teaching money

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by sp.edu. teacher, Oct 2, 2002.

  1. sp.edu. teacher

    sp.edu. teacher New Member

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    Oct 2, 2002

    Does anyone have any ideas/lesson plans on the best way to teach the dollar-up method for money. I have some students who just need to know, for example, that if something costs $4.25, they need $5 to pay for it. Thanks!
     
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  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Oct 2, 2002

    Have you presented $4.25 as $4 and .25? Or $4 plus .25? You could actually even cut up a play $1 bill into 4 pieces unless that would be too confusing. You should first do equivalents and trade with them. I have 4 quarters, who has $1? Could you play Bingo and make a variation where you call out a price and they can cover one value on ther card which is greater than that price?
     
  4. sp.edu. teacher

    sp.edu. teacher New Member

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    Oct 7, 2002

    I like the bingo idea. Can you explain it further? These students are in the 7th and 8th grade and are just now understanding the concept of money. So, we are not really working on change. For functional skills (as of now-who knows what we'll try to tackle later!) I just want them to understand how many dollars they need to pay for something; hence, the teaching of the "dollar-up" method. Thanks for your ideas!!
     
  5. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Oct 7, 2002

    To play Bingo for your purpose, put dollar amounts on the chalk board and have each student place one number per box on a bingo board. You can do 3 X 3 or 4 X 4 or whatever you want. They all fill out their boards differently from one another. You then call out a price - say $7.85 for dinner at Wendy's or something. Each student can cover the $8 spot. And so on, making sure that you call one price for each whole dollar value on the chalk board. The first child to get a row or column filled is the winner. Then later on you could adapt the game for use with adding two sums, or making change, etc. I use bingo for tons of things - just played decimal bingo by calling out the word form and students had to cover the decimal form of the number. I always give candy to the winner - and if they are impatient, I let them play for second place, too. I always use a bell to start the game and my rule is if they drop the bingo chip, they can't win a prize in that game. They love it.
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Oct 7, 2002

    If your students know how to count to the whole dollar amount above the price, just have them count to the next number. For instance, if the cashier rings up $4.48, ask them what number comes after 4. They say 5. You say right, and give the cashier $5.00. Have them concentrate on the whole number, the $4, ignore the .48, and count up one to $5.00. This is a simple, successful way I teach this concept to my students. We shop at least 5 times a week and use the real experience to learn the concept. I have a web site that is all about the real life functional curriculum I teach. Give it a look and see what you think.
    Walter Gloshinski
    http://www.smiling-with-hope.org/
     
  7. sp.edu. teacher

    sp.edu. teacher New Member

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    Oct 8, 2002

    replies to Upsadaisy and Walter

    Upsadaisy-Thanks for explaining the bingo game. I will surely be using that idea. I appreciate it!! :)

    Walter-That is exactly how I've been teaching the dollar-up method. For instance: I give the students a price-let's say $3.82. Then I ask them, "What is the 1st number you heard?" They answer with "3." Then I ask, "O.K., what is one more than 3/what comes after 3, etc." Hopefully, they will say "4", and I tell them that's how much money they need, while also reminding them that they would get back some change. I made the post, because I didn't know if there was a better way of teaching it.

    I checked out your site. Awesome!! I'm inspired. I'm about to start teaching a social studies and science class to some students that are on a 1st-3rd grade level (in the 7th and 8th grade). These classes are going to be based solely on job skills/functional skills, but also need to tie into the subject area (Soc. St. and Sci.) somehow. I checked out the different curriculum ideas you teach for the bagel shop. They were very helpful. Do you know of any other websites/ideas that are based on teaching functional/life skills in a Social Studies and Science class? Thanks for all your help!!
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Oct 8, 2002

