Teachers, look at this salary schedule in CA!

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by futuremathsprof, Nov 22, 2018.

  1. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 8, 2018

    I’d also rather spend my time doing things than commuting, except I get a ton of time off (2.5-month summer + 1.5-week Thanksgiving Break + 2.5-week Christmas Break + 1.5-week Spring Break + other federal holidays) from working as a teacher and so I have plenty of time to do things still.

    I also don’t have a spouse or kids to take care of — and never will — and so I have a lot of time on my hands to do the things I want, when I want. I’m living the life and each day is a new adventure.

    Sure, I may commute about 2-2.5 hours each school day for 4 days a week (I tutor out of town Monday through Thursday), but I have my Friday evenings and weekends all to myself. As such, I don’t ever think my life is lacking in any way.

    My situation is similar to an older-doctor friend of mine who finished her residency to be an orthopedist last year. When I heard her thinking about accepting a job that paid less, I sat down with her and encouraged her to move to a location that paid more in the short term so that she would benefit more in the long term. With clarification, had she taken the job offered closer to home, she would only make $375,000/year. But because she moved a few states away to a rural location, she now makes $625,000/year. I suggested to her that she work there for 5 years, live relatively frugally in that time so that she can save as much as possible, and then move back to her home state when she’s saved up enough to buy a $1-million home and nice cars outright, etc. Then, she can easily get a new job in the area she likes. She agreed.

    For me, it’s all about weighing your opportunity cost. I commute a lot NOW so that I can buy a house and pay it off a lot sooner than I would if I just worked my current teaching job. When I’m age 32-33 (or sooner as I just came into some lucrative business opportunities), my future house will be entirely paid off, I will prepay my bills for the entire year and drop my tutoring gig to live an extremely luxurious life on my six-figure teaching salary.

    In short, that’s why I’m willing to give up part of my free time now (in my 20’s) because my efforts will reap huge dividends later. That’s why I do what I do and I strongly recommend my methodology to others, which is to work hard now so that you can play hard for the majority of your life.
     
  2. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Messages:
    975
    Likes Received:
    194

    Dec 8, 2018

    In the end you have to do what is right for you, but I will say that your methodology isn't for everyone. I paid off my house in 7 years, and my DH and I have never made a car payment, so I do agree with working hard to reach goals. However, I do stand by my statement that there are other intangibles that matter, and in focusing only on the monetary aspects, it is possible to miss some of that. I've lived in a state where I didn't want to be before, and no amount of financial gain would be worth doing that again.
     
    mathmagic likes this.
  3. Tulipteacher

    Tulipteacher Companion

    Joined:
    May 7, 2016
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    91

    Dec 9, 2018

    That's your private school's calendar. My public school, granted, not in CA, has only these days off for teachers: 9 weeks in summer, 3 days at Thanksgiving, just under 2 weeks for Christmas (depends on when the holiday falls, but we typically have about 12 days, 1 week for spring break. For federal holidays, we get Labor Day and Veteran's Day. We are scheduled to be off for Memorial Day and Martin Luther King Day, but they are usually snow make-up days.

    You've posted before about your life philosophy. To each his own. But it truly baffles me why, with your math aptitude, you wouldn't have gone into medicine, scientific research, engineering, business, accounting. . . Just about anything would have paid more than teaching.
     
  4. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,684
    Likes Received:
    1,584

    Dec 9, 2018

    I don't say this will any ill will because everyone can be who they are and live their life as they like, but it seems from the numerous posts made by futuremathsprof that he doesn't have or want any of the intangibles that most of us desire. It may be said that he is the exception to the rule and pushes his guidance to everyone ignoring that most others view the intangibles as having a high value.
     
  5. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,223
    Likes Received:
    1,157

    Dec 9, 2018

    I, too, have often wondered this.
     
    greendream likes this.
  6. hmsmark

    hmsmark Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2015
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    6

    Dec 9, 2018

    I live in this area and teach at another school district. MVLA is a good school district and as you point out they have some of the highest salaries.

