Teaching in Texas?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Geologygirl, Nov 20, 2009.

  1. Geologygirl

    Geologygirl Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    Messages:
    444
    Likes Received:
    59

    Nov 20, 2009

    :help:
    I was curious what the job prospects were for someone who wanted to teach 4-8 science in Texas? I would be willing to relocate anywhere.

    I am currently in California but have realized with the recent news that the state would have a 20 billion dollar deficit each year for the next five years that this is not the best place to stay if I want to become a teacher. I also was raised in Texas, and have my family in Texas which is why I choose that state.


    I would have to go through a credentialing program once I moved to Texas. I already have a B.S. in Geology so I would have to go through a PB program or an alternative program. Will this make me less competitive than someone with an education degree?
    Are some programs better then others? I would prefer to go through a universities PB program so any units I earn could later be applied towards a master’s degree.

    I was also curios about high school level Environmental Science. I noticed that teachers don't seem to need an Environmental Science credential to teach this class. Since it is so similar to geology, which credential you would need to have in order to teach it (Life Science 8-12, physical science 8-12 or chemistry 8-12)?

    And lastly, I was curious what teaching science was like with the new standards stating that you have to teach weakness and strengths of multiple theories. I can see good and bad ways that that statement might be applied and I was curios how, if at all, it has effected teaching science to kids within the state.

    :thanks:
     
  2.  
  3. darlibby

    darlibby Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 20, 2009

    I live in Texas, and yes, going through an alternative certification program does make you a bit less marketable. But you only need one year on probation, then you have the same teaching certificate as everyone else. I don't know anything about science tests, but there is more of a need for science teachers in high school than in middle school. Good luck!
     
  4. Geologygirl

    Geologygirl Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    Messages:
    444
    Likes Received:
    59

    Nov 20, 2009

    Darlibby,
    Does going through a PB program rather then a alternative program make any difference to the type of certificate you get at the end? Is it the same thing?
     
  5. darlibby

    darlibby Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 21, 2009

    What is a PB program?
     
  6. Geologygirl

    Geologygirl Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    Messages:
    444
    Likes Received:
    59

    Nov 21, 2009

    post bachlarette? The Texas Teacher state site differentiates them from alternative programs, but does not explain how they differ.
     
  7. darlibby

    darlibby Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 21, 2009

    In the end, it's the same standard certificate. Some programs do let you do 12 weeks of student teaching, which means you get a standard certificate immediately after student teaching. Without student teaching, you have a probationary certificate for a year, then standard.
     
  8. txteach13

    txteach13 Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 21, 2009

    As soon as I signed up for an alternative cert program ($500), they looked at my college transcript and decided what certificate I could test for. They gave me a letter addressed to school districts that said I was in the program and would be getting a probationary cert. Being in the program allowed me to take the content exam (take the computer version and get the results in 48 hrs). With the exam passed and that letter, I was able to apply to school districts and they didn't seem to be too concerned that I was ACP. In the program we went to a few friday, saturday trainings and an online book study but that was it. Once I got a job, the program assigned someone to check on me once a month and we had more meetings. When the year was over, the principal had to approve my certificate along with the program and then it was changed to standard which is the same standard for everyone. Once you have a standard cert, you can take the content test for any subject or grade. As far as locations I'm in the very southern part and we've been hit by some budget cuts and hiring freezes but like a previous poster,
    but high school science and math teachers are in demand.
     
  9. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2007
    Messages:
    17,362
    Likes Received:
    46

    Nov 21, 2009

    Geo~I think with a PB program you would be closer to earning a masters degree because you take classes for your certification. I think this is what my sister did. An alternative certification program has a 10-12 week course in the summer, you teach starting in the fall (if you can find a position) w/ a prob cert, and receive a standard once you have successfully completed a year of teaching. My sister had no trouble finding a position and now has her masters in education. I work with a first year teacher who went alt cert. She was already working in the district as an aide and was able to step into the position when the teacher suddenly left last year.
     
  10. Geologygirl

    Geologygirl Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    Messages:
    444
    Likes Received:
    59

    Nov 22, 2009

    I appreciate all of your answers and explanations about teaching shortage areas, and what the differences are between the alternative and PB programs. It seems like every state has a different series of hoops which a teaching candidate is required to jump though that it gets hard trying to sort them all out.

    I have also noticed that a few tests are required to be taken to become a teacher in Texas. Besides the new TASP test, there seem to be two or more tests one needs to complete to be a teacher?
    For some of the schools I have looked at, it looks like you need to get permission to take some of these tests but they are needed before you begin a program. Which test is this and why do I need to get permission first to take them, and when should I be taking them if I want to apply for the summer semester? This will effect the date at which I make the big move cross country.
    In California, the tests you need are the CBEST and the CSET in your subject. Both tests are tests which you take in your own time and money before even thinking of applying to any credential program. I feel a little lost trying to figure out how the Texas system differs.
     
  11. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2007
    Messages:
    17,362
    Likes Received:
    46

    Nov 22, 2009

    In order to get your certification, you'll need to take the content test for the grade levels you want to teach plus the Professional responsbilities test for those grades.
     
  12. wrice

    wrice Habitué

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2009
    Messages:
    758
    Likes Received:
    1

    Nov 23, 2009


    ...and you'll need a sign-off from a teacher certification program in order to take both. So you cannot take those tests until you've gone through some certification training. You can often find out more information about alternative certification from larger school district websites or the Tx Educational Service Center (Region 4 for Houston) that services the area you are interested in.

    I'd suggest against the Master's route and stick with the alternative certification program. Cheaper, faster, and you're in a cohort with a bunch of teachers exploring the same real-world problems together.

    Science is in demand. If you're bilingual Spanish, you're gold.
     
  13. Geologygirl

    Geologygirl Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    Messages:
    444
    Likes Received:
    59

    Nov 23, 2009

    Thank you smalltowngirl and wrice for your responses. The testing makes a little more sense now. As for the type of certification pathway I want to take, I think I want to go with a PB program. It takes the same amount of time as the accelerated program and the units you receive are from an accredited university. I image if I ever have to relocate to another state for a job the other state would be more likely to accept accreditation through a university than another type of program.

    I also do want to eventually get a Masters degree or even a PhD in Science Education, or outdoor science education, but I want to teach for awhile before deciding which one would be best to pursue.
     
  14. tinyunicorn

    tinyunicorn Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2009
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0

    Nov 28, 2009

    Transition to Teaching is your answer!

    Please look into a program called Transition to Teaching. It is a government grant aimed to fill the need for secondary (4-8 and 8-12) math and science teachers by recruiting former math and science professionals to become teachers!

    They pay for you to get certified, for half of a master's degree in your certification area and so much more! When I was working toward my M.Ed. in early childhood ed I worked as a graduate assistant for one of these programs and they even gave away 10,000 dollar scholarships at the drop of a hat!

    Good luck!
     
  15. Geologygirl

    Geologygirl Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    Messages:
    444
    Likes Received:
    59

    Nov 28, 2009

    Thank you for the information tinyunicorn. I will definitly look into the program that you have mentioned. It sounds great!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 276 (members: 0, guests: 260, robots: 16)
test