Teaching Procedures and Rules

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Drama Teach, Jul 8, 2011.

  1. Drama Teach

    Drama Teach Rookie

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    Jul 8, 2011

    How do you teach the students the rules and procedures during the first week?

    Last year I went over them and then practiced the first day how to enter the classroom.

    Do you practice every procedure?

    How many days do you practice?
     
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  3. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    No, I have never done any of these things. I typically go over a few rules, discuss the class and a few things I do differently from other teachers, and then we start class. On the first day I tell them I expect them enter class, find their seats and begin working on their bell work. Honestly, I can't imagine practicing how to enter a classroom with high schoolers.
     
  4. The Fonz

    The Fonz Math teacher (for now...)

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    i spend the entire first day going over policies and if i have time left over, i teach.

    no practicing procedures....its highschool, if you don't get it right the first time, detention.
     
  5. Math

    Math Cohort

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    Wow.
     
  6. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    Jul 9, 2011

    I briefly explain my class and syllabus, and dive right in. I tell the kids that "by high school, you know how school works, and you know how you're expected to behave". I might mention a few things I do slightly differently than others (such as turning assignments into a tray when they walk in the door), but otherwise, it's right down to business. I've never had any real issues.

    If a group or individual kid ends up doing something particularly problematic, I address it when it comes up. But otherwise, I begin teaching on day one.
     
  7. Catcherman22

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    Jul 9, 2011

    I'm also the same.

    go over syllabus, talk about my differences to what they might be used to, and then start class.

    In high school.. they should know how to behave.
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jul 9, 2011

    I spend the first 10 minutes, then teach.

    The seldom get it wrong after that. If it is something major, say cheating, I agree: detention. If it's something smaller, say gum, I deal with it quickly and we move on.

    I can't imagine what procedures we would have to "practice."
     
  9. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jul 9, 2011

    Same here. I go over a couple of basics, then we get started. I don't know anyone who practices procedures at the high school level.
     
  10. Drama Teach

    Drama Teach Rookie

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    Jul 9, 2011

    At my school they want us spending the first week just working on procedures. It is a title I high school so I don't know if that has to do with it.
     
  11. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Yikes! If I didn't start with content that first week, I'd be really behind. I spend a day going over expectations and the syllabus, and doing a quick ice breaker or two, and then I start with something content related: a pretest, a writing assignment, something.
     
  12. Ms.SLS

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    Wow.. I spent three years at a Title 1 school. I spent one day discussing rules and doing "getting to know you" writing assignments, and then moved on.

    I think if you tell them your expectations, yes, they will test it, but if you deal with it as you told them you would on day 1, there's no need to spend a week. For example, I tell my kids I expect them to come in and sit down by the time the last bell rings. When I have ten kids waiting outside until the bell rings and then come in yelling and shoving, THEN we get up, go outside and do it again right. They're typically very irritated they have to get up, and properly ashamed to be treated like 6 year olds.
     
  13. The Fonz

    The Fonz Math teacher (for now...)

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    Jul 9, 2011

    well, by procedures i am also including grading policy, how grades work (I use the point system, so i explain that to kids that are unfamiliar), i give an outline of the course and my expectations for the class....i don't have many discipline procedures to go over other than the usual: food/gum, late, cheating, etc.

    It's highschool and the students know what is expected from them and how to behave. If they don't get it right the first time (which really isn't the first time since they've been in school at least 9 years at this point), they know they're getting a detention. Also, I barely have discipline problems because I am consistent with my policies.
     
  14. The Fonz

    The Fonz Math teacher (for now...)

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    what are you wowing about?
     
  15. Math

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    If they don't get something right the first time.. detention. That's amazing... no warning? You seem very strict. I think they would at least get a chance but it seems not. It's just a lot of thoughts since I'm still a High School student about that post.
     
  16. The Fonz

    The Fonz Math teacher (for now...)

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    Jul 9, 2011

    the warning is day 1.

    by the time you are in 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th grade you should already know that you don't chew gum in class or there is no side conversations in my classroom.

    if i taught elementary or even middle school, i would probably do things differently. But since I am in a high school setting, i treat all students like young adults and make them responsible for their own actions.

    i am strict, but my class is very productive.
     
  17. Math

    Math Cohort

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    Yes I'm well aware of that, though some people may just need a reminder (warning ) then they'll stop. Your going straight to detention for chewing gum? For side chatting it could be a simple warning as well and if it persists then a detention.
     
  18. Go 4th

    Go 4th Habitué

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    Jul 9, 2011

    It sounds like most HS teachers get right to work on the content. Do you do any icebreakers or teambuilding activities?
     
  19. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    I never have. I really don't think any teacher in my building does either
     
  20. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I'm a first year teacher but I know I have to do some sort of icebreaker or else I'll never learn my students' names!
     
  21. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    I do "ice breaker" activities that incorporate writing, reading and speaking because I teach English. It makes sense in my subject area to do so. :)
     
  22. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    I do. We are expected to the first day or so as they get schedules reworked. We're still getting new students the third or fourth day that each class meets.
     
  23. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    I have found name icebreakers to be forced with secondary students, many of them have been together for years.

    The way I learn student names is to make a seating chart. Then, when they are working independently, I quiz myself. Usually by the end of day 2, I have 90% of the names down, but have the seating chart for ref if needed.
     
