Teaching Jobs

Discussion in 'General Education' started by donziejo, Dec 18, 2011.

  1. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    Dec 18, 2011

    I know a lot of teachers are looking for jobs. From reading the threads, I understand that teaching jobs are hard to come by on the West and East coast. It seems that teaching jobs in parts of the country ( California, New Jersey, New York) have been hard to come by for a long time. Am I correct about that? I know of job openings in several states. I'm just wondering about the rest of the country. There are/will be jobs in Nebraska, Utah, Mississippi, Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, and Alaska. Can anyone tell me where they know teaching jobs are/will be. What about your state? I hate to see so many frustrated teachers trying to land there first job. Maybe some of you can relocate and gain experience in another state. 3 years of experience helps a lot.
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 18, 2011

    I'm 53 years old.

    I remember as a teenager, my uncle had countless conversations with my older cousin, warning her NOT to go into teaching because there were no jobs. That was ballpark early 1970s.

    Metro NYC has always been brutally competitive. It's no secret to anyone around here who has been paying attention.
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Dec 18, 2011

    There are still jobs to find, but they are definitely more difficult to come by. I know that my district hired quite a bit of teachers this year but we also had way more applications than in the past.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 18, 2011

    NJ is a tough market. That said, we hire two or three teachers a year in my district due to retirements....the hires come from literally hundreds of resumes.
     
  6. Math

    Math Cohort

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    Dec 18, 2011

    I know jobs are in NJ maybe try sites like this....
    k12jobspot.com/
     
  7. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    Dec 18, 2011

    I know of a Language/Arts teacher in Utah that is leaving at the end of this year. Last week I attended a meeting and 14 new teachers (all first year) attended. So, there are job openings in some parts of the country. I've wondered about other Southern states or the midwest. What about Kansas, Oklahoma???? Wyoming? So far it sounds like Metro NYC might just be one of the hardest places to get a job. But others are posting that there are job openings. That's good news:)
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 18, 2011

    Of course there are jobs, it's just tight with hundreds of resumes for every one opening. In that kind of market, districts can be extremely choosy. NJ has historically been a competitive market. Current conditions make it even more so.
     
  9. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    Dec 18, 2011

    I think from reading the boards that certain states are much more competitive than other states. I know 4 years ago in Utah the middle school I worked hired 4 or 5 teachers from Ohio. It wasn't that the teachers wanted to relocate they just needed a job. One of them was a married male teacher and he rented a room with another teacher. His family was able to join him last year.

    Also, I'm not suggesting that it's possible for everyone to move to rural Nebraska, Mississippi, Utah etc.... just suggesting that there is an option for some people other than subbing or giving up teaching altogether. And some places need good teachers...the children do to!!!!
     
  10. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

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    Dec 18, 2011

    I looked last week and Denver Public Schools had something like 90 openings. I don't know how current the listing is, but it was on the DPS website.
    I'm in AZ and I've never known a teacher here to not get hired after graduation.
     
  11. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Dec 18, 2011

    I don't personally know any certified teachers looking for a position. I applied to a couple of districts...three, I think...and I wasn't too concerned about not obtaining a full time classroom position. I've read here of people applying to just about every district in a state and then some! We are just not in the same situation. To my knowledge, all of my Middle Grades Education classmates found a position their first year.

    --Kentucky
     
  12. Math

    Math Cohort

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    I know... I'm just trying to lend a helping hand.
     
  13. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    Dec 18, 2011

    I think there is an oversupply problem all over. Utah is a better market, yes. But graduates of Utah State - previously employed almost instantly upon graduation - are finding it much harder to transition to the classroom these days.

    We are hiring this year, and have received a solid number of applications. But it's nothing like the thousands of apps people were talking about on this board last spring.
     
  14. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Dec 19, 2011

    "Thousands" would be the norm on Long Island for elementary, secondary English or Social Studies or Phys Ed.

    From my home in Nassau County, in 20 minutes I can get to at least 3 universities and a college that all have teacher education programs. (So that's not counting the local community college or the schools in NYC-- there are at least a dozen-- or the schools a bit further away in Suffolk. These are places I could ride a bicycle to if I had the time.) FOUR!!!! So this spring, thousands of new teachers will graduate from those schools and others, hoping to find teaching jobs. I hope they've been paying attention-- they'll have to have amazing cover letters and resumes, sharp interview skills, and persistance to get those coveted jobs.

    Anyway, I appreciate what the OP is doing-- trying to find the pockets in the country where the competition is less stiff.
     
  15. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    Dec 19, 2011

    Alice, I think the metro area situation applies in a lot of places with a density of universities (like NY/NJ). And I think Donziejo is right that the most desirable places to live are pretty tight, too. What I hear about Boston, DC, Chicago, SF and LA are all the same as what you report.

    I love it here, and am perennially surprised that more people haven't come to take advantage of 6.5% unemployment and a gorgeous natural environment.
     
  16. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Dec 19, 2011

    I haven't looked for a (special ed) teaching job since about 2007/08. It was kind of tough finding them in the tiny radius where I wanted to work. Yes, I'm picky about location & how far I'm willing to drive.

    I know people do it all the time, but I personally would never move out of state for a job. I don't have to, especially since I'm not technically in the teaching field anymore even though I still work for a district.
     
