Teaching in a DOD school overseas

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by HorseLover, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. HorseLover

    HorseLover Comrade

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    Jan 22, 2014

    Does anyone have any experience with this? I am thinking it might be something that I would like to try as it would be a fun adventure to teach overseas. Thoughts?
     
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  3. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Jan 22, 2014

    No experience, but I would love to try it. Have you applied through the DoD website?
     
  4. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Jan 22, 2014

    I'd love to try it as well!
     
  5. HorseLover

    HorseLover Comrade

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    Jan 22, 2014

    No I haven't. Still in the "thinking" stage though it may be getting too late for this upcoming school year. I also don't see any teacher openings posted right now
     
  6. HeatherY

    HeatherY Habitué

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    Jan 22, 2014

    I lived overseas with my military husband, but they don't often "local hire" teachers. I worked as a sub for two years. Feel free to pm me. There is someone else on the board that subs DODDS too and might have gotten a full time job this year, I'm not sure.

    Obviously, there is a lot of difference between areas/countries and schools just like there is in the states. DODDS schools tend to rank very high in testing. You can't be posted overseas if you have a child with very special needs or severe learning disabilities, (because there just aren't resources) so you tend to have "easier" demographics in your classroom compared to stateside. Parents tend to be more involved and the community is closer in general.

    I'm not sure how the hiring works, though obviously lots of people get hired each year. I do know that you don't often get a choice of where you are being sent. Once you are in, you can request certain places and if there are openings, then you can be moved. Just like stateside, it's better to have multiple certs to be more flexible.

    You will have base access, which means you can use the services such as the grocery store, though you may or may not be allowed to live on base. There is a housing allowance as a part of the paycheck and the base will assist you in finding local housing.

    You would probably have to apply without seeing stated open positions. The open transfer time isn't until later in the year. You might as well get your information in early.
     
  7. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    Jan 23, 2014

    I did this for 4 years and loved it. Met my wife, learned to speak German, and traveled all over Europe. I was teaching on a civilian base (NSA spy base). All the parents had postgraduate degrees, class sizes were 12 to 16, unlimited field trip budget, PX and other military privileges and on and on.

    My wife taught on an infantry base with class sizes 30 - 38. Most of the parents were low income with nothing past high school. This was a few years ago and things could be very different now.
     

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