Teaching at a poorly ranked school

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Johnjoel, May 10, 2012.

  1. Johnjoel

    Johnjoel Companion

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    May 10, 2012

    Quick question: Do you think teaching at a poorly ranked school effects your chances of getting a teaching job elsewhere? Would other districts turn their nose at a good teacher because they taught at a district that is thought to be a "bad" district?
     
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  3. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    May 11, 2012

    It's possible, as people always form opinions based on things that don't exactly make sense. I would say - regardless of the district - that you keep as much info as you can on your track record personally as a teacher. Any intelligent interviewer/administrator would understand that your individual performance is different from the performance of your district, and would look for specific evidence that you were a good teacher.

    A few problems arise - first, educational success isn't just dependent on the teacher, so to the extent that you work at a school that is highly dysfunctional, that could impact your personal performance as a teacher quite a bit.

    Also, some districts are known for really doing a lot to develop their teachers. For example, one teacher I knew came from a district out-of-state that was known regionally for doing an exceptional job preparing teachers to teach beginning reading. To the extent that an admin would be interested in your professional development, and knows that your old district didn't do anything worthwhile, that could have a slight impact. But, again, if you try to compensate for any district weaknesses (such as attending your own PD), then that would help.

    Overall, I'd say if you feel strongly that you could do a good job in a district or school despite it not be good or ranked well, I'd go for it. It actually might very much highlight your strengths as a teacher if you are able to perform well despite your district or school.
     
  4. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    May 11, 2012

    If you have taught in a district that is known as a very challenging district for several years it usually looks good on a resume. Especially if you have taught in one of the tougher schools.
     
  5. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    May 11, 2012

    I was thinking just this, especially if you have good results and good references to show from it! My opinion is that if you can teach effectively in a poor district, then you'll be unstoppable in many other districts.
     
  6. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    May 11, 2012

    Usually if you are successful in a poorly ranked school, other schools will see that as a good sign. If you can succeed with little in terms of supplies/technology but many behaviors, you probably can succeed in a better ranked school.
     

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