Teaching in North Carolina

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by MrD, May 20, 2020 at 12:36 PM.

  1. MrD

    MrD Rookie

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    May 20, 2020 at 12:36 PM

    Hi everyone,

    My wife and I were teachers in Florida. We found that there were a lot of children with IEPs and behavior plans in our classes and we never got much support from the state when they needed it. Our friends up out of state also get paid better.

    We haven't taught out of state before, but is teaching in North Carolina any different? From what we've found, there seems to be smaller school districts, private christian schools, and even Teacher Assistant positions here. Does anyone know if it's better in NC or pretty much the same everywhere.

    We appreciate you sharing your experiences with us. Thank you!
     
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  3. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    May 20, 2020 at 12:56 PM

    I haven't heard anything good about teaching in NC but I"m sure others can chime in!
     
  4. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    May 20, 2020 at 1:12 PM

    I have only ever heard bad things about teaching in NC. But truthfully, what you described is the norm in public schools everywhere. I’m not sure you can escape IEPs, behavior problems, or relatively low pay in any state, unless you go to a private school or find some gem of a school somewhere.
     
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  5. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    May 20, 2020 at 2:06 PM

    I think I remember hearing things about NC schools not having unions, lower than average pay except in certain areas, not treating teachers fairly (maybe because there are no unions)??
     
  6. MrD

    MrD Rookie

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    May 20, 2020 at 2:37 PM

    I see that teachers unions are illegal here? So what do you do if your falsely accused by a parent and need the union to support your case against the state. In Florida we get a union rep and even access to lawyers. Are teachers just thrown under the buss

    Thank you any NC teachers who can answer.
     
  7. MrD

    MrD Rookie

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    May 20, 2020 at 2:39 PM

    Local Christian Schools there won’t give much pay but I would hope that the students are more respectful and behaved coming from a different environment than the public schools.
     
  8. MrD

    MrD Rookie

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    May 20, 2020 at 2:42 PM

    IE - A friends’ Student in Florida put on XXXtentacion (Rapper) with his friends then cursed out the sub. Sent to principal and came back with a coloring page...eight year old student doing this. In other words most Intermediate kids act like mini high schoolers now.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2020 at 2:49 PM
  9. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    May 20, 2020 at 9:29 PM

    I can’t imagine a scenario where I would voluntarily teach in NC. My in-laws are from there and we considered moving there for a while, until we did our research and learned just how poorly the teachers there are treated.
     
  10. RainStorm

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    May 20, 2020 at 10:47 PM

    I have taught in NC. I have taught in Florida. The pay in NC is terrible, but it is a tiny bit (and I do mean tiny bit) better than Florida.

    There are no unions in NC -- they are against the law. So you won't find the duty-free lunches and other protections that you find in Florida. Some districts have better options than others. Some work with the "associations" (that's what they call the NEA and such in states that prohibit unions.) Many school districts don't.

    NC is very different from other states in one way. They have a state-wide pay scale. Public schools in NC do not set their own pay scales, like they do in other states. Every public school teacher in NC makes the exact same amount, regardless of the district. They do, however, offer "supplements" to districts in very expensive areas -- so while your pay in an expensive city will exactly the same as in a low-cost-of-living rural area, in the expensive city, teachers may get an extra supplement that is paid for by the locality. You can see the state pay scale at https://files.nc.gov/dpi/documents/fbs/finance/salary/schedules/2019-20schedules.pdf

    For example, a new teacher with a bachelors in NC will make $35,000. A teacher with a bachelor's with 10 years of experience will make $45,000. A teacher with a master's and 10 years of experience will receive $49,500. Some of the more expensive cities offer extra services to their teachers -- such as assistance with finding apartments and homes, and gym memberships. They do this to attract more teachers, because they can't increase the pay.

    The other thing that is very different in North Carolina is that you don't apply directly to school districts for public school jobs. You have to apply to the state website, and then you choose which school districts (and specific job openings) where you want your application sent. You do that at: https://nc.teachermatch.org/signin.do

    I don't know if this has changed, but it used to be that you couldn't apply on the NC state website unless you already have your NC teacher's license. You have to input your teacher license ID number, and it will not allow you to complete the application without it. They don't do the "license pending" or "license applied for" thing, so make sure you get your NC license right away. I know that in Florida, you can apply for teaching jobs with your license pending or license applied for, but you can't do that in North Carolina (or at leaset you couldn't last time I applied.)
     