    However, as a teacher in another, relatively close district I have two cautions: One is that you should look into the employee reviews, which are available on glassdoor and others. They know they pay well, and so they don't tenure everyone. In fact, a majority of teachers hired don't get tenured. So, they may fire you in a couple of years. I have known GREAT teachers who have come from that district and said they were not re-elected because they didn't go to one after school activity the Principal was pushing. It's that kind of nit-picky stuff, but your mileage may vary. I've heard it from more than one source, however.

    The other is the whole housing/commute thing. You may want to really test out that 1.5-2 hour commute calculation. I have colleagues that live in Morgan Hill and they take more than an hour to get to work, and we're a bit closer than Mountain View. Gilroy is 1.5 hours on a good day. So, if you're in say: Hollister or Salinas (the nearest outposts of semi-cheap homes near the south Bay Area), you are not 1.5-2 hours away during commute times. You aren't the first person to try and live in the cheaper areas and commute in, and if you do it you will see all of them on 101 or whatever road you take as you crawl along at 10 mph. If you're in or near anywhere similar as the two cities mentioned, you're probably 2.5-3 hours away during commute times. That's a 5-6 hour round trip commute. I know it seems doable salivating at the salary, but that might be a bit much. It would be for me. I pay 2200 for a 1 bedroom apartment in a bad part of San Jose and it would take me about 45 minutes to get to Mountain View.

    Still, you wouldn't be the first to do it, so good luck!
     
    ms.irene and futuremathsprof like this.
  7. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 9, 2018

    With regards to your last paragraph, I’ve answered this before in other threads, but here it is again: The time off I get as a teacher is worth it to me. Also, I specifically chose to work in a community where I know the community members can pay top dollar for my tutoring services. That’s why.

    I make as much as my engineering and some of my doctorate friends and have the potential to make more than they do. The difference is that they work 50 workweeks per year and only get 2 weeks of paid vacation. I don’t work for 3+ months in the school year and make the same salary or more. That’s why I became a teacher.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2018
  8. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 9, 2018

    Please see my above post in this thread. Also, I’ve answered this in other posts that you were apart of before...
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2018
  9. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 9, 2018

    I don’t and will never have a dual-income household to pay off a future mortgage. I only have myself to rely on. Thus, I have to do it all alone and so I need to make a lot more if I am to pay it off in less than 10 years like I plan to.

    Also, I think most people tend to focus on instant gratification and don’t plan ahead long term. I’d rather give up a few years of “intangibles” and have an easy life for the vast majority of my life than to have “intangibles” continually every year and a menial life.

    This goes back to a saying I once heard that goes like this: “ You can have $1000 now or $10,000 in a year. Which do you choose?” Most people, unsurprisingly, choose to have the $1000 now and that is exactly the type of thinking I’m referencing.
     
    whizkid likes this.
  10. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Messages:
    975
    Likes Received:
    194

    Dec 9, 2018

    It is possible to be focused on the future and not be all about money and instant gratification. That doesn't equate to a 'menial' life, just one that may have a different focus. For me, those intangibles are relationships with family and friends, time volunteering and making connections in my community, etc. are part of what makes everything worthwhile. Planning - not taking that immediate $1000 - has allowed me to travel and to purchase the things I would like, but I like to think that my life is about those things and so much more. As I said before, we all have to do what works for us.
     
    futuremathsprof likes this.
  11. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 9, 2018

    I, too, think spending time with friends and family and improving my local community are incredibly important and valuable things. What I’m saying is why can’t you have the best of both worlds — the monetary and intangible?
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2018
  12. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 9, 2018

    Good advice about getting on the principal’s good side!

    I pay $550/month where I stay currently and the commute would be less for me than you think it might be. That’s only why I am thinking about this.
     
