Teaching at a local Community College

Discussion in 'General Education' started by CBR Shadow, Oct 2, 2015.

  1. CBR Shadow

    CBR Shadow Rookie

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    Oct 2, 2015

    I'm 30 years old and have 8 years in the manufacturing/engineering fields, but would like to teach 3D modelling (AutoCAD, Solidworks, Revit) classes at the local Jr. Colleges. I'm not sure what steps I need to take to qualify for that type of position. I have a bachelors degree in Industrial Technology from an Illinois state school. Do I need a certificate or further schooling to be able to teach at this level?
    What would the next steps be for finding this type of position?
    Anyone have experience with this?

    Thanks,
    R
     
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  3. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Oct 2, 2015

    For the most part, colleges don't require teaching credentials, but they usually do require at least a Master's degree.
     
  4. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Oct 3, 2015

    Illinois has a Community College Board, and its Web site lists job openings by district: http://www.iccb.state.il.us/employment.html You might find some job listings there; even if the job has been filled, the application packet and a list of requirements may be online. In addition, try looking up the sorts of classes you'd like to teach, then research the staff members who are listed as teaching them to see what degrees etc. they hold.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2015
  5. renard

    renard Companion

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    Oct 3, 2015

    It depends. In my field (ESL), an MS is required. For technical degrees, it isn't uncommon for colleges to prefer a certificate in adult education (in addition to your subject degree, of course). I *suspect* that is the case in your field, but don't hesitate to ask them. Check faculty websites - they usually list their degrees.
     
  6. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Oct 3, 2015

    The CC I teach for requires a Master degree in the content area, or a Masters degree in a different area with 18+ graduate hours in the content area.

    If you'd consider teaching HS, my state has an impressive plan to bring industry folks into the classroom without a teaching background. Maybe your state does, too? In my state it is called Career and Tech Ed (CTE). Some classes/workshops are required during the first couple of years of teaching, but it seems like a very manageable process. We have the types of classes you describe wanting to teach in my HS, and we are a tiny HS.

    If this interests you, and Kansas isn't too far away, check out our state's website http://www.ksde.org/Agency/Division...s/CSASHome/CareerTechnicalEducation(CTE).aspx and PSU's CTE program. http://kccte.pittstate.edu/
     

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