teaching plays/drama (Diary of Anne Frank)

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by MissEducated, Oct 29, 2008.

  1. MissEducated

    MissEducated Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2008
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 29, 2008

    My eighth-grade reading class is currently studying "The Diary of Anne Frank." They are really into it, and seem to be enjoying the story, but unfortunately, there are only ten character parts in the play, and I have 22 students in my class. This leads to issues because most kids want to read, and there aren't enough parts for everyone. I have been dividing the class in half, and letting half read one day, and half the next. But I'm not sure this is the best way to keep EVERYONE engaged, and not just the students who are reading that day.

    Anyone have any ideas on effective ways to read plays as a class? Or any specific activities or graphic organizers that go well with drama? This is the longest work we have read aloud so far, and I just want to make sure that my students haven't forgotten the beginning of the play by the time we get to the end. . .
     
  2.  
  3. ChangeAgent

    ChangeAgent Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    457
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 30, 2008

    When we read R&J last year, I had my students complete a scene review sheet--list location, characters, and three major events as a summary (in bullet form).

    I switched readers for each scene, as well. This fluidity gave more students the opportunity to read (and those who struggled would not have to stress about reading too much if they got a shorter part--or those who were struggling readers but really liked a certain character could have a chance to read that part).

    Also, for characters, we made name tags (tag-board, folded hot-dog style), which were color-coded for R&J (Montagues, Capulets, Royalty, and Others). As we switched readers, the name tags went with them to provide a visual. We added illustrations and comments to these communal name tags as necessary as we read.

    Also, as we were reading drama, we played some theatre games: stretches, vocal exercises, made tableaus (I know that's the incorrect plural spelling), staged scenes. I could split the class and see how each group would stage it differently.

    Hope some of this provided something you could work with or build on.
     
  4. dovian

    dovian Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2007
    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 30, 2008

    I have done the following:

    - Give study questions/reading questions. Divide them into groups of 4 or so and have them read a scene, then answer the questions. Everybody gets to read and nobody's bored, and they're accountable because of the questions (which you can collect or not).

    - Change parts each scene, as previously suggested. If only a few are reading have something that the rest of the class needs to be looking for/taking notes on. This will probably still result in the same people reading all the time but it gets spread around a little bit.
     

Share This Page

test