Teaching Math with a PowerPoint?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.Holyoke, Mar 2, 2019.

  1. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Mar 2, 2019

    As some of you may know, I have had classroom management issues with one of my 6th grade classes all year. I attribute this to not starting out strict enough and not setting clear enough rules or expectations.

    I observed the English teacher who teaches the same kids. While it was 1st period and most behavior is better, the kids were mostly good. (The kids with behavioral issues were the same but it's easier to handle 6 misbehaving kids rather than 16).

    I liked his seating arrangement because he had groups and rows to the side. I can see this helping my classroom management in all of my classes. I have some kids who cannot sit in groups because their behavior is bad. In my difficult class, the English teacher actually had two students sit independently in a row because we have two extra desks (only 32 students instead of 34 in our other class.)

    I also noticed that he used proximity when teaching and had notes on a PowerPoint slide. I think that it was helpful that he was walking around, etc. during the lesson. (I've been using my doc cam which is to the side of the room, so I am far away from some kids and I can't see the kids in groups who face away from me.) I was thinking that I should maybe do something like this for my lessons. However, I think PowerPoints are sometimes difficult for math because I sometimes want to write down what a student might say on the board. Does anyone here use PowerPoints to teach math?

    However, it might be good for me to put one or two example problems on a PowerPoint (maybe?) for the lessons with the answers. It might help to have a wireless presenter and be walking around. I made a PowerPoint for Monday's lesson and I'm hoping it will help with the behavior so I can walk around the room and teach.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2019
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  3. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Mar 2, 2019

    I've used PowerPoint in my math classes almost every day for the past 7 years, and I couldn't live without it. I snip problems from my worksheets, as well as ink solutions on the PowerPoints, as well as use the PowerPoint to insert fun little breaks. I'll go through a few slides with them, then have a slide of them practicing. It's also great for pacing (I know I have to get to the end of this PPT by tomorrow). That said, I mostly project the PowerPoint on the board, and write over the slides with Expo marker. I don't have pre-typed solutions, unless it's just for them to check their owrk. It's a strategy that works very well for me, but I don't know anyone else in my department who uses it.
     
  4. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Phenom

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    I use a combination of PowerPoints, printed notes with fill-in-the-blanks for each student, and my Smart Board. During each lesson, I use my remote clicker to transition between slides, and work out examples using my plethora of whiteboards about the room and the Smart Board. I also have the students do whiteboard turn-and-talks and have them watch videos via embedded hyperlinks. My students say they like my teaching style and I would say it’s quite effective.
     
  5. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Mar 3, 2019

    This is a good idea! I could make PowerPoints but write over the SmartBoard. I might be able to move around the room more.
     
  6. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    Mar 3, 2019

    Power point has a way to write directly on the slide. You can even save the annotations when done. I believe if you right click and look for pointer options, you will be able to write using the pen feature.
     
  7. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    I was thinking this would be a good idea. I could be more mobile but walk up to the board to write. I think this would help. :)
     
  8. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Mar 4, 2019

    It's often tough to explain to teachers how beneficial "proximity" is in terms of suppressing goofing off. This may be due to the fact it doesn't look like any big discipline "technique" is happening. There are no charts, clips, cards or other showy attention getters - just a teacher cruising around the room. It isn't until one observes in a room where the teacher doesn't move for comparison that the benefits of proximity are realized.

    An obstacle to using proximity effectively is a projection device. Some methods teachers use to keep from being tethered to it:
    1) Choose students to write for you. Either dictate what to write or make a model in advance to copy from as you move around the room. One teacher, after the first week of school, rarely wrote or directed bell work again. Sudents did it. Bell work problems came from homework. Different students were chosen to illustrate their problems, monitor students, correct and teach solutions. The teacher walked around the room supervising, taking roll and guiding the discussion.
    2) See-Say-Do. Input a small "chunk" of information and have students do something with it. While they are "doing" walk around and check work. Then input another chunk and do, check etc. In this format students are constantly involved as is the teacher. It looks like this: input-output-input-output-input-output. This is opposite of what many teachers do when they lecture. Most lectures look like this: input-input-input-input-input-output. The teacher has little choice but to be tethered to the projection device due to the fact the teacher is doing all the work while students watch. Idea is to put the students to work while the teacher watches.
    3) White Boards. If there are several white boards choose rows (or groups) to go to the board and "show their work" as they solve a problem (or several). Rest of class does problem(s) at their desk. The teacher can stand back and, at a glance, survey student work while, at the same time, walk among the other students. Some teachers make this into a game like "baseball" or "basketball". In the "old" days classroom walls were covered with chalk boards. Often, the whole class would get up and do problems on the board. It was fun for the students and allowed the teacher to check for understanding.
     
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  9. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Mar 5, 2019

    I used the PowerPoint and behavior was excellent in my two morning classes. My challenging class was obviously not great, but they were really good compared to normal. I didn't have to stop because of talking and I mainly stood in the back of the room and watched the kids as I taught the lesson (next to one student with behavior problems today). Because I was in the back, the kids in the back were excellent as were several of the kids who usually talk the whole time. :) The kids in the front however weren't too great haha. I would have circulated to the front more but I wanted to stand near one student.

    I also switched desk arrangements and I had some kids in rows and some in groups which helped.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2019
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  10. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Mar 6, 2019

    Omg...my kids were so good today. They were reviewing in groups and I set it up like a competition. It was really just a worksheet but there was almost no yelling, almost all kids were working, etc.

    I think that the proximity has helped because I give directions from the middle or back of the room. I’m hoping that the improved behavior reflects on their quiz grades tomorrow!
     
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  11. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Groupie

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    Mar 6, 2019

    Teaching math with a PowerPoint is very doable. Along with a SmartBoard, it's easier to roam the room having pre-written notes already projected on the screen. During my rookie year of teaching, I didn't have PP presentations and turned my back to 8th grade kids very often. Let's just say it was a trying year. Powerpoints helped my 2nd and 3rd years. The last 3 years, I haven't had the luxury of a smartboard or PP presentations but I do have a doc camera in the front. Earlier this year, I had it to the side but it didn't feel right.
     

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