Teachersk Match Games Comprehensive List

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by teachersk, May 8, 2010.

  1. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    May 8, 2010

    Okay, I am really serious about this curriculum now.

    I want to make a comprehensive list of all of the match games that could possibly exist.

    Let's list them like this:

    Subject Area: (insert subject area)
    Matching Method: (several cards in one envelope, pairs, etc.)
    Topic: (what is being matched)
    Variations: (how to vary the activity for generalization)

    I'll make a big list and we'll keep it going. Feel free to also include links to various websites that would help with that topic (like the ones that teach posted, and the one I posted with the Fry nouns).

    I think this could be fun... but that might just be me because I am obsessed with these match games....
     
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  3. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

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    May 8, 2010

    http://forums.atozteacherstuff.com/showthread.php?t=107776

    Subject area: English Language Arts
    matching Method: clothes pinning cards together
    topic: rhyming words
    variations: matching picture to picture, words to words, pictures w/words to pictures/with words, more than 1 rhyme for each word

    Subject English Language arts
    matching method: putting two cards into the envelope with the correct whole compound word/picture on it.
    topic: compound words
    variations: picture of whole word on envelope with word and pictures of 2 words that form the compound word, just word on envelope and just words on cards.

    Subject: basic/functional skills
    matching method: matching (clothes pinning) names to the corresponding picture.
    topic: recognizing/matching people's names with their faces.
    variations: keeping the people limited to the people students see in one setting (a school set and a seperate home set), mixing both sets together.

    Subject: life skills/ health
    matching methods: sorting in envelopes
    topic: private and public behaviors
    variations: the categories could broaden to private and public (including behaviors and places)http://www.setbc.org/pictureset/resource.aspx?id=313
     
  4. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

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    May 8, 2010

    Subject: Science/functional skills
    matching method: envelopes with pictures of weather on it/weather word/season and cards with pictures/words of clothes on it
    topic: weather/season and the clothes that are appropriate to wear for each weather or season
    variations:broadening the categories,having more than one item for each season. flipflops, tank top, shorts, and bathing suit for summer etc.

    sorry forgot to edit and add it to my last post!
     
  5. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    May 9, 2010

    Holy crap. You guys are going to keep me busy all summer long, aren't you! :D It's a fun kind of busy though.

    Here's one that I have already and it's in my vocational job bins for matching:

    Subject area: English Language Arts
    matching Method: clothes pin the undercase letter to its uppercase letter on a piece of cardboard.
    topic: Basic ABCs
    variations: use pics that start with that letter instead of uppercase letters, or have both under and upper case letters on the clothes pin and have them match to a word that starts with that letter

    Hey, I like this idea about generalization. At first I was a dork and went, "Wha...??" and then when I started thinking about it, it made total sense. DUH!! Of course now not only do I have to make a thousand matching games this summer. But I have to make THREE OF EVERY KIND I MAKE JUST TO GENERALIZE IT. lol/cry
     
  6. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

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    May 9, 2010


    Yeah, but then it is so easy to flip their work around every day. They can practice the same skill every day for however long you want with different cards!

    I have been making sets of vocabulary words based on the unit/content we are working on and the interests of my kids. I make them in sets of 10, but some kids I might target only 5 words or 3 words with. I have picture (photo) to picture (photo) match, picture to line drawing match, picture to word match, and word to word match using different fonts. So, for one set, let's say Zoo Animals, I might have:

    2 sets of photo cards depicting zoo animals
    2 sets of line drawing (Boardmaker) of the same animals (maybe one is black and white and one is color)
    2 sets of word cards with the zoo animals names, written in different fonts, sizes, or colors
    1 set of word cards with animals actions (Boardmaker) on them (ex: jump goes with kangaroo, roar goes with lion, etc.)
    1 manila envelope with "Zoo Animals" on it
    1 set of envelopes with zoo animal names written on them
    1 set of 10 plain envelopes

    Basically I can use them for kids at any level. My lowest can match photos, my middle kids can match photo to drawing or b and w to color, or sort by category, my higher kids can read and match word to picture or animal to what they do, etc.

    I LOVE MATCH CARDS.

