Teaching in North Carolina?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Daveblax, Nov 4, 2014.

  1. Daveblax

    Daveblax Rookie

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    Nov 4, 2014

    I am considering moving from NY to North Carolina because there aren't any jobs here. Even though the salary is less for NC teachers, does the cheaper cost of living make up for it?

    Can any teachers in North Carolina tell me about their experiences? If I did find a job in NY, I know it would probably be in one of the toughest neighborhoods. What kind of support do teachers receive in North Carolina?

    I have been considering teaching Texas as well, but I am having a hard time finding the best website for open teaching jobs in TX.

    What other states do people recommend? My wife and I are open to moving to any state where I can find a good job.
     
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  3. heatherberm

    heatherberm Cohort

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    Nov 4, 2014

    I can't really answer your questions about North Carolina, but I'm also in NY and I've had a few friends move to the Northern VA area for teaching jobs. The biggest complaint seems to be that the area is expensive, but they have jobs. I also have a couple of friends who have relocated to Florida and so far at least, they're happy.

    We're starting to have the relocation talk here too and no state really seems perfect, but NC, VA, FL, NV, AZ and TX are the ones that seem to pop up the most as far as needing teachers goes.
     
  4. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Dave~TX is divided into regional service centers. Is there a particular area that you're considering? That would help narrow down the sites.
     
  5. ktmiller222

    ktmiller222 Cohort

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    Nov 4, 2014

    I taught in NC before moving back to PA (even though I know it's impossible to get a job here). I worked for Wake County Public Schools (largest county down there). I loved my time in NC. Sure, the pay is less but I thought the living cost was reasonable (and the housing/apts are more updated then places up here in the North). There is no teacher union in NC but to be honest we never had any problems! People are super friendly and I found them very helpful as I was moving down there! I taught there '08 and at the time there was a program for teachers that helped them with relocation fees (I was not aware of this when I was moving so I didn't get help) so you might want to check to see if they still have it! Good luck!
     
  6. ktmiller222

    ktmiller222 Cohort

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  7. AdamnJakesMommy

    AdamnJakesMommy Habitué

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    Nov 4, 2014

    I live and teach in NC, specifically in eastern North Carolina. To answer your question, it truly depends on "where" in NC you want to live/teach. The pay is consistent across the state, but there are definitely areas where the COL is higher than others. Here in coastal areas (with the exception of the beach areas) the COL is pretty good and you would be able to support yourself on your income. A previous poster mentioned Wake County, and there would be a plethora of job opportunities there because of its size, but the piedmont does tend to have a higher cost of living than the tidewater region where I live. I am not familiar with the mountain area at all.

    I went to undergrad at UNC Greensboro and I can tell you that Guilford County (the county Greensboro is in) has great job prospects and the COL is cheaper than Raleigh area.

    Another county with lots of job prospects and relatively low cost of living would be Cumberland County (Fayetteville).

    Other counties with good job prospects and a lower cost of living would be Onslow County and Pitt County (Jacksonville and Greenville respectively) in the east.

    The other great thing about NC is that it is HEAVILY populated so there are lots of smaller towns surrounding the larger towns/cities, so even in Wake County (Raleigh) you might be able to find affordable living in a smaller town within a reasonable commute (such as Garner or Clayton).

    One area to avoid--Chapel Hill. Beautiful city, VERY high cost of living. That would not be sustainable on a teacher's salary.
     
  8. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Nov 4, 2014

    I enjoyed my time living and teaching in North Carolina. I lived/taught there for 6 years before moving back to my home state.
    I happened to live in a very wealthy area, so it was difficult for me to survive on a teacher's salary. If I had stayed renting, I probably would have been fine. But I purchased a house. My rent was the same as the mortgage, but then I had repairs. The repairs went on a credit card and my budget was maxed with the house. That meant I had to get a part time job. I worked nights and weekends, 25-30 hours per week.

    Teaching in North Carolina comes with more duties and less planning time that you see in union states. I got used to it and it wasn't a big deal.

    I moved back to Michigan in 2013. My new job, which gave me partial credit for years taught, came with a $10,000 raise. By the time I paid for union dues and health insurance, I bring home about $1,500 more a year. If that. :dizzy: While NC pays low, health insurance is fully covered for the employee. A lot of people don't factor that into the low salary.

    I'm always more that willing to answer any questions. If they are things you don't want public, feel free to PM me.
     
  9. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    This is my second year teaching in NC but I was born and raised in the state. I don't have a problem living off my salary. I know it's way lower than other states and sure, I'd love to get paid more, but I do just fine on my lowest tier possible salary level. But I don't have kids or a house payment. My car is paid off and my phone bill is low. I live a fairly frugal life (with the exception of a few major vacations every year) so my salary does me just fine.

    Your options for jobs depend on what you teach. I teach science and I was offered a job at the interview the week before school started. I looked up jobs in a neighboring county today and there are probably five other jobs I could apply for right now in the middle of the school year. Jobs abound for secondary science. Secondary social studies- not so much.
     
  10. Daveblax

    Daveblax Rookie

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    Thanks for answering my post. I am considering moving to NC with my wife because I want to buy a house within the next 3 years. In what areas in NC would I get the best value for a home?

    Also, would the health insurance plan cover my wife's health insurance in North Carolina?

    I will be certified in Special Education (1-6) and Childhood Education (1-6). My first choice would be to teach a general education class. What are the job prospects for elementary school teachers compared to other types of teachers?

    Also, I am currently student teaching, and most likely will get my New York certification in January. Should I start applying to NC schools now, or should I wait a few months?
     
  11. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    You can add your wife to your health insurance, but you pay a premium.

    What type of NC are you wanting- rural, urban, suburban? Mountains, Piedmont(middle), coastal? You can find inexpensive places to live anywhere. I lived in one of the most expensive areas, but 30 minutes away was much more affordable.

    With teachers leaving the state in droves, it probably won't be that difficult to get a general ed job. You should have no problem getting special ed.

    I would wait until you are certified to apply. If there are postings, they want a person now. Hiring usually doesn't happen until June or July, even August, for the following year. The state doesn't finalize the budget until July (which finalized the teacher allotment.) They try to predict, but it can change until the state's budget is finalized.
     
  12. cafekarma

    cafekarma Rookie

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    I live in Chapel Hill off a teacher's salary. With the added salary supplements in my district, my pay isn't too far off from what I would earn in neighboring states. Also, it's lovely here. That's got to count for something. My school has a couple of positions which have still not been filled, so I would say that the prospects for elementary teachers in the triangle area are pretty good if you are willing to work in a Title 1 school.
     
  13. AdamnJakesMommy

    AdamnJakesMommy Habitué

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    Nov 6, 2014

    I didnt think of supplements! Great point!
     

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