Thanks!
     

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