    I was thinking about this the other day. I have worked with several kids over the years that can match until the cows come home, but just struggle with auditory comprehension. Therein lies the problem with some of the curriculum progressions I have used in the past. They get to a point where they are supposed to identify words or pictures auditorily and then they just get stuck and frustrated. This makes skills so much more visual and concrete, if you can just make sure they get generalized.

    Also, I have one kid this year that struggles SO MUCH with attending to task. I think he literally hears me make a request (give me dog, etc.), starts to get it, gets distracted on his way to picking up the card, and then forgets what I asked. The match cards make it so much easier for him because he has that visual cue of what he was doing. Like, he'll get distracted, then look at his card and think, oh yeah, I'm looking for the dog. And match. Since I started this at the end of March, he has learned to read over 50 words and my direct each sessions with him have gotten so much more efficient.

    I could post Boardmaker files of the stuff I have made somewhere....Adapted Learning maybe? I have gotten stuff off of there but never posted before.

    Oooh, Ohhh. Also. I have started using the small photo albums from the dollar store - you know, the ones with the pockets? Using the match cards, it is really easy to make leveled books with their vocabulary words in them. Just slide the cards in. For my kids that know some sight words, one one side I might have cards that say, "I see a" or "It is a" and on the other side......viola, just slide in a match card. For my kids that don't read yet, I use the photo or drawing on one side and the word on the other, so at least they are exposed to print.

    eta: sorry, this wasn't really in the format you requested. I ramble purely due to excitement. :)
     
  7. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    May 9, 2010

    General Rule of Thumb for Matching Variations:
    • Card to card with clothespins
    • Card to envelope with value/name/word/number written on front
    • Card to card placed in blank envelope
    • Objects or manipulatives or coins placed into envelope
    • Voice recorder Velcro to card (Mini Me – see bottom of page)
    • Sorting (several cards go in each envelope- example – matching non identical items, envelope says CATS, all pictures of cats go in that envelope, another envelope says CARS, all cars go in that envelope – lower level would be to tape a picture of a cat on the front) – can also be used with identical items

    Matching Numbers
    • Number to number (identical)
    • Number to number (non-identical)
    • Change fonts
    • Change colors of numbers
    • Use number magnets or pieces (3-d) to place in number envelopes
    • Write a number on a clothespin, student must pin clothespin to number card
    • Leave blank cards for student to write number on and match to given cards

    Counting
    • Number to card with objects/pictures
    • Number to card with stickers
    • Number word to card with pictures
    • One set of pictures match to another set of pictures
    • Index card with number on it, student must put that many clothespins on it (can be errorless by drawing spots to clip clothespins)
    • Voice recorder (with number) match to card with items on it
    • Leave blank cards for student to write number on and match to given cards

    Number Words
    • Number to number word
    • Objects to number word
    • Envelope to put number of laminated pieces of paper in
    • Number word to put number of clothespins on
    • Number words (match)
    • Number words (change fonts – match)
    • Voice recorder to number word

    Money
    • Match coin to coin (tape coin to outside of envelope, student must place all types of that coin inside, Ziplock bag also works)
    • Match coin to name (word)
    • Count pennies to equal amount (1:1 correspondence) and place in bag or envelope with amount on front
    • Sort “coins” into one bag and “bills” into another bag
    • Match prices to prices (identical)
    • Match coin to value (can be picture of coin, drawing of coin, or card with actual coin taped to it)
    • Coin values to coins (cards with coins taped to it match to card with value on it)
    • Envelopes with prices on it match to picture of items with price tags
    • Envelopes with prices on it must be filled with correct amount of money
    • Catalog page with price circled match to envelope with value written on it, or clothespin to card with value
    • Sales receipt with change amount or total circled, student must put that amount with the receipt into an envelope or zip bag
    • Grocery list with prices (3-5 items) match to card with total price on it – you can make several lists to match with several totals
    • Voice recorder to total value or to envelope with correct amount

    Addition
    • Addition fact with answer (vertical)
    • Addition fact with answer (horizontal)
    • Addition fact with written answer
    • Story problem with written answer
    • Story problem with number answer
    • Pictures of items ( o o o + o o = ?) etc.
    • Envelopes with addition fact on the front, must be filled with correct number of manipulatives or laminated pieces
    • Allow use of calculator

    Equal / Not Equal
    • Match cards with equal amounts
    • Have envelopes with “equal” and “not equal” and include cards with two sets on them
    • Have student pin cards together in equal piles and not equal piles

