teaching # identification

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by SBP0429, Nov 3, 2011.

  1. SBP0429

    SBP0429 Rookie

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    Nov 3, 2011

    Does anyone have any ideas for teaching numbers to students who are struggling with identifying/remembering the numbers....I have one student who cannot remember 0-5. I want him to master these before he will be able to master 6-10.

    Any suggestions?
     
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  3. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Nov 3, 2011

    Is the issue that he learns them and can identify them, but then forgets them the next day? Or, is he not understanding the concept of number identification at all?

    Two quick thoughts: more repetition, spaced practice (not mass practice all at once, but smaller chunks throughout the day), multi-sensory activities (e.g., draw numbers in shaving cream, trace numbers with a laser on the wall, say the number aloud while drawing it).
     
  4. christine89

    christine89 Companion

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    Nov 3, 2011

    Well for number writing, I've used little number rhymes to help remember how to write the numbers so the same could probably be used to identify the numbers. I can't recall where I got them but they are pretty common. Like one of them is "around a tree, around a tree, that's the way we make a 3."
     
  5. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Nov 3, 2011

    Might be worth a try for sure. It may be likely, though, that with a kid who's pretty young, that such a rhyme might be even more to remember than the initial number :). It also might be a bit verbal for a kid that age, but still. I guess it depends on the kid - if he has a good memory, is fairly verbal, and just is having a hard time sorting things out, it may work, but don't be too hard on yourself if it doesn't :).
     
  6. MrsM7

    MrsM7 Rookie

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    Nov 4, 2011

    You could try Touchmath for number recognition too.
     
  7. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Nov 4, 2011

    Oh yeah! When I taught kinder, each kid had a package of the numbers and the poem. Each day (in the beginning of the school year), or maybe it was each week.... it's been a while since I taught kinder, we would focus on a number. The numbers were large and had room inside to color in. Does that make sense? And below the number was the poem. Inside the number had dotted lines and arrows to show how you make the number. They would use their finger and trace the number (follow the lines) as we would say the number rhymes together. We would do this several times, just with our fingers. I had mine up and would trace with them. Then, they would get their pencils out and trace with their pencil. During workshop time, they had to rainbow write the number (pick five different colors and trace the lines).

    0= zero the hero

    1= one is fun!

    2= around and back on the railroad track, choo choo!

    3= around the tree, around the tree, that's the way to make a three

    4= down and over and down some more, that's the way to make a four

    5= down, around, put on a hat! (I THINK that's how it went)
    You could also say, "across, down, and around", but my kids liked the put on a hat better.

    6= a line and hoop, that makes six (again, I believe that's how it went)

    7= across the sky and down from heaven, that's the way to make a seven

    8= make an s, but do not wait, go back up and close the gate

    9= a loop and line, that makes 9!
     
  8. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Nov 4, 2011

    For 5 I say down, big fat belly, hat on top and the kids crack up and then remember what a 5 looks like.

    My question would be if he has visual discrimination in other areas, does he recogninze shapes, can he idenify letters, differentiate letters and numbers, etc... If not, he needs to be taught to notice what is the same and different about letters/numbers (specific featueres) and then overtaught the numbers.
     
  9. AMK

    AMK Aficionado

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    Nov 5, 2011

    touchmath is good but i am no longer allowed to use it with our new program: everyday math.
    Is it number writing or identifying numbers?
    I do a lot of different things with numbers in the beginning, making number posters, practice making numbers in shaving, sand, etc..
    I do number puzzles using paper plates. I write the number on one side of the plate and use stickers on the other side. I cut the plates and the kids have to match them like puzzles.
    Concentration is good too.
     
  10. katrinkakat

    katrinkakat Connoisseur

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    Nov 7, 2011

    Cute!! Thanks!!

     
  11. lwag14

    lwag14 Rookie

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    Nov 30, 2011

    In my class I play a game in which I have a bunch of number cards in my hand. I announce a number and an activity like jumping jacks. I then flip through the number cards and when I get to the number that was previously said the kids get up and do that many jumping jacks. We also do a lot of number writing practice and count how many worksheets. For kids that struggle with numbers a pull them aside and work with flashcards (something that I would not recommend for a whole class lesson). I use flashcards that have a number on one side and pictures on the back. I go through the cards if the student knows the number I'll put that card to the side if he/she doesn't I'll have him/her count the pictures on the back and then put it in a different pile. I'll keep going through the numbers that the student needed to count the pictures until he/she gets them all without counting. Sometimes I'll give them an erase board and have them write whatever number I say. Somehow they like doing this better one-on-one or in small groups than they do as a whole class. They like the personal attention and showing me how much they do know.
     

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