    Thanks for checking my site out. I have come to this point through years of searching for "functional curriculum" packages. I never did find any that met my students needs exactly, and the time I put into the search wasn't worth the effort. The main problem was they all were to abstract-paper and pencil, simulated, play acting, etc.. It was easier, and more rewarding for both my students and myself, to create curriculum that met their needs. The only advice I can give is to get to know the population you serve, and to do real life activities to teach them the subject area. For kids at the level you are going to teach, I would make it all real life. For science I would create some kind of daily school recycling program, school grounds maintenance, and a garden. Do you have a kitchen in your room? If so I would make things to sell to the school. Measurement, formulas(recipes), experiments(trial and error on making stuff), etc.. This also can tie into social studies- the history of buisness, etc.. I would do community orientation. This would involve bus routes-actually riding them, shopping trips-maps and schedules, field trips to everyplace that will give you a tour. You can learn the historical background of each place in your community. I would also do learning to read the newspaper-ads, movie, TV listings, weather, want ad jargon, etc. With this level student(the same as mine) you can bend the discipline to fit their needs. I can go into a lot more detail if you like. No need to reinvent the wheel. Feel free to contact me anytime. I do better on the phone than the keys. Walter
     
  9. Shea Logan

    Shea Logan Rookie

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    Oct 19, 2002

    Re: replies to Upsadaisy and Walter

    Hi Walter,

    I love you ideas! I have wrote to you once before, because I had some questions about your program. You answered all of my questions, and I appreciate it.

    If you don't mind, I have some more questions for you...:)

    Let me start off by explaining my situation. I was hired 2 years ago to teach an autistic class in a public middle school. The woman who hired me said that she wanted the class to be pre-vocational and work up to a vocational class. I am not trying to sound like a complainer, but I was not given any materials for a vocactional class. I was given mostly text books- money math, functional edmark, and spelling books. I found myself spending too much of my own money on materials to simulate a grocery store or retail store. As you may expect, the student seemed bored and were not really getting anything out of it.

    I view your class as a model classroom, and would love to use your ideas. However, I need to start out small. Can you give me any advice on where to start?

    Where do you get the money to buy all of the appliances and groceries?

    In the begiining, were all of the students motivated to start their own business? If not, how did you motivate them?

    I am sorry for all the questions....

    Thank you,

    ~Shea
     
  10. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Oct 20, 2002

    Shea: Hi, I started my program as a resource teacher, in Austin Tx, in a old home ec. room. Nothing worked, not even the clock! I remember buying a small dorm type fridge and making instant pudding. Then I got a hotplate and we made pancakes. One of my students asked me why I had flour. He told me it was used for cutting drugs. I explained it was the main ingredient in all our breads, cookies, etc... He was honestly shocked to learn this. Anyway, I also started small. I can answer all of your questions, but I prefer the phone. I am a sloooowww typist. Email me at - glosh@ap.net I can call you, or you can call me. I can help you start small, and before you know it, you will big time! Walter
     
  11. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Oct 26, 2002

    Hi Walter,

    Thank you for replying. I have ben very busy with my class and my own children. On Thursday, I was given may 9th student. She has Aspergers, and is very low when it comes to money skills. Do you have any ideas?

    I still am anxious to start a program similar to your program. Like I told you last time, I would love to start small. You mentioned that you had some ideas. I would love to talk to you and learn your ideas, however email is usually the easiest way for me. I have four children all going in different directions, and talking on the phone is never easy.

    Hope all is well,

    ~Shea
     
  12. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Oct 26, 2002

    Shea: Hi, I still would like to talk to you. It would be much more productive - time wise - than the internet. To set up some sort of business for you class will require me knowing lots of little details. Sorry that I can't do it on the internet. Like I said, I am a very slow typist, and the time I would have to put in to give all the details, would take me way too long. I have lots of ideas, so please reconsider using the phone. I am on PST and usually around evenings and weekends. I really would like to help you out. If the phone doesn't work for you, get into my website and pick out some part(s) that you think might work. Hope to hear from you. Walter glosh@ap.net
     
  13. debbieb

    debbieb Rookie

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    Nov 13, 2002

    My middle school moid students can count change in quarters
    because we run school businesses and we also do community based
    instruction. Every Wednesday we sell dill pickles for $.50 each.It
    is really popular with all of the school. They have learned how to make change for $1.oo, up to $5.00 with out assistance from me. We also go in to the community where we eat at a fast food restaurant. They know about taxes added and how much they need for a happy meal.
    I would be happy to explain more if you are interested.
    Debbie A happy sped teacher in ga.
     
  14. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Nov 22, 2002

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