  17. Enseignante<3

    Enseignante<3 Companion

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    I'm in the Philly area and jobs are tight here. It's mostly a supply and demand issue though. There are SO many applicants for every job opening, and twice a year even more graduates are added to to that pool. Being in an area FULL of colleges and universities doesn't help. I went to a university that is known for its education program, so literally 3/4 of my graduating class were ed majors.

    It's tough here and a lot of places. It's the type of area where you really need to know people - get a foot in the door and work your way to a job. Most districts around me only really hire contracted jobs from long-term subs and long-term subs from per diem subs that have really shined.
     
  18. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Oklahoma is flooded with teachers looking for jobs. Our economy hasn't been hit as hard as some of you, but we just haven't been hiring. Schools are tightening their belts and not hiring positions. And our new state supt. is not helping matters.
     
  19. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I relocated from Ohio to find a job. It was downright impossible to find anything there. I thought I'd have a better chance being in special Ed but there were thousands applying for those jobs too unless you were interested in doing severe ebd classrooms. I applied to every district in the entire state, literally. I think it's a combination of there being so many colleges, so many budget cuts, and the fact that it seems most people in ohio want to stay in Ohio. The job market is wonderful here in Colorado. My mom used to be all about trying to get me back home, but she lost her job last year and once she started looking she realized how dismal the situation in oh really is. She even advised me not to look in oh because even if I got a job I would most likely not be able to keep it with all the rifs happening.
     
  20. McKennaL

    McKennaL Groupie

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    Dec 20, 2011

    Chicagoland area... only but the select few...fagettaboutit!
     
  21. isabunny

    isabunny Comrade

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    Dec 20, 2011

    I have been looking for a teaching job in Georgia for 2 1/2 years now. Found a preschool job last year that didn't work out very well. I am certified in P-12 & ESOL. In Georiga the districts have been eliminating teaching positions every year by increasing class sizes and closing whole schools. Jobs are listed on the districts websites and teachgeorgia.org, but after appling for 100 jobs I have yet to recieve an interview. It's discouraging and I have went back to college to try another field.
     
  22. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I was thinking about this one and wanted to add that I've also heard Nevada, North Carolina, and South Carolina have been looking for teachers in the past. I've also heard more recently though that both NC and SC have become so flooded with teachers (due to hearing that it was one of the only places with a good market) that it's not even true anymore and those are now some of the more competitive places. One of the girls from my college program got a special ed. job fairly easily in NC, but it was in a rural area and she had something like 35 kids on her caseload. She was miserable- luckily for her she got a job in VA this school year. Florida is one of the places I'm looking in (the license was so easy to apply for!) because I would love, love, love to live there but I've heard very bad things about the school systems :(. Being so far away now, it's hard to really know what's a good district and what's not since you don't hear anything by word of mouth. You can look up the schools online, but then you're basically just finding test scores.

    Kat- The word around here is that DPS will "take any warm body." They do always seem to have a lot of openings. Last year around thanksgiving I actually ended up sitting next to their special ed director on a plane. She was from my hometown area and happened to be wearing a sweatshirt from my rival hs, so we got to talking. She was practically begging me to come work in thier system!

    I think there are places that are hiring, one just needs to be willing to move and possibly live in a less desirable location for awhile. I realize that's not something everyone wants to do- but if you're desperate to break into the teaching field it can be a great way to get in. I'm ready to move and I knew going in the area I moved to wasn't somewhere I wanted to stay permantly, but I don't regret starting my career there at all. I'd make the same decision if I could go back! This was a great idea for a thread!
     
  23. KatherineParr

    KatherineParr Comrade

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    I think it's also reasonable to consider the quality of teacher training in any particular area. Here, there are a number of fine schools, but nothing like the density of colleges and universities in NY/NJ.

    The same is true in NC/SC.

    So one thing about the density of applicants is that it's so uneven. If younger graduates move for a job, that might help. But even then, I think education has just produced too many teachers. And (like my field - history) they produced a group that clusters in certain areas. Tons of elementary ed, tons of humanities, not enough in areas like STEM.

    In history, there's been a lot of talk about establishing national guidelines for PhDs so we stop producing 1000 PhDs for 700 jobs annually. For the last 20 years, that's been the imbalance. You can see where it would lead.

    But no one really wants a national oversight entity. So we just keep producing way, way too many Americanists and Europeanists despite the fact that they end up unemployed.

    The same thing seems to be happening in education, but again with little outside intervention. The reasons to resist central planning make sense to me, but the results are sad.
     
  24. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Dec 20, 2011

    I am in NY and there are very few teaching jobs to be found. I just got a new job in a private school (special education school) because they happened to get money from the state and were able to expand and add classrooms. You might want to look into private schools if you can't find any job openings in public schools.
     
  25. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Dec 20, 2011

    In 2006, which was my first year teaching, I was one of more than 3,000 new teachers in the biggest school district in Nevada. This year, I think they hired around 200 teachers. Although the school district is hiring fewer teachers at a much lower rate, it is still hiring. My own school has at least half a dozen long term subs because we never got any applicants for those positions. I think that people have heard that Nevada (specifically, Las Vegas) isn't what it used to be, so they're not bothering to submit applications. It's too bad, though, because we do still have jobs.

    I'm not going to lie....Things in the district aren't great. We're working without a contract right now and there are all sorts of rumblings about what might or might not happen once a contract is finally agreed upon. Class sizes are large, the pay isn't great, we don't have many resources, and in some schools there isn't a lot of admin support. I love my kids, though, so that makes it worth it.

    PM me for more information.
     

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