Teaching Novels in Upper Elementary (4th and 5th Grade)

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Esti Hellmann, Aug 9, 2019.

  1. Esti Hellmann

    Esti Hellmann New Member

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    Aug 9, 2019

    When you assign students read a portion of a novel independently or in a group (book club or literature circles), do you provide them with a prompt to complete after reading? Can you share some sample prompts you use? Are there other after-reading activities you assign to your students to complete after independent or group-based novel reading?
     
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  3. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Aug 9, 2019

    Consider: Supply students with a list of “answers” (JEOPARDY! style) and space to write the “question” for each. For a little extra oomph! give $ values to each depending on difficulty (judgment). Students can tally their earnings on the back or a column on the side. Spin off is to have students write their own answers with questions on back of paper (key) and give each a $ value then exchange with a partner who writes questions. Can also divide answers into categories - Setting, Characters, Plot etc. - and assign $ value according to difficulty. I always used large $ values like $500,000 for easy answers and $3,000,000 for more difficult. Kids seemed to be more impressed if they could become “millionaires” as opposed to earning $50. I always allow students to use their book to find answers (questions). Since this is not a test I want everyone to be a millionaire. There’s also whole-class JEOPARDY! which is good for review before a test - another topic.
     
  4. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Cohort

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    Aug 9, 2019

    Yes, I always give some type of prompt to complete after reading. The prompts have to do with whatever skills we are focusing on at the time. At the beginning of the year, clarification is my broadest area. One example might be to go back and find a word or phrase (or more than 1) that either stumped them or could stump your average ___ grader. (Some kids never want to sound like they don't "know it all.")
    Then they need to go back and find the evidence or context clues that helped them understand the meaning of the word or phrase. Next they write a paragraph that tells what the word is and how they figured out what it meant.
    Later in the year, I hit prediction and have them predict what will happen next. They need to give their reasoning and include something they've read that helped them make the prediction.
    For inferencing, I might find a part of the book where they had to make an inference or 2. I have them go back and think about what evidence helped them make that inference.
    For something smaller like fact/opinion similes/ metaphors, I have them go back and see how many they can find in the passage or chapter and to explain why it fits in that category.

    There are a lot more fanciful and fun ways to do "after reading" activities, but I wait and do them until after the book is finished. We don't have a lot of time to waste and some kids will string them out too long. :)
     
  5. Bibliophile

    Bibliophile Companion

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    Aug 11, 2019

    In fifth I did lit circles and one of the students jobs for the week was "Discussion Director" and that student had to come up with open ended discussion questions. Another student was the "Passage Picker" and they selected a couple of passages that they thought were good to discussions and they said why they thought they were interesting and then the group discussed those passages.

    All students in lit circles had a job for the week, and each week the jobs rotated. The jobs were: discussion director, word wizard (find 6 words in the reading to define and use in sentences), Passage picker, Inference investigator (make 2 inferences about the reading that are backed with text evidence), and character sketcher (drew one or two of the characters in a way that shows what the were doing how they were feeling in the reading that week and site text evidence to support the drawing).

    We had a calendar with reading on Monday, and Tuesday, and Thursday and discussion on Wednesdays and Fridays.

    I got my roles forms and other organization, explanations and expectations forms from a bloggers website-it was free if you signed up for her emails- I'm Lovin Lit.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Aug 11, 2019

    Have you read ‘Notice and Note’? In novels, students could be finding (noticing) signposts, leading thinking deeper about what they are reading.
     
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