    Temperature
    • Sort clothes into hot weather and cold weather
    • Match different temperature clothing to identical cards (same to same)
    • Match temperature to thermometer
    • Match written (word) temperature to thermometer
    • Match clothing to temperature

    Time
    • Match days of the week
    • Match months of the year
    • Change fonts
    • Match identical clocks (hour)
    • Match analog clock to digital clock
    • Match analog clock to written time
    • Match digital clock to written time
    • Put different clocks (varying fonts, etc.) into time envelopes (all of the 1:00 cards go in the 1:00 envelope, etc.)

    Fractions
    • Match fraction to fraction (identical)
    • Match fraction to fraction (nonidentical)
    • Match fraction to picture (pie, etc)
    • Match fraction to colored pieces (3 out of 4 bears colored red)
    • Match fraction to written words
    • Match picture or colored pieces to written words

    Measurement
    • Big and Small (envelope with BIG and picture on it, envelope with SMALL and picture on it, many different pictures that contain big or small pictures)
    • Tall and short (same idea)
    • Heavy and light (same idea) – pictures of heavy things (elephant, bus) and light things (feather, pencil)
    • All measurement conversions (make match cards for 1 lb , 16 oz, they pin together)
    • Cut strips of paper and include match cards with measurements on them, put ruler with activity, student must measure and match correct response
    • Appropriate unit of measure (picture of something, must determine what unit of measure to use)


    I just wrote up math... have tons more where this comes from. I actually do have a curriculum that I have written for my classroom that I am basing these off of.

    Will put more up later....

    Voice Recorders:
    (can get them for as cheap as $6 per recorder if you buy them in bulk) -- This is a purchase that is totally worth it if your school has a budget where you can order things. I use these to help with receptive identification in my match games (the kids are at independent work station, press button, listen to what it says, must velcro recorder to the correct card....)Works sooo well. Great for sight words, number ID, letter ID, even "answers" like "I would need to wear a jacket." (match that to the thermometer that says 40 degrees).

    http://store.voice-express.com/CategoryProductList.jsp?cat=All+our+Voice+Products

    **Just out of curiosity...

    How much would YOU pay for a set of match cards? (which would include generalization tasks - probably 4-5 sets of cards for one skill)

    How much do you think a DISTRICT would pay for a set of match cards?
     
  8. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

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  9. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

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    May 9, 2010

    I am so curious how this will all work!

    Have you thought about doing a CD or something with things to print and make oneself? I don't know, as a trial version or a cheaper version or something. You could make all math things on one CD, language on another, etc.

    Are you planning to offer options by grade/age level?

    This is probably a "duh" question, but when you wrote your curriculum, did you look at district/state standards? I ask because while this is not really important to me, I know it would make my district dig it more.

    I would probably pay (personally - out of my own pocket) $20.00-25.00 for high quality, long lasting set of generalized match cards. Based on the fact that a set of good flash cards runs like, 4-6 dollars, that's like 4-5 sets of flash cards, plus instructions and the fact that I don't have to make them...

    I think if the entire curriculum was standards based and grade level aligned, my district would probably pay about 400.00-500.00 for an age/grade level?
     
  10. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

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    May 9, 2010

    OK, sorry, I have more questions!

    When you teach new skills, are you teaching them with match cards? I have found this to be most effective, especially for my lowest kids, because, as I mentioned before, it is so visual and also the system is the same each time.

    Do you do most of your new skill teaching in group or 1:1?

    I was thinking more about the language piece too. Right now, I have made sets that target:

    -sight words (matching identical sight words/different fonts, etc.)
    -matching sentences to envelopes - envelope has a sentence on it, sentence strip says, "I see a," index card says, "monkey" or whatever and then they have to make the sentence and put it in
    -reading by sight - word to picture - color words, number words, shape words (all kindergarten standards, where I live)
    -reading by two attributes (blue heart, yellow triangle, etc.)
    -read a sentence and find the corresponding picture (comprehension)
    -choice of 2 words on a card; they have to put the clothespin on the correct spelling
    -choice of 2 sentences; they have to put the clothespin on the correct capital/punctuation
    -matching teachers' names to their pictures
    -classmates' names to their pictures
    -classroom areas to their pictures
    -scanned book covers to their titles
    -sequencing - they have to pin a "1" to the first thing, a "2" to the second, and a "3" to the third, then put the set in a manila envelope
    -names of community places to their pics

    love the idea of the mini recorders....that might help some of my kids who have a hard time with auditory to have multiple but self-initiated prompts

    vocabulary sets - this is where I think it would be helpful if there was a template or something to plug and print - that way you could make your own sets based on interests of your kids or district and state curriculum and standards.