  24. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I did that in student teaching and got about 80% of them down but what really helped solidify it was getting to know a fact about them and putting it with a face. I did a skittles/m&m icebreaker with my student teaching kids (juniors) and they really enjoyed it. I also did it with seniors and they had a good time too. We asked some goofy questions like "If you could pick any fictional person to be President of the US who would it be?" They seemed to enjoy hearing some of the answers and the seniors actually really enjoyed having their regular classroom teacher participate. We also asked "normal" questions like about hobbies and future plans.
     
  25. The Fonz

    The Fonz Math teacher (for now...)

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    yes...i've done it in the past, guess how many more detentions i had to give for chewing gum?
     
  26. The Fonz

    The Fonz Math teacher (for now...)

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    Jul 9, 2011

    seating chart is definitely the best way to learn names...i do alphabetically for a quarter then quarter 2 i mix them up the way i see fit.
     
  27. Math

    Math Cohort

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    I'm guessing a lot.
     
  28. Go 4th

    Go 4th Habitué

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    I guess I'm wondering how you begin to build relationships with the students if you jump right into the content and don't do things like icebreakers and teambuilding activities? I know that it will come in time, but.......

    I'm elementary and it just seems do different!
     
  29. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jul 10, 2011

    With high school students, relationship building is much more complicated. They need to know they can trust you, that you'll listen to them and that you'll treat them fairly. They see a lot of the ice breaker activities as phoney and trite... much like many adults do in similar situations.
     
  30. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Not in my building either, or in my husband's. (Or in the school in which I first taught.)

    I had never heard of them until I got here.

    Next year I'll teach a total of 9 classes of anywhere from 30 - 41 students each, plus probably a study hall. No games I play on that first day will enable me to build a solid relationship with my kids, or to learn more than one or two names.

    I use my seating chart and some patience, and we get to know each other as we go along. I do a lot of staring and memorizing as I test and quiz.
     
  31. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I'm going to a three-day workshop that starts tomorrow. The content will be fabulous, but I'm dreading all of the "ice-breakers" that I know we'll do; they just aren't something I enjoy.
     
  32. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Jul 10, 2011

    I go over the rules and procedures - but I don't "lecture" them. The kids will learn them soon enough through practice and modeling.
     
  33. ally06

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    I hate ice-breakers as an adult. I don't remember any high school class beginning with anything other than an overview of the content and assignments for the semester and then jumping into work. The relationships developed naturally over the year.

    I have never taught secondary but even teaching little kids I only spend a little bit of time on introductions on the first morning then we start some (easy) work and I teach the classroom procedures as they need them. We get to know each other quite easily and naturally over the course of the school year.
     
  34. Drama Teach

    Drama Teach Rookie

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    Jul 10, 2011

    In my Drama class we do warm up and theatre games all year. I find them extremely usefull in getting the students comfortable with each other to perform in front of each other and they really enjoy the games. It also helps get the warmed up and ready to perform, if they have come from classes where they have been sitting all day, they need something to wake them up.

    I think I will teach them on of the first theatre games that we will use through out the year.
     
  35. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I think it's different in any sort of a "performance" class-- drama or chorus or band or anything of the sort. I can see how you need that warm up.

    But my math classes focus, from day one, on math.
     
  36. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    I completely agree with bandnerd :thumb:
     
  37. misterdee

    misterdee Rookie

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    If there is something that you want done a certain way -- come into the room, get your folder from the basket, and be at your seat with your notebook open when the bell rings -- you can most efficiently teach it by demonstration and a quick practice. People have different learning styles and levels of understanding regardless of their ages.
     
  38. inlovewithwords

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    Jul 14, 2011

    This year instead of reading over the entire syllabus I will pair them up and they will complete a scavenger hunt of the syllabus. I will give them several questions. The last question will be a bit of a trick because it requires them to ask me personally for the answer. This shows that it is important to always ask questions when in doubt. I also do other things but no icebreakers.

    I think it is important to go over your procedures but in high school you have to remember that these students are probably seeing 6 other teachers who are doing the exact same thing in the same day. How boring. Don't you want to be different?
     
  39. looneyteachr

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    Jul 16, 2011

    hallmark hoops and yoyo has their own website with really cool video clips about how to act or do stuff - cute to show 1st week of school

    i had special power pt slides for different transitions - and songs on each slide - when kids hear certain song they know it's time for that particular activity
     
  40. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    I hate icebreakers. They're the bane of professional development meetings and I've seen a whole room turn on the presenter when they're done badly.

    As high school students, my husband and I hated, hated, hated games. They were embarrassing, infantilizing, and seemed like a waste of time.

    So I never do them with my students. But I think they have a place, and part of the secret is that every teacher has his/her own persona. If you can make it fun and valuable - do it. If, like me, students would immediately know you wanted to roll your eyes - don't do it!

    I believe in playing to your strengths, and in the idea that every teacher can do things differently and that's fine.
     
  41. dovian

    dovian Comrade

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    Jul 18, 2011

    I have 11th graders. Last year I didn't even make a seating chart - it mostly worked out well. They tend to sit in the same places anyway and I learned names just as quickly as with one. Of course I threatened them that if they didn't behave I would impose one. Never had to.

    When I have 9th graders they are coming from different schools all over the city so we do have a game or two to start off with but then I do the syllabus, expectations, and get on with things. The first few days (9th or 11th) I start off with some content, but usually they will still be moving kids around for a few days if not weeks so I stick with overview type stuff, or poems. Every year I rework it though.

    Oh, and if you're going to collect info like phone #s, do it the first day while they're still being honest with you. If you wait until they get in trouble to ask for their parents' numbers, you'll be talking to their best friend's boyfriend instead.
     

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