Teaching a student with dyslexia...help!!

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by HWilson, Aug 19, 2011.

  1. HWilson

    HWilson Comrade

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    Aug 19, 2011

    SO my GC came to me yesterday to let me know about a student of mine that is dyslexic. She provided me with a copy of the 504 and told me we will have a meeting soon to "revamp/review" the 504 but she wanted to go ahead and let me know, which I appreciate greatly!! The thing is SC does not recognize Dyslexia as a LD so the student does not recieve services!!!!!!!!!!! I am floored!!! I feel so sorry for this student! They could use the extra attention and is not able to get it! :eek:hmy:

    The 504 focused mostly on Math (which also surprised me - the only thing I can figure is it is maybe easier to work around letters instead of numbers???) I pulled the student aside today and talked to him/her about it and asked how I could help/do. S/he was great about it and told me what helps. They also wanted me to talk to the GC to make sure I let her know that the student's younger sibling has it.

    I already have a method to use for testing, but I'm worried about in-class examples and problems we cover. I don't want to walk over and read every problem to him/her because I feel that is more obvious and not protecting their right of privacy.

    Any suggestion how to teach math to a student with dyslexia that also does NOT receive LD services???
     
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  3. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Aug 20, 2011

    States tend not to recognize dyslexia as a LD. Texas is one of the only states to allow IEPs for the reason for Dyslexia, I believe.

    Ask the student in private how their reading ability is or ask the GC to see their evaluations? It could be dyslexia that was privately remediated, so it only causes minimal issues.

    You could suggest at the 504 meeting that the student be placed on an IEP for Other Health Impairment. Or depending on the results of the evaluations, other categories. If the student has difficulties in math, argue that they need an IEP for a suspected mathematics disability and then they can get reading remediation.
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Usually a student with dyslexia struggles with reading (letters), while dyscalculia is involving math and numbers. So it is very strange that this would only be impacting math.

    I would highly recommend that the 504 plan state that the student ask for read aloud. This way you do not need to worry about reading everything to the student but s/he can ask when s/he needs assistance with words or other areas of the mathematics.
     
  5. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    SC and other states do recognize dyslexia, just not by name. Special education categories are general "buckets" where a number of problems are grouped. So, for example, within the category of specific learning disability - reading, there may be a number of different specific problems served under that label.

    So, simply having been diagnosed with dyslexia itself doesn't necessarily guarantee special education services, but few labels really do. It's even possible, for example, to have been diagnosed with Autism and not be served within the Autism/developmental disorders category!

    Basically, here's a good way to think about it - throw out labels, and first focus on the child's difficulty. What can't a child do that led to the dyslexia diagnosis, then think about how those problems fit within special education categories. There's a pretty good chance that this child's problems would fall into the special education category if the problems were severe enough.

    That being said, there are multiple problems with special education diagnosis, which is one reason for the recent development of changes to diagnostic procedures involving such things as RtI, which you district may be use? So, it isn't to say necessarily that if the child doesn't qualify, then they don't need help - there are cracks to fall through, for sure. My main point here, though, is that dyslexia is not specifically overlooked or excluded - it's just not listed by name, like most other problems kids encounter.

    -----

    Alright, so all of that being said, the first place to start with helping any child - even one with dyslexia - is a thorough assessment. What would you do with other kids who come into your room in terms of learning about them and their learning needs? Do the same thing with this child. There may be differences between this child and other child, but dyslexia isn't one of those things that is the same for all kids, like some medical conditions. Dyslexia itself is actually a very broad term, and simply means "inability to read" - it doesn't refer to a specific neurological condition, specific problem within reading (e.g., poor phonological processing), or specific skill deficits. Some kids with dyslexia may be similar to each other, but some may not. The main point - you still have to treat this child as an individual, and start with a thorough assessment of learning needs and strengths.

    Hope this helps!
     
  6. umdyslexiahelp

    umdyslexiahelp New Member

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    Sep 1, 2011

    DyslexiaHelp - University of Michigan

    Hi HWilson,

    We have a wealth of information on dyslexia and school, for dyslexics, parents, as well as professionals like yourself. It's all here on our website: dyslexiahelp.umich.edu. Be sure to visit it to find answers to your questions, and if you need any further assistance, don't hesitate to contact us. Our e-mail is listed in our profile on this forum.

    I hope this helps!