    I have made several vocabulary sets with words, drawings, and then photo pictures. Amongst them:

    zoo animals, farm animals, plants, insects, colors, shapes, basic emotion words, school supplies, teachers/school adults, family members of my kids, classmates, community places, clothing items, schedule pictures (to move toward word schedules), and foods. I am trying to think of things that are most functional for them to know.....as most of my kids seem to be whole word readers.

    Another question. When you are teaching sight words, do you have them match a sight word to a picture? I have a kit from linguisystems that has symbols (like on writing with symbols) cards for each sight word. I have not tried it yet, but I am wondering if that might be a way to teach my lowest kids to actually read sight words instead of just match them. Or have you found a better way?

    ALSO! Next year I am so making some large group match card games for my new SMARTBOARD that I just found out I am getting. Yes!!!!
     
  11. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    May 10, 2010

    Okay I apoligize if this has been answered already, but sk (and beth by the looks of things) - how are you storing all of these match games? I see it all being very messy and disorganized and I'm very anal, so I would have to have an organized system of storage if I made all these suckers.
     
  12. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

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    May 10, 2010

    I don't think I've made nearly as many as sk - I've only been experimenting with them so far - but the ones I do have I have in those zipper plastic pencil pouch binders. I got a bazillion of them on sale last fall and they were just sitting around! I have them labeled, colors, shapes, numbers, vocabulary, etc. Probably 15 sets of 10 match cards/envelopes fit in the zipper pouch. Then I have the zipper pouches in baskets I got at the dollar store, 6-8 pouches to a basket.

    Granted I might have to rethink this if I get too many more - but I'm moving grade levels and schools for next year, so I'll be reorganizing a lot more than match cards. Ha.
     
  13. teacher12345

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    May 11, 2010

    What about organizing them in files folders and putting them in a hanging file bin? or in those little plastic drawer containers?
     
  14. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    May 11, 2010

    Hey guys,

    To answer the questions about what I will offer with my curriculum, it will probably be by skill (i.e. money skills - but each level of ability - matching, coin values, bills, prices, calculator, etc.) You know how you can buy the TouchMath kits by skill area (Time/Measurement, Money, Addition, etc.? I think kind of like that.) I don't know though. This is a project in the making. I really think I could make this work well for teachers, though. It is a great option for teachers who have self-contained classrooms with students on varying levels. That's something that I have always struggled with in my self-contained classroom - is meeting all of the needs of the students.

    For the question on teaching - I usually use the match cards as a way to introduce the skill, I reinforce it with worksheets/hands on activities, and then go back to the match cards as independent work jobs. This works well - I have sets of match cards that the kids work on as the very first thing for that period (i.e. Math, they pull out their binders and all start matching their match cards - each kid might have a different set but they can all be working on similar skills - it's GREAT for transitions, because the kids all know EXACTLY what they are supposed to do. Then we will work on that skill in Math class through other activities. Once a skill has been mastered, that's when it moves to their work stations.)

    So yes, using the cards to teach can work well. I think it's great to add other methods in there, too.

    As far as storage... here is how I do it.

    My school has a supply closet that has ....... 89734897343 binders in it. They gave me about 15 five inch binders at the beginning of the year, for portfolios, data books, etc. I do all of my data on the computer - and I save all of their work in drawers rather than binders, because it takes too much time to holepunch every little activity. So, I had all of these binders left over. I use the zippy pencil pouch things, but never write on the pencil pouch so I can use them again. I put an index card in the pencil pouch that says "telling time / hour" and then put the different sets of cards in that zippy pouch. The next one might say, "telling time / half hour" - or if I only have a few of each, I'll put them all in one zippy that says "telling time." Then I have a Math binder, Language Arts Binder, ADaptive Living SKills binder, etc. You can flip through quickly and get the ones you need.

