teaching history for the first time. HELP!

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by NewToThis_, Jun 13, 2012.

  1. NewToThis_

    NewToThis_ New Member

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    Jun 13, 2012

    I have been assigned to teach world history for the time next semester. I have an endorsement in social studies, but this is actually the first time I'm going to teach social studies. Any ideas about how to go about this? What is a typical class period like in a history class? (we are on 90 min block schedule)
    Any suggestion welcome!
    Thanks!
     
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  3. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Jun 13, 2012

    The teachers edition should help you out once you get it. I was just going through my Call to Freedom book and they actually had a whole separate small book that is for block scheduling. Maybe your series will have something similar. I will be teaching both World History and US History for the 1st time next year as well.
     
  4. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Jun 14, 2012

    I teach elementary, but my BA and MA are in history and I am BEGGING you to be sure and go beyond the textbook.

    I am sure Brendan and some other current HS teachers will chime in soon.
     
  5. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Jun 14, 2012

    I agree. I would suggest starting with your state's standards or curriculum map or pacing guide, splitting it into 15-20 minute chunks, then doing a few chunks each class period.

    I teach on the block, and I'll usually start them with a journal, lecture for 15-20 minutes, do a group activity for 15-20 minutes, lecture some more, another kind of activity, a short movie clip, an activity, etc. But I break everything into 15-20 minute chunks, because after that, you've lost them.
     
  6. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Jun 14, 2012

    Start with the state standards.
    Then, find out about district assessments.
    Then, find out about any district student outcomes (e.g. students are expected to write certain types of essays, complete problem solving activities, etc).
    Then, check out your textbook.
    Then, start building lessons/units, using the text and as much supplemental material you can find.
     
  7. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Jun 14, 2012

    Agreed.
     
  8. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jun 14, 2012

    Where's Rockguy? Isn't he the one with the fantastic social studies site? (I can't remember for sure... sorry if it's not him.)
     
  9. Ross

    Ross Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2012

    A couple of thoughts:

    What is your passion in history? Bring that to the classroom every day.

    Help the students understand whatever historical events you are teaching is related to their lives. That is what history does. It teaches us about ourselves.

    As what was said before, please minimize the use of the textbook.
     
  10. Ron6103

    Ron6103 Habitué

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    Jun 14, 2012

    I have taught high school history on a block schedule. My average class period involved at least 3 different activities. A daily lesson might look like this:

    1: Bell Ringer/Warm-up: What are the problems in the Catholic Church that lead up to the Reformation

    2. Lecture/Discussion (with PowerPoint) on the causes of the Reformation

    3. Primary Source Reading - Martin Luther's 95 Theses

    4. Video Clip - PBS Empires Special - Martin Luther

    --
    That would fill roughly 90 minutes, and cover the block. Each day was similar, although videos and readings wouldn't always be the additional activities used. Instead, I might do a group activity, a vocabulary exercise, an image analysis, a pop quiz, or whatever. But the key was to have multiple different activities each block to break up the time, and keep the students engaged.

    As for the textbook, I used it as a resource, but not the primary source for material. I gave the kids textbook reading for background information, but the bulk of the content came from me, along with supplemental readings (including primary sources).
     
  11. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Jun 17, 2012

    www.mrroughton.com has a bunch of assignments that would work well with block.

    You could spending 45 minutes presenting the content and 45 processing. With a 6-week summer school block you wouldn't likely even get through all 70 assignments in the entire course.
     
  12. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Jun 17, 2012

    I suggest breaking things up into blocks as well. I never lecture for more than a half-an-hour and included in the lecture is discussion. A typical day in my class (when I taught on the block) includes:

    1. Review homework and previous day (15-minutes)
    2. Lecture and Discussion (30-minutes)
    3. Assignment, or Activity (45-minutes)

    My homework was always reading and responding to the reading (via terms and questions or mini-projects). Activities include anything from primary source analysis, group works, projects, simulations, or Socratic seminars.
     

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