    Best,
    UM DyslexiaHelp
     
  7. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    EdEd, our local schools would tell parents all the time that dyslexia was medical so they don't give IEPs. Yeah, some really believe crap like that because no one tells them any different and apparently they haven't read IDEA.
     
  8. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    That doesn't even make sense - that something is "medical" vs. not? Sounds like a pretty confused district :).
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I have no idea, but some things that I imagine will be problematic:

    - any discussion of symmetry. The idea of line symmetry, where the left side and the right side match, is probably going to be an issue., as will point and rotational symmetry.

    -trig. If you're using SOHCAHTOA, the whole process of labeling the sides may be a problem.

    - alternate interior angles, corresponding angles. I normally show the kids the "Z" shape for alternate interiors and the "F" for corresponding. Their direction doesn't matter, so perhaps this is workable, but I would tread carefully.

    - similar polygons. I bet it's tricky finding the corresponding sides. I think I would make a point with the class of finding the congruent angles, then physically moving my finger across the paper to the corresponding sides. It's as good a way to teach it as any other, so no special modification is needed for that student.


    I can't think; we haven't started classes yet and I'm not into math mode. What else do you cover?
     
  10. HWilson

    HWilson Comrade

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    Well we don;t cover Trig and I may sound like an idiot but I have no ideas what SOHCAHTOA is ..... lol

    You're right, geometry will be a challenge, especially with cooresponding angles, maybe even reflection. I wondered of order of operations will be an issue with her or even patterns. We did have a quiz this week and for an one of the answers was "24" and she wrote "42" so I looked at it for a while trying to decide what to do so I simply circled it, wrote the correct answer and didn't count off. I do think it was truly her dyslexia and not an error in math.
    Im hoping fractions and scale drawings won't be an issue. So far things are going smoothly!!
     
  11. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    (I know you're anxious to preserve the student's privacy. Since I have no idea who the student is, I've decided to refer to the student as a female.)

    -OK, that's another thing-- it will be very important for her to show every bit of work. That way, you'll be able to distinguish between math errors and those caused by her dyslexia. (Then again, I'm HUGE on partial credit, so my kids all show all their work.)

    - On order of operations, I bet exponents are a problem-- I can see a kid with dyslexia confusing 5 squared with either 52 or 5 times 2.

    - If you do any set theory, I can see her confusing the symbols for Union and Intersection-- lots of kids do. If it's any help the U is the symbol for Union-- you may need to change one of those symbols for her, or agree to boldface one of them all the time.

    - Now that I think of it, the computer may be your best friend. As you go along, you could build a key for her-- so the Union symbol is always bodfaced, as is the exponent, or whatever. She could keep that key with her when testing. It wouldn't tell her anything the other kids could really use, just aid her in distinguishing things as she read them. Does that make sense??

    - In Pythagorean Theorem. always have ALL the kids label the hypotenuse first-- she can find the right angle, then trace across the triangle to find it. The other 2 sides are interchangeable.

    I think the best tool at your disposal is the girl's willingness to discuss her issue. I would take advantage-- any time she loses you on her work, ask her to talk you through it.

    (SOHCAHTOA is a common method of remembering the Trig ratios:
    Sin = Opposite leg / Hypotenuse
    Cos = Adjacent leg / Hypotenuse
    Tan = Opposite leg / Adjacent leg )

    What other topics do you cover?
     
  12. catlover

    catlover Rookie

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    Sep 4, 2011

    Is it the case that the child's dyslexia isn't severe enough to cause an adverse impact? Or is everyone on the IEP team saying "Yup, that's having an adverse effect all right, but our hands are tied -- dyslexia isn't an eligibility category in IDEA."

    Because if it is the latter case, dyslexia is in fact included in IDEA, but it is buried in a place where it is hard to find. See section B in the quote below from IDEA 2004:

    This is in the definitions section of the statue, not the eligibility section, so it can be overlooked.
     
  13. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Texas will only recognize dyslexia in an IEP IF that student has other LD problems. Then, they will address the dyslexia within an IEP. Otherwise, the kids with dyslexia receive a dyslexia bundle accommodations or a 504 plan. That is my understanding since I have kids that have dyslexia and teach in Texas.
     
  14. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    HWilson, what topics will you be covering this year? We'll be happy to give you some concrete coping strategies, but I'm still trying to get focused on Geometry; it's been 5 years since I taught 7th grade math.
     

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