Teaching Beginning Addition

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by cdnali, Sep 26, 2010.

  1. cdnali

    cdnali Rookie

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    Sep 26, 2010

    Hello,
    I have a set of parents that want me to work on addition with their child (11 year old with Autism). I think this is totally doable and a great goal as she can count to 100 and is able to add with pictures but they want her to understand how to add, not just rote memorization. I am at a loss as to how to make her understand what addition is - how do you teach addition that ensures you understand the principals behind how/why you add?
     
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  3. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Sep 28, 2010

    Try TouchMath!
     
  4. UVAgrl928

    UVAgrl928 Habitué

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    Sep 28, 2010

    I agree! I use TouchMath with several of my students. I use TouchMoney with ALL my students (Gen ed students)! It's a great program :)
     
  5. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Sep 28, 2010

    TouchMath is awesome. It is also how I was taught, hehe, so I can vouch for how useful it is! :D

    Manipulatives are helpful. I like to use two sided tokens--one side yellow, one side red---and show adding two different groups that way.
     
  6. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Sep 28, 2010

    TouchMath and manipulatives (dice are very useful for small problems) were how I was taught after I was able to understand any concepts in math.
     
  7. TAKlinda

    TAKlinda Rookie

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    Oct 6, 2010

    Since you mentioned she can count to one hundred, I assume that she can't do addition without using manipulatives. I work with students of all ages that are unable to add or subtract without counting on their fingers.
    Strategies:
    Adding or subtracting to 4, use 'touch math' - have them count up or down using the points on the numbers.
    Learn the doubles for addition by working up, start with the doubles they know and add 2. Eg. 5+5=10, so 6+6 is 2 more or 12; 7+7 is 2 more or 14, etc.
    Related facts: use the doubles, if 6+6=12, then 7+6=13.
    Regroup: 8+6 could become 7+7 or 10+4
    Math ladder: for subtracting 11-5 to 18-9
    Magic nine: for subtracting nine

    Linda
    Teach All Kids
     
  8. Kate Change

    Kate Change Companion

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    Oct 7, 2010

    My first step for teaching concepts is to use the dice (as some one else suggested). I have a little template where the child rolls each of the dice and prints the number beside it. Then the dice go together at the end and are counted together. After it seems that this is easy, I have the student use tokens to build the number and then add them at the end. Next they draw dots etc...

    This doesn't work for really high numbers, obviously, but it's been a good starting point for me.
     

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