Teaching in a Hospital Setting

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Rebecca1122, Nov 4, 2014.

  1. Rebecca1122

    Rebecca1122 Comrade

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    Nov 4, 2014

    Has anyone ever taught in a hospital setting? What was your experience? Pros/cons? It is an option I am considering. Any insight on this type (or another non-traditional teaching setting) is appreciated!
     
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  3. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Nov 4, 2014

    not sure what you mean.

    In my area we have "teachers" that carry materials back and forth to the hospital and home-bound students. They're basically couriers. They do not have the ability to actually teach these students.
     
  4. Rebecca1122

    Rebecca1122 Comrade

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    Nov 4, 2014

    In some children's hospitals, such as the one in the city I live in, they have teachers on staff in the hospital that work with the kids that are there long term.
     
  5. a.guillermo

    a.guillermo Rookie

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    Nov 5, 2014

    Well, I've never had that experience, but that sounds to be quite interesting! Haha
     
  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Nov 5, 2014

    I used to work at an inpatient psychiatric hospital for children and adolescents. There were two classrooms on the floor that were staffed by teachers and paras from the local school district. To be clear, these teachers and paras were regular school district employees, but instead of having classrooms in elementary/middle/high schools, they had classrooms in the psychiatric hospital.

    I often helped out in those classrooms and worked closely with those teachers and paras. They seemed to really enjoy their jobs. Their classes were small. Teachers were able to provide a lot of one-on-one instruction. Students came in and left regularly (the average stay at that hospital was 7-10 days), so it was more of a tutoring or resource-type setup than a traditional classroom with regular lessons. The teachers were all special ed teachers, even though not all the students were classified as special ed students.
     
  7. Leatherette

    Leatherette Comrade

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    Nov 5, 2014

    I taught in a hospital-on the inpatient psych unit, the rehab unit, and the oncology unit. I also worked with kids while they were getting dialysis. I liked the setting and the small class sizes, but it often felt more like tutoring than teaching, and a lot of it was assessment to assist in students' re-entry to their communities. I felt like it was a great service for the kids, though. It was a little taste of normalcy for the kids, too. Working with kids on the oncology unit could be heartwrenching, and if I had even the slightest sniffle, I couldn't work with them, and we'd both be sad. One of my students died soon after I left, and that was very hard.

    That said, it was an experience that I am grateful to have had, and I learned a lot. it was also a great support for families.
     

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