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  11. RainStorm

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    May 20, 2020 at 10:52 PM

    Oh, I forgot to say -- they don't offer tenure in NC anymore. So no job protection for you...
     
  12. ready2learn

    ready2learn Comrade

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    May 20, 2020 at 10:55 PM

    I am not a NC teacher, but teach in South Carolina right across the border. I think the answer I am going to give is similar in both states, but I can't say I am sure. In SC, we have teacher associations, that you can join for the liability insurance. The union is very weak. It doesn't have ability of collective bargaining. Membership isn't required and I would guess that at most, 10% of my coworkers are a member of one of the associations. I am a member because of the liability insurance, and also because I believe it is important to be a member of a professional organization.

    My understanding is that conditions are not as poor in NC as they were 5 years ago, but I could certainly be wrong about that. Saying that, there are several very highly rated schools in NC near where I live, but I wouldn't want to move to North Carolina.
     
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  13. TeacherNY

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    May 21, 2020 at 7:15 AM

    The only people I know who live in NC are people who retired and moved down there. Are there just too many retired people that are not invested in education and they don't bother to make the schools and teachers a priority? Maybe Florida too?
     
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  14. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    May 22, 2020 at 3:08 AM

    I have only heard bad things. I graduated into a horrific job market in 2010. At the time it was a popular idea to go teach in NC because it was one of the few places where it was somewhat plausible for a new grad to get a job (at the time, schools in my home state were getting 5,000+ applicants for a single position). I had a couple of college friends who ended up going there. One of them had a 3rd grade class with 42 students in it. I honestly can't imagine how that's even legal. I'm sure it's against fire code in my building. Another was a sped teacher with almost 70 students on her caseload. Needless to say, they didn't last long there. One was able to get a job in VA her 3rd year and the other was able to go back to our home state by taking a job with students with severe/profound disabilities. I also seem to remember some drama a few years back with the state saying they weren't going to give higher pay for MA degrees. I'm not sure if that's been resolved or not.
     
  15. MrD

    MrD Rookie

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    May 22, 2020 at 1:06 PM

    That is insane. It is mentally impossible for one adult to monitor and effectively teach 42 students at once. I had 42 my first year but it was a split class and that was difficult as it is. No pay for MA degrees is also crazy. Other professionals get paid more, teachers need to fall under that same umbrella was well.
     
  16. RainStorm

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    May 22, 2020 at 4:16 PM

    When I moved from VA to NC, I had to take an $8,000 pay cut. That was tough. NC has a statewide pay scale, so there is no way around that.

    Ten years later, when I moved from NC to FL, I had to take a $3,000 pay cut from NC (they don't pay for full years of experience in FL anymore, and they only offer a pittance for a Master's here.) That was tough.

    If I had been able to stay in VA for my entire career (18 years) I'd now be making $20,000 more per year!

    The cost of living is actually so much higher here in FL. And elementary teachers in FL are now required to gain both their Reading Specialist certification and their ESOL certification within their first 5 years, or they can't recertify. Both of those certifications require 5 classes (in my case, 5 graduate classes.) Even if the district pays for it, that still means I would have to take TEN graduate courses in a five year period, while teaching full time. That is a huge burden on a teacher. (And not all districts will pay for it.)

    I have the exact same education level (I came to teaching with a Master's) so gaining education over the years wasn't the reason for different pays. The cost of living between VA and NC was only slightly different, so that doesn't really account for it. The cost of living in FL is so much higher than NC (the same "amount" of house here cost me almost twice as much!)

    Now imagine I had worked any of my 18 years in a union-state (VA and NC are not union.)

    I wish I could have been able to move to a better-paying state, but we don't always have the luxury to pick-up and move.
     
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  17. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    May 22, 2020 at 4:27 PM

    :yeahthat:

    When my son started teaching, it was one of the states I refused to let him apply to.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2020 at 4:41 PM
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