    I have a teacher friend that I shared the "match card goodness" with... and she stores them in plastic Sterlite bins. She writes on the top of the bin on a piece of tape, "Time/Measurement." Then all of the sets are clipped with the butterfly clips inside. Not as easy to flip through, but much cheaper if you don't have binders laying around.

    Lots of ways to do it - but I recommend starting out with a system when you start creating them, so you don't go crazy.

    I have a few kids this year who love the laminator.

    My mind got to thinking that I could really set up a REAL vocational station for them to laminate all of these cards and we could use the money we make to put back into the classroom.

    That's just dreaming, of course. But, it seems like a good idea. If I created all of the files for them, I could even teach them how to open the correct file, check it off their list, and print it. (Feed the printer the flash cards, laminate them....)

    It could be awesome. Haha.
     
  15. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    May 11, 2010

    I also make matching "games" out of books... board books are the easiest, but any book would work. For my PreK's, they're matching a boardmaker picture to an object on the page (Or multiple objects...) (matching the animals or colors or foods or actions or whatever)... or if you can find the sticker storybooks, they're awesome (I saw some in a class but haven't found them myself yet)... laminate the pages or put in page protectors in a binder, velcro the correct sitcker on to complete the story.

    I also have some super easy ones that are just coloring pages- I isolate (by coloring) one element of the picture and they match the identical picture. This pretty much just works on attending/interacting with a book. I've done the same thing with books that I've made for super low kids on a theme "some apples are red. some apples are yellow. some apples are green. apples grow on trees." each page has an identical picture to match.
     
  16. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    May 11, 2010

    :lol: Okay, that was freakin' hilarious.

    Okay so basically you're telling me that if I'm going to make match cards for telling time, then I would make maybe 4 or 5 match card/systems for hour, 1/2 hour, 1/4 hour, minute - each system a different kind to generalize the application. Then I put all the time match systems in a binder or storage bin and label it.

    How do you keep track of who has mastered the skill? Do you do some sort of weekly/monthly formal assessment? Or is it just by observation?

    Right now, I have my kids do "work stations" which includes file folder games (which they go through at LIGHTENING SPEED), worksheet folders, vocational job bins, binders with laminated worksheets in them, math games, lang. arts games, work books, etc. Then I do the whole set up like centers, complete with a chart and a timer.

    Would I add the match sets to the work stations that I already have? Or would I rotate work stations and put out match cards and then take those away and replace them with file folder games...

    Holy crap. My brain is going to explode. :dizzy: Maybe I'm making it harder than it needs to be.
     
  17. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    May 11, 2010

    I use the match cards in conjunction with other teaching materials to actually "teach" the skill. The work stations have only mastered materials in them, so the kids should really be getting them on their own, for the most part. My aides will check the work and if a kid has done the work completely wrong, we will revisit that skill during a teaching session.

    I do have data sheets that I keep taped to the side of their work stations, and about once a week my aides will update the data for various skills.

    I would recommend adding the match cards as a part of their work stations. Honestly, the match cards are great because they TAKE FOREVER and they are ALWAYS reinforcing important skills. The greatest thing is that once you have created a bunch of them for yourself, you can rotate in old skills that were mastered a few months ago.

    I am telling you, the reason my kids have made so much progress this year is because of this whole system. I teach them in direct teach during their instruction period, they practice under my supervision, they master skill, they reinforce during independent work station, they go back into the closet and reappear every so often to keep it fresh in their brains.

    My kids work for a full period (45 minutes) independently. This is solely because of vocational bins I ordered from HANDS ON TASKS and match games for every subject and topic we have ever covered in the classroom. Believe me, I have QUITE the stash.

    Some of their little work bins have up to 50 cards (x2 because they have to match!) It is great for them to be able to work independently, they know exactly what they're doing, they're reinforcing mastered skills and IEP goals, and it's just an all around good situation.

    Don't make it too confusing, the purpose of the match cards is to make your life easier, because they're so easy to create, complete, and store!!
     
