teaching child with autism

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by michygarcia, Mar 13, 2012.

  1. michygarcia

    michygarcia Rookie

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    Mar 13, 2012

    Hi! i have a question. i'll be teaching a child with autism about the different parts of the body but the problem is, i'm having a hard time getting his attention. What will i do? could you give some suggestions?

    Thank you! your answers are highly appreciated :)
     
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  3. Rox

    Rox Cohort

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    Mar 13, 2012

    What have you tried?
     
  4. michygarcia

    michygarcia Rookie

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    Mar 15, 2012

    ill be teaching a child with autism. i have not tried anything yet. Could you help me and give suggestions? thank you :)
     
  5. hlewis97

    hlewis97 New Member

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    Jun 1, 2012

    Patient Postive Redirection

    When working with children who are on the spectrum it is really important to remember and know their excat needs. Children with autism want to fit in, they want friends, and they want to have fun. Typically a child with high functioning autism like aspergures will have lots of melt downs, moderate aggression and a total obession with one object or idea. Regardless of what your teaching them (and you'll find yourself explaining everything from basic social skills and manners to eleborate concepts of how things function) just remember if they could be different they would be. They dont want to be so frustrated and over whelmed. They want friends and they want to please, they just cant always quite make it. It also helps to become good friends with their parents or guardians. Form a functioning relationship where you can laugh off the small things and gain their support for the big things. That parent or guardain love their child and want to see them succeed. They'll often look to you for support and guidance. I have extensive work with children on the spectrum. I find them to be both the most challenging and the most rewarding of all of the high functioning behavioral disorders
     
  6. kevmic28

    kevmic28 Companion

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    Jun 24, 2012

    I had a student who liked to color. So I made a deal with him that once he finished his work he could color. I provided him with coloring sheets that had to do with the lessons we were working on so even though he was coloring he was still learning. Find out what your student likes and go from there.
     
  7. Securis

    Securis Cohort

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    Jun 24, 2012

    To add to what hlewis97 is saying, relationship is more important, in this case, than learning new skills. Skills will follow the relationship. Without knowing to what degree your student in on the spectrum, it is hard to offer specific strategies but I'll give a list of some that can be used universally.

    1. Lots and lots of visual cues/ PECS may not be necessary but you can make your own if you want.
    2. Lots and lots of time limits and count downs for tasks and redirecting behaviors.
    3. Use 'first' this and 'then' this.
    4. Be specific and concrete.
    5. Break tasks down to the smallest manageable portions

    Hope those help. And I'd also think your district or school would have a resource for students of this nature already in place.
     
  8. Lotte

    Lotte Companion

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    Jun 30, 2012

    Sent you a PM
     

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