  13. hmsmark

    hmsmark Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2015
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    6

    Dec 10, 2018

    Fair enough on the commute... They are one of, if not THE, highest paying district in the state, so be advised that you may not actually get the job, especially if your experience puts you towards the top of their salary schedule. I'm guessing you're a math teacher going by your user name. Obviously that's a shortage field, but again they are a high paying district, so they probably have no shortage of applications. They didn't call me when I applied, but then again, I'm not a math teacher...

    You may check out Palo Alto USD and Sequoia High School District which are in that general area. Not as high on the salaries, but still decent.
     
    futuremathsprof and ms.irene like this.
  14. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,223
    Likes Received:
    1,157

    Dec 10, 2018

    I'm thinking you're in the Tracy/Livermore area. Not too familiar with Livermore, but I know home prices in Tracy are totally skyrocketing due to many commuters living there. My brother lives in that neck of the woods and his mortgage payment is insanely high.
     
  15. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    Messages:
    1,840
    Likes Received:
    586

    Dec 10, 2018

    I would be wary of leaving a job I liked where I have job security for a job without job security.
     
    ms.irene likes this.
  16. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2017
    Messages:
    435
    Likes Received:
    281

    Dec 10, 2018

    I think to each his own. If working 2 jobs makes you happy go for it. It wouldn't work for me. I really don't like the word menial in the context of the discussion. I also think the monetary and intangible can be met on a lower salary. I was also single when I bought my first house and paid it off in 10 years. I certainly didn't make over 100K at the time. I just think that there are lots of ways to be happy. If you want to work for this district go for it. I just think not everyone is going to see this as "the" way.
     
    a2z likes this.
  17. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    Messages:
    1,551
    Likes Received:
    728

    Dec 10, 2018

    It sounds like your personal motivators just might be a good fit in Silicon Valley. Best of luck to you!
     
    futuremathsprof and mathmagic like this.
  18. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 11, 2018

    This is a fair assessment. I don’t ignore those intangibles so much as I consider other alternatives. For example, I don’t think the grass is necessarily always greener on the other side (that is, having a family of my own, a spouse, and kids and living a modest lifestyle). For me, I know that if I were to jump over the hypothetical fence I would loudly exclaim, “Ah crap, it’s AstroTurf.”

    If you don’t mind me asking, what was the price of the home? I say this because paying off a 100k-200k home is very different than paying off 600k homes into today’s market.

    Second, how can “monetary” be met on a lower salary? How low is low to you? I want to live an extravagant lifestyle (frequent vacations, nights out with friends on the town, going to the cinema and out to eat often, pampering myself, buying the latest gadgets, driving nice cars, etc.).

    And you are right, there is not one way to do things and my way works best for me I suppose. I merely try to emulate the mindset of wealthier people where their work ethics and business sense are concerned, since wealthy people who started from nothing are wealthy for a reason.

    Lastly, I’m using menial here as in humble. I don’t want a minimalist, modest, or humble lifestyle when it comes to finances. After all, I only live once and I don’t want to just survive and get by with modest means. I want to *live*.
     
  19. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,684
    Likes Received:
    1,584

    Dec 11, 2018

    But some intangibles take a tremendous amount of time such as having and raising a family. In addition people who do this also like doing the intangibles you say are also important to you like spending time with their extended family or helping the community. So, when you advocate for your method of living and saving holding your situation as the norm, it really isn't the norm for most people. While you could spend more time with your extended family or helping the community if you so choose, your responsibilities are no where near that of someone who has these other obligations and finds them extremely important to them and is something they find the most important thing in life.
     
    YoungTeacherGuy likes this.
  20. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,684
    Likes Received:
    1,584

    Dec 11, 2018

    People who are wealthy typically sacrificed friends and family to get there unless they were very, very lucky to create some product or service that everyone just had to have or pick the right stocks at the right time. This could be by working so many hours or traveling a lot for the job. It is rare to find a job where you will get wealthy working 9-5 with 4 weeks of vacation and 5 days sick time.
     