  18. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    May 12, 2010

    Okay, I'm going to make some right now, dang it. No more dilly-dallying. I'm doing a weather unit and just taught the kids how to read thermometers. So I'm thinking... cards with a thermometer on 'em matched to cards with the temp.... maybe another set with the temp and cards to match that have outfits on them.... temps and cards that have "hot" and "cold" on them..... HOLY LORD I'LL BE MAKING CARDS ALL NIGHT. :lol: Husbands' going to be all, "COME TO BED ALREADY. TURN THE **** PRINTER OFF." And I'll say, "It's sk's fault." ;)
     
  19. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    May 12, 2010

    Haha. Maybe your husband and my husband could be in a support group together. My husband has to literally count down, like I do with my middle school students with autism, "and it's time for bed in 5, 4, 3, 2.... alright turn it off. 1."

    So - something to keep in mind, is making sets that could rotate. So, you make one full set of thermometers. One full set of temperatures written in word form. One set of temperatures written in number form. One set of clothing, outfits, etc.

    1. thermometers
    2. temperatures (words)
    3. temperatures (numbers)
    4. clothing
    5. hot cold cards


    Then you could make sets of
    1, 2
    1, 3
    1, 4
    2, 3
    2, 4
    etc.

    Make sense? You can mix and match. So it's good to make your sets match up (when you do the thermometers, make the temperatures match up, words match up, etc.)

    It's great for small group instruction as well as independent! So, if you're learning about thermometers, you can practice them at the table!

    I think you'll join the match card game train fairly soon..
     
  20. LifeSkills

    LifeSkills Rookie

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    Jun 1, 2010

    These seem like great ideas...I definitely want to try them with my kids. But my kids fine motor skills are low, they can't clip clothespins together. How would you have them match the cards together? Thanks
     
  21. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Jun 1, 2010

    If you get the wooden clothespins, they are not too tough to squeeze open. If they are unable to squeeze clothespins, this is a great skill - as it is very minimal pressure.

    In the meantime, you can have them velcro the cards together. One set has hard velcro and one set has soft velcro. They can stick them together that way. That's what I did for one of my kids until she got the hang of the clothespins.

    You can also put them in envelopes (put a match in an envelope). Another option is to use library card pockets. You can have the answer on the card pocket and the index card can slide in.

    Another option would be (for really low kids) to only have three or so matches, and have baskets to put the matches in (3 baskets - one for each set).
     
  22. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

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    Aug 9, 2010

    Moving this up to the top as it was mentioned in another thread :).
     
  23. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Aug 9, 2010

    Thanks M2M! I love this thread. I might be biased though. Haha.
     
  24. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

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    Aug 9, 2010

    Its a great thread... I wanted to keep it buried because if I start reading it I know I will just be adding to my list of things to do ;).

    I actually have a great parent who is an SLPA come in once a week for a whole morning to do things for me and I'm thinking that this thread is going to become her job for the year - lol.
     
  25. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Aug 9, 2010

    Haha!!!! Man I get more and more jealous of you every time I read anything you write!!!!!


    Where is my parent volunteer? And my credit card to buy supplies!?

    A girl can dream!
     
  26. samsmom

    samsmom Rookie

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    Aug 11, 2010

    Because I am "borrowing" so many of these ideas, I just want to give a huge "thank you" to all who have contributed. These match games are fabulous. I'll tweak them for my kids and am -most- excited that it will assist in helping them become a bit more independent. Last year, they would not/could not work without an adult by them every step of the way. Thank you, thank you, thank you for sharing.
     
  27. samsmom

    samsmom Rookie

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    Aug 11, 2010

    Oooh. "Reading" faces?

    I wonder if I could have my kiddos w/ASD match feelings with faces? They have such difficulty reading others' emotions. Ooh. Ooh. Ooh. How about a set that matched action with consequence? Maybe that would be something to do in group time? I dunno, I'm thinking out loud. Has anyone tried them this way?
     
  28. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Aug 11, 2010

    I think when I was in the multiply handicapped room K-2, we did matching games with action/negative consequence
     
  29. specialeduc8tor

    specialeduc8tor Rookie

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    Aug 11, 2010

    This can be used for any subject, probably a little higher grade though...

    Create 4 columns in a microsoft word document with any list of vocabulary words with a different picture ("insert symbol") for each word. Then match that symbol with its definition or whatever you want the student to associate with the vocabulary word. You fold back the the picture column, laminate it, and voila! you have an instant self-checking system.

    Once you have a template, you can change the words and reuse! :O)
     

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