Teaching about 08 presidential candidates

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Cthdenver, Feb 3, 2008.

  1. Cthdenver

    Cthdenver Rookie

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    Feb 3, 2008

    I have made it a point to be Teaching about the 08 presidential candidates. I am trying to find some good reading material that I could use in the classroom on this issue. Anything that might explain what each ones advantages and disadvantages. If you know anything let me know.​
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 3, 2008

    I wouldn't be referring to advantages and disadvantages- that would be OPINION...stick to what the candidates say about the issues, without inferring your personal feelings one way or the other...

    My local paper had a great spreadsheet this weekend on the issues and where each candidate stands...you could probably find something similar online...
     
  4. Cthdenver

    Cthdenver Rookie

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    Feb 3, 2008

    what paper was it. Maybe they have it on the peapers website???
     
  5. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Feb 3, 2008

    I'm doing the same thing. PM me your email and I will send you what I am doing for their research project. Each child is either researching one of the candidates or an issue. If they pick the candidate, they write a biography, state how the candidate feels about two big issues and discusses one of the candidate's quotes. If they research the issue, they have to state the background on the issue, and then pick three candidates from each party and state how they feel about the issue. My kids are 3rd and 4th, so a little younger than yours probably are.

    We looked at Kids Pick the President on the Nickelodeon website, which has information on all the candidates and the issues. We are also doing some of the Scholastic and Weekly reader activities online. We have predicted winners and followed the primaries all along.

    As we go through the primaries we are also discussing issues, doing some map work, etc. Most of our discussions have been sort of round table discussions of issues, pretty easy-breezy and conversational. We also are reading a guided reading book about how the president is elected. I think that's it!
     
  6. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Feb 4, 2008

    Usually the League of Women Voters has this type of information.
     
  7. Major

    Major Connoisseur

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    Do you have personal favorites? And, if so, do you put emphasis on your favorites?
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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  9. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    I don't share my opinions w/ my class. When we do a prediction of the winners before a primary or caucus, my TA and I will take part in the predictions, but I don't discuss why or why I don't like particular candidates. It's a personal decision as to who someone votes for, and parents can discuss that with their kids, but not me.

    I have tried to be very unbiased but probably do allow my liberal west coast side to come out a bit. I won't however let my kids chant "Down with Bush" which a kid came in saying one day. I also try to limit the president bashing, but it's a major theme amongst my students. I keep telling them to focus on the upcoming election, not the past... look toward the future! I also tell them a lot that they need to look at the issues, not just the candidates they like based on whatever they base them on (hype.) We are now starting to get into the issues more and the kids are starting to see the difference and look at the issues. A kid who was a supporter of one candidate found out they didn't support something she really cared about. It was a real shocker for her, but a good lesson!
     
  10. JayR

    JayR Rookie

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    Feb 13, 2008

    Don't forget there is plenty of math in the elections. If candidate X wins the states of California, ..., etc. is that enough to be the majority candidate? Is one party's process more "fair" than hte other's? Can you come up with an example where one candidate wins the popular vote while the other wins the electoral vote? Search the Internet under "Finite Math" to find Is there a more fair system?
     
  11. INteacher

    INteacher Aficionado

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    Feb 13, 2008

    With middle schoolers, you can also look at each parties platform. You can access party platform on each parties national website. Reading the platforms can really help students understand the differences between the parties, which will help your activity become more about the politcial process than a popularity contest. And take JayR advice and add the math :)
     

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