  21. greendream

    greendream Cohort

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Messages:
    597
    Likes Received:
    127

    Dec 11, 2018

    [​IMG]
     
    YoungTeacherGuy likes this.
  22. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,223
    Likes Received:
    1,157

    Dec 11, 2018

    I don't understand how one can become "wealthy" on a teacher's salary plus tutoring on the side.

    Yes, I work many 60 hour weeks, but there's no way in he** I"ll ever be a "rich" school administrator. I'm okay with that, though.
     
    Linguist92021, a2z and greendream like this.
  23. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,684
    Likes Received:
    1,584

    Dec 11, 2018

    Doesn't that also depend on what you consider "wealthy"?

    Someone who was poor growing up may see middle class as wealthy where someone comfortably middle class who never went without would not see more of the same as wealthy.
     
    mathmagic likes this.
  24. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 11, 2018

    Maybe, but it really depends, I think. In my case, because I am diligent about saving and growing my wealth I have amassed quite the savings for someone so young despite working a 9-5 job.

    To demonstrate, I’ve saved 63k for a down payment on a house, I’ve set aside 20k for my next car, I’ve socked away 33k for retirement, I’ve currently got about ~7k in stocks (I sold the stocks in my prior portfolio to help pay off my car and credit card debt), and have ~16k in my checking. I have no consumer debt (no student loans, no car note, etc.) and my rent is dirt cheap so I can invest the majority of my income that would normally be put to housing and other bills. Plus, I’ve done all this and I’m only 26.

    How will I become wealthy? Well, I’m getting into investments more and more. That’s how. I’ve been corresponding with my some of my wealthier friends and with their stock brokers to see where and how I should invest.

    It’s actually pretty easy to grow wealth if you have discipline and the necessary funds. But, having the mindset that you cannot because you work a 9-5 job and because you have a teacher’s salary are reasons why people *won’t* ever get wealthy.

    For instance, my bills total $12,000 a year and have consecutively over the last five. For just this year alone, I will have a projected disposable annual income of ~$90,000 after taxes. Next year, I will get a $7,000 raise and then invest that and continue living off of my current salary.

    How could I not grow that to millions?
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2019
  25. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 11, 2018

    Thank you for your enlightening contribution to this discussion.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2018
  26. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 11, 2018

    Please read my post above of how I will achieve this. With your awesome salary as an administrator, you should be able to also because you are obviously very intelligent and fiscally savvy since you have to manage school budgets.
     
  27. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    6,463
    Likes Received:
    1,341

    Dec 11, 2018

    I think YTG is already "rich".
     
    MrsC likes this.
  28. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2005
    Messages:
    5,429
    Likes Received:
    947

    Dec 11, 2018

    I wouldn’t consider those things extravagant, necessarily. We take vacations, eat out when we want, go out when we want, buy what we want, drive the cars we want, own the house we want. I did the same thing single. It’s always been on a teacher salary. Living within your means (no matter the amount) is the key.
     
  29. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2017
    Messages:
    435
    Likes Received:
    281

    Dec 11, 2018

    I agree with Ima Teacher. I think my objection to the point of this thread is it is still putting forward the idea that this is the 'right' way. For example, I don't think YTG actually aspires to be wealthy. I don't. If someone handed me 2 million dollars tomorrow, I'd retire, buy a modest house, take about 5 or 10 years to do those slower, quieter things in life and then add in part time work as I saw fit. Since that isn't likely to happen and I"m probably going to work a regular length career, I'm happy to live within my means without spending too much time focused on money.

    For the record, I was making 36 K a year, moved up the grid, used some savings from good summer job and paid 200 K for my house and I actually paid it off in about 6 years. No one is doubting that paying off a house in an expensive market is harder than a softer market - which is kind of the point that people have been making about the salary being high but relative to the housing market.

    I also don't understand if your rent for the year is $6000 why you would ever buy a house. Assuming you are going to work for 30 years, that would be about 180,000 in current dollar rent. When you consider the taxes, insurance, power, etc on a 600,000 house I think you'd be better off just renting and putting all that money into your investments.

    I bought because I wanted to own.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2018
  30. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 11, 2018

    How did you pay off a 200k house in 6 years making only 36k/year? 36k*6 = 216k before taxes. How did you live off of 16k in less than 6 years, which amounts to $2,666.67/year? That doesn’t make sense to me.

    To answer your rent question, I don’t want to be at the mercy of a landlord forever and I will have to move eventually unless the landlord nevers decides to sell the house I’m currently staying in. I have to be prepared for the future.
     
  31. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 11, 2018

    To be fair, I never prepare my own food and always eat out at restaurants every day. I want to go on vacations several times a year, not just one or two. I want the best that this world has to offer within my means, which is why I constantly try to increase my means.
     
  32. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2017
    Messages:
    435
    Likes Received:
    281

    Dec 11, 2018

    So your comment about a landlord speaks to the idea that some intention other than money influences your decisions. I think that is the main point others have tried to make. That money is not the ONLY factor people consider in making decisions. As such, we all make the decisions that are best for us, which might be different from yours or the next 10 people who share a perspective.
     
  33. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    Messages:
    1,551
    Likes Received:
    728

    Dec 12, 2018

    FMP -- no offense intended, but are you actually in the US currently? I ask because I have never heard an American refer to a "car note" and I don't know of any American school salary tables that offer a $7k step.
     
  34. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,223
    Likes Received:
    1,157

    Dec 12, 2018

    Exactly. My district's steps are about 2k (and I thought that was high!).
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2018
  35. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,684
    Likes Received:
    1,584

    Dec 12, 2018

    That is a common phrase where I am from and friends from other states that I have met along the way say it too.
     
    futuremathsprof likes this.
  36. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 12, 2018

    I thought car note was a common phrase. Hmm. I do live in California, though.
     
  37. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 12, 2018

    This is what I thought. I was concerned for a second and thought I was behind the times, haha!
     
  38. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 12, 2018

    Really? I’ve listed several salary schedules before that have anywhere from $2,000-$4,000+ jumps.

    Why are some places with higher costs of living so low?
     
  39. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,223
    Likes Received:
    1,157

    Dec 12, 2018

    My district has one of the higher salary schedules for the Central Valley (probably the highest) and the jumps are still only about $2,200.
     
  40. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2014
    Messages:
    3,872
    Likes Received:
    1,076

    Dec 12, 2018

    When I was hired, I had a Masters + 5. I negotiated a $5,000 annual increase, but I started at $40,000, which is on the low side but I did so because of the opportunity for growth. When California passed a law to increase the state minimum wage by $0.50 or $1 per year, I argued that since minimum-wage workers were getting a $2,000/year increase, then I should, too, on top of my $5,000/year increase. They agreed that that was fair, hence the $7,000 figure.

    My school board is not cheap and believes in compensating its workers that keep the school running. After all, it doesn’t make sense to lose critical staff just because you refuse to pay them a little bit more. Anywho, my private school has ~$25 million dollar annual budget, on the average, and $60 million in reserves with about a $1-2 million surplus each year. And of the surplus, we save half of it, give bonuses to staff in accordance with standardized test results, make repairs to the school grounds and buy supplies, and use the remaining amount for salary negotiations (enter futuremathsprof).

    I’m happy with what I make currently, but I will always want more and because our math program is so successful, it attracts a lot of students (we had well over new 100 new students enroll this year alone) from surrounding schools, which I then leverage in my favor. Basically, I reckon that I should get paid more because I produce results and give a lot to my school and my higher-ups recognize this and compensate me accordingly.

    Sure, I found out that some of my colleagues don’t think it’s fair that they don’t get as high of raises that I do, but they should have negotiated like I did and produce results like I do. Salary should be based on education level AND performance and I perform, so I get paid!
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2018

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. bella84,
  2. ExploringTeaching,
  3. Mrs. K.
Total: 556 (members: 7, guests: 531, robots: 18)
test