Teaching Linear Functions

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Ms.Holyoke, Dec 8, 2017.

  1. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Dec 8, 2017

    Does anyone have any resources for teaching linear functions in 8th grade? If you do and would be willing to share, that would be great. :)
     
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  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    What kinds of resources are you looking for?
     
  4. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    If anyone has taught it before and has handouts or activities that would be great. Or just general advice about teaching this topic would be helpful as well.
     
  5. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I'm teaching it now, but it's one-on-one since I am a tutor so that makes a big difference. I'm really just using the text. Sorry. But, I can imagine that it would be really difficult for a class with students of varying needs and abilities. My student just needs lots and lots of repetition and she is limited to three hours of instruction in the subject a week.
    Actually, I just glanced at this website and it seems like a good place to get notes for handouts:
    http://virtualnerd.com/algebra-2/li...ns/parent-functions/what-is-a-linear-function .
     
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  6. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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  7. rpan

    rpan Cohort

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    There is a PBL activity that may be relevant to you since group work is a priority for your student teaching course. It encompasses linear equations and graphing but I think you could adapt it because the relationship between number of rubber bands and distance is somewhat linear. It’s on the teaching channel website and the activity is called bungee barbie
     
  8. JimG

    JimG Comrade

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    Don’t try to clump graphing linear equations and writing linear equations together; break it up as two mini-units with graphing first.

    For graphing, stick with slope-intercept form. Don’t bother with x-and-y intercepts from standard form. Convert every equation to slope-intercept form before graphing.

    For writing linear equations, regardless of which form you want it to end up in, stick with point-slope form as the starting point and then convert if necessary. The exception is the trivial case where a problem blatantly gives the slope and y-intercept.

    For writing linear equations, plan three different lessons for slope formula, point-slope form when given a point and a slope, and point-slope form when given two points. My freshmen have had difficulty when trying to lump two or more of those together.
     
  9. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    ^
    My students are in 8th grade so I think we are only looking at slope-intercept form.
     
  10. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    I will take a look; thank you!
     
  11. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Thank you! We don't have a textbook and my mentor doesn't like our curriculum so I do feel Iike I'm starting from scratch.
     
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  12. beccmo

    beccmo Comrade

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    As a physics teacher we graph a lot. (Slopes in science are in decimal form, with units, - our math department uses fraction only). Ask your science teacher if they graph in their class and you can brainstorm together.

    The rubber band idea is good. You could place a rubber band on a hook, add some masses to it and measure the amount of stretch. Students could graph mass vs. stretch and see a relationship. Do different types of rubber bands so all groups will have different results.
     
  13. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    ^
    My mentor is also the science teacher so I'm wondering if I can ask her if they can do the barbie bungee activity in science and analyze the graph in math.
     
  14. rpan

    rpan Cohort

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    I am a Science teacher and I wrote a STEM assessment based on the Barbie Bungee project to run over 3 weeks (i only see my students 4 hours a week) and using the Engineering Design Process and students work in groups. The Science component is on energy transfers and transformations and the Maths component is graphing linear graphs based on the data collected and drawing "line of best fit".

    Students can be extended by asking them to extrapolate the "line of best fit" and seeing if the data gained from the extrapolated graph will match real life data collected.
     
  15. Genesiser

    Genesiser Rookie

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    I had my students go out to the track and we calculated how fast we could all run by running/jogging 100 meter dash and found our average speed.

    From there we used our average speed as our slope and assumed that was the speed we ran from start to finish.

    With the Y - Intercept, I had them think of having a head start, or starting a few feet ahead of the other people before a race began, or zero time had passed. Basically, the X was time in seconds, and Y was distance from the start.

    This was the first year I tried it and it seemed to give them a strong foundation for